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Late Night With David Letterman Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1993 | RICK DU BROW
How does a network say goodby to a star who has brought it big profits and prestige for 11 years but now is going to work for the competition after a heated public breakup? In short, will NBC and David Letterman--who has often needled the network and is moving to CBS this summer--have a gracious parting? Will NBC, which has virtually stopped promoting Letterman, show some class with a few gestures of gratitude? Or is it more like: Here's your hat, what's your hurry?
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2003 | Brian Lowry
David Letterman returned to CBS Monday night after a monthlong layoff and beat NBC's "The Tonight Show" by his widest margin since returning after heart surgery three years ago, according to preliminary Nielsen data. The host, who had shingles, had been off the air since Feb. 25, as CBS used reruns and a variety of guest hosts to fill the void.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2003 | Brian Lowry
David Letterman returned to CBS Monday night after a monthlong layoff and beat NBC's "The Tonight Show" by his widest margin since returning after heart surgery three years ago, according to preliminary Nielsen data. The host, who had shingles, had been off the air since Feb. 25, as CBS used reruns and a variety of guest hosts to fill the void.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2002 | Brian Lowry, Times Staff Writer
Forget mundane skirmishes over booking guests or conceiving the best comedy bits. The late-night battle between "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" and "Late Show With David Letterman" this fall has boiled down to back-and-forth salvos of public-relations spin. Of course, the beauty of ratings is that both networks can use them to support their respective points, prompting a weekly barrage of news releases that draw different conclusions from the same set of numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Howard Rosenberg is The Times' television critic.
Call it bad timing or bad luck. But how ironic that "The Tonight Show" has strong ratings, that its writing is consistently sharp, that host Jay Leno is funnier and his hour of late-night comedy more creative and less predictable than ever. In other circumstances, everyone would be buzzing about him. Competing with his nemesis, David Letterman, seems to have made Leno better.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE
Representatives of CBS and David Letterman met Tuesday and said that they are trying to work out arrangements for his late-night TV show to stay in New York rather than relocate to Los Angeles when he leaves NBC in June. "If some facilities concerns can be worked out, the show would like to remain in New York," a CBS spokeswoman said. "We are presently reviewing some studio space and logistics questions. We expect no definitive announcement for a few days."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2002 | Brian Lowry, Times Staff Writer
Forget mundane skirmishes over booking guests or conceiving the best comedy bits. The late-night battle between "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" and "Late Show With David Letterman" this fall has boiled down to back-and-forth salvos of public-relations spin. Of course, the beauty of ratings is that both networks can use them to support their respective points, prompting a weekly barrage of news releases that draw different conclusions from the same set of numbers.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine this: a Top 10 list on the "Late Show With David Letterman" on why the Time Warner Inc. board should replace Gerald Levin. Or how about the top 10 ways to fire a music executive. The possibilities might have been endless had Michael Fuchs been picked up as a writer on the CBS late show when he offered his services several weeks ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
David Letterman is listening to frequent guest Sandra Bernhard. As Bernhard is telling Letterman one of her bizarre stories, a chimpanzee wearing a tiny minicam on its head repeatedly whizzes by on roller skates. Then the same chimpanzee, whose name is Zippy, whizzes by on a skateboard. Again and again-- whhhhoooosh! --Zippy passes in front of the camera. Soon Bernhard, whose stock in trade as a comic is humor that's outrageous, appears rattled.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1992 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
David Letterman, who will mark the 10th anniversary of his late-night NBC show next week, said Monday that he would consider moving to ABC or elsewhere when his current contract runs out. Letterman, who was passed over as Johnny Carson's heir to host NBC's "The Tonight Show"--which will go to Jay Leno in May--said that his contract has "at least" another year to go.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | JOHN POPE
A persistent dog was the inspiration for 8-year-old Chris Populus' Fetch-O-Matic, an invention that allows a canine to play catch on its own after its human companions drop out of the game. Second-grader Kimberly Larson's desire for a perfectly toasted marshmallow led to the Turbo Roaster 2000, and Justin Bullock's Bug Alive provides a gentle way to remove insects from the home.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine this: a Top 10 list on the "Late Show With David Letterman" on why the Time Warner Inc. board should replace Gerald Levin. Or how about the top 10 ways to fire a music executive. The possibilities might have been endless had Michael Fuchs been picked up as a writer on the CBS late show when he offered his services several weeks ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1994 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
Once upon a time, guest hosts thrived on late-night TV, namely in the Johnny Carson years of "The Tonight Show." That era is dead as CBS' David Letterman and NBC's Jay Leno go at each other night after night in the early stages of their competition. Letterman, in fact, never had a guest host in his old NBC series either.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Howard Rosenberg is The Times' television critic.
Call it bad timing or bad luck. But how ironic that "The Tonight Show" has strong ratings, that its writing is consistently sharp, that host Jay Leno is funnier and his hour of late-night comedy more creative and less predictable than ever. In other circumstances, everyone would be buzzing about him. Competing with his nemesis, David Letterman, seems to have made Leno better.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | DANIEL CERONE, Daniel Cerone is a Times staff writer
A week ago Friday, Steven Seagal made his first appearance on David Letterman's "Late Show" to hype his new action film, "On Deadly Ground." Last Tuesday, Seagal visited the syndicated late-night talk show of his friend, Arsenio Hall, for the same reason. Two nights later, Seagal could be seen chatting up his movie with Jay Leno on "The Tonight Show." So, whatever happened to those late-night Booking Wars?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1993 | RICK DU BROW
How does a network say goodby to a star who has brought it big profits and prestige for 11 years but now is going to work for the competition after a heated public breakup? In short, will NBC and David Letterman--who has often needled the network and is moving to CBS this summer--have a gracious parting? Will NBC, which has virtually stopped promoting Letterman, show some class with a few gestures of gratitude? Or is it more like: Here's your hat, what's your hurry?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | DANIEL CERONE, Daniel Cerone is a Times staff writer
A week ago Friday, Steven Seagal made his first appearance on David Letterman's "Late Show" to hype his new action film, "On Deadly Ground." Last Tuesday, Seagal visited the syndicated late-night talk show of his friend, Arsenio Hall, for the same reason. Two nights later, Seagal could be seen chatting up his movie with Jay Leno on "The Tonight Show." So, whatever happened to those late-night Booking Wars?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | JOHN POPE
A persistent dog was the inspiration for 8-year-old Chris Populus' Fetch-O-Matic, an invention that allows a canine to play catch on its own after its human companions drop out of the game. Second-grader Kimberly Larson's desire for a perfectly toasted marshmallow led to the Turbo Roaster 2000, and Justin Bullock's Bug Alive provides a gentle way to remove insects from the home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE
Representatives of CBS and David Letterman met Tuesday and said that they are trying to work out arrangements for his late-night TV show to stay in New York rather than relocate to Los Angeles when he leaves NBC in June. "If some facilities concerns can be worked out, the show would like to remain in New York," a CBS spokeswoman said. "We are presently reviewing some studio space and logistics questions. We expect no definitive announcement for a few days."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
David Letterman smiled mischievously the other night as he told his audience, "You know, I was thinking while driving the other day, I only have five more chances to be named NBC Employee of the Month." The comment was just one of a series of reminders to viewers of "Late Night With David Letterman" that Letterman will be departing NBC June 25 and moving to CBS this summer to compete head to head with "The Tonight Show."
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