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Latin America Currency

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NEWS
April 2, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where old struggles with the United States linger ghostlike in the public psyche, Raymundo Winkler offers an almost unnerving vision for the future. "Maybe we would have coins with the faces of our Mexican heroes for use in parking meters," declares Winkler, who heads the largest council of industries in Mexico City. "But the dominant currency obviously would be the U.S. dollar." Remarkably, his voice is blending with a larger chorus throughout the Americas.
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BUSINESS
June 27, 2002 | SAM DAGHER, REUTERS
Mexico's peso closed on Wednesday at its weakest level since early 1999 and stocks hit new lows for the year on fear that the Mexican economy and markets may be hurt by fallout from U.S. accounting scandals. The peso shed 1.2% from Tuesday to close at 10.004 per U.S. dollar, its weakest level since Feb. 10, 1999, raising chances that Mexico's central bank would restrict liquidity in the local money market to support the currency and calm inflation fears.
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NEWS
April 2, 1999
In recent years, the global financial system has been rocked by turmoil over the value of money, from Asia to South America. In the process, terms that were once limited to scholarly debate have migrated to the front page: "Dollarization": This refers to efforts by nations to adopt U.S. dollars as their domestic currency. In a complete dollarization, as Argentina is considering, the dollar would replace the existing domestic currency altogether.
NEWS
April 2, 1999 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where old struggles with the United States linger ghostlike in the public psyche, Raymundo Winkler offers an almost unnerving vision for the future. "Maybe we would have coins with the faces of our Mexican heroes for use in parking meters," declares Winkler, who heads the largest council of industries in Mexico City. "But the dominant currency obviously would be the U.S. dollar." Remarkably, his voice is blending with a larger chorus throughout the Americas.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombia on Wednesday became the first Latin American nation to devalue its currency since the Asian crisis began, a move that could put added pressure on its Latin American neighbors to devalue as well. But Wednesday at least, markets in Venezuela, the Latin nation considered most susceptible to devaluation pressures, seemed to shrug off the news of the de facto devaluation of Bogota's peso.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Latin American currencies are ill-equipped to withstand the pressures of the high-speed global economy, the Inter-American Development Bank on Sunday issued a report urging the region to consider linking its currencies to the dollar or replacing them with greenbacks altogether.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2002 | SAM DAGHER, REUTERS
Mexico's peso closed on Wednesday at its weakest level since early 1999 and stocks hit new lows for the year on fear that the Mexican economy and markets may be hurt by fallout from U.S. accounting scandals. The peso shed 1.2% from Tuesday to close at 10.004 per U.S. dollar, its weakest level since Feb. 10, 1999, raising chances that Mexico's central bank would restrict liquidity in the local money market to support the currency and calm inflation fears.
NEWS
April 2, 1999
In recent years, the global financial system has been rocked by turmoil over the value of money, from Asia to South America. In the process, terms that were once limited to scholarly debate have migrated to the front page: "Dollarization": This refers to efforts by nations to adopt U.S. dollars as their domestic currency. In a complete dollarization, as Argentina is considering, the dollar would replace the existing domestic currency altogether.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that Latin American currencies are ill-equipped to withstand the pressures of the high-speed global economy, the Inter-American Development Bank on Sunday issued a report urging the region to consider linking its currencies to the dollar or replacing them with greenbacks altogether.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Colombia on Wednesday became the first Latin American nation to devalue its currency since the Asian crisis began, a move that could put added pressure on its Latin American neighbors to devalue as well. But Wednesday at least, markets in Venezuela, the Latin nation considered most susceptible to devaluation pressures, seemed to shrug off the news of the de facto devaluation of Bogota's peso.
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