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January 31, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The West German zoologist greeted 50 Costa Rican peasants in the shade of a sprawling fig tree. "Good afternoon," Dagmar Werner told her guests with a half-smile. "I am Mama Iguana." Languishing in three long rows of cages behind Werner was her adopted brood--2,350 green iguanas. For people who have hunted the tree-dwelling lizard into near extinction, it was an impressive sight. "Man has eaten iguana for thousands of years, but they are disappearing," she began the lecture.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pardon the Ecuadoreans for being a little dubious about "free trade." An international banana war triggered by the European Union has devastated plantations clustered around this coastal city. The effect has been the same in Panama, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. It has also rippled through the boardroom at Dole Food Co. in Westlake Village and clobbered consumers in Europe.
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BUSINESS
August 3, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pardon the Ecuadoreans for being a little dubious about "free trade." An international banana war triggered by the European Union has devastated plantations clustered around this coastal city. The effect has been the same in Panama, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. It has also rippled through the boardroom at Dole Food Co. in Westlake Village and clobbered consumers in Europe.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No need for pesticides, Colombian agronomist Cesar Marulanda was telling 20 women. Just brush the aphids from the young lettuce leaves like this. "They fall off, and they don't have much chance of returning." Marulanda was talking about hydroponics--the growing of plants, not in soil, but in nutrient-rich solutions or moist, inert materials--and the women were paying close attention. Some were taking notes.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1989 | From Reuters
Coffee prices sank to eight-month lows Tuesday as traders anticipated the collapse of a 25-year-old pact limiting exports by coffee-producing countries will unleash a greater supply on the market. Coffee for delivery in September dropped $143 (90 British pounds) to $1,352 (850 pounds) per metric ton. Before it became evident that the 74-nation agreement would fail, prices had held above $1,590 (1,000 pounds) a ton.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of Latin American air carriers has encouraged fruit distributors to delay their shipments to Los Angeles International Airport to avoid an intensive inspection program meant to determine whether pests, including the Medfly, are entering California via air cargo, agriculture authorities said Wednesday.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The California health official who threatened to issue a health advisory unless bananas treated with an acutely toxic pesticide were removed from the market said Thursday that the use of the chemical constituted "an accident waiting to happen." Dr. Richard Jackson, chief of the state's Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Division, also described a series of conference calls between federal agencies and state health departments over the pesticide last week as "extremely confrontational."
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No need for pesticides, Colombian agronomist Cesar Marulanda was telling 20 women. Just brush the aphids from the young lettuce leaves like this. "They fall off, and they don't have much chance of returning." Marulanda was talking about hydroponics--the growing of plants, not in soil, but in nutrient-rich solutions or moist, inert materials--and the women were paying close attention. Some were taking notes.
NEWS
November 30, 1997 | KRISHNAN GURUSWAMY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Working with humble cereals and lentils long ignored by science, agricultural researchers in the Indian heartland have helped relieve famine in Asia, revolutionize diets in Latin America, revive agriculture in war-torn Africa. Now, a quarter-century after the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics began its search for new farming methods and crop varieties to help the world's hungry, some people fear its work could be in jeopardy.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A swift tour through the world of agriculture reveals a myriad of faces and problems. The Kenyan farmer in a tattered fedora, his frown etched with reluctance, ponders a British expert's suggestion that he switch to a new cash crop. An Indian scours the skies of Haryana state for signs of the gray clouds that carry the monsoon rains to his parched land.
NEWS
June 14, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The California health official who threatened to issue a health advisory unless bananas treated with an acutely toxic pesticide were removed from the market said Thursday that the use of the chemical constituted "an accident waiting to happen." Dr. Richard Jackson, chief of the state's Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Division, also described a series of conference calls between federal agencies and state health departments over the pesticide last week as "extremely confrontational."
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of Latin American air carriers has encouraged fruit distributors to delay their shipments to Los Angeles International Airport to avoid an intensive inspection program meant to determine whether pests, including the Medfly, are entering California via air cargo, agriculture authorities said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1989 | From Reuters
Coffee prices sank to eight-month lows Tuesday as traders anticipated the collapse of a 25-year-old pact limiting exports by coffee-producing countries will unleash a greater supply on the market. Coffee for delivery in September dropped $143 (90 British pounds) to $1,352 (850 pounds) per metric ton. Before it became evident that the 74-nation agreement would fail, prices had held above $1,590 (1,000 pounds) a ton.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
The West German zoologist greeted 50 Costa Rican peasants in the shade of a sprawling fig tree. "Good afternoon," Dagmar Werner told her guests with a half-smile. "I am Mama Iguana." Languishing in three long rows of cages behind Werner was her adopted brood--2,350 green iguanas. For people who have hunted the tree-dwelling lizard into near extinction, it was an impressive sight. "Man has eaten iguana for thousands of years, but they are disappearing," she began the lecture.
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