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Latin America Elections

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October 16, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH and WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writers
When the people of Chile voted this month to reject an extension of rule by Gen. Augusto Pinochet, they chose an uncertain path leading back into the Latin American community of democracies. It has not been an entirely comfortable community for the countries that preceded Chile. The region's democratic renaissance, now nearly a decade old, is taking place slowly and painfully. Its elusive goals of economic well-being and political liberty are not likely to be fully realized at any time soon.
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NEWS
September 17, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As she stood proudly on the rupturing fringes of the second-most populous city on the globe, in the mud of a shantytown that is only a dirt mine on maps, it was hard for Alejandra Sanchez to look with hope to the future--her future, Mexico's future, the bold, new future the next president has vowed to bring. The present, she said just a week after Mexico's historic presidential election, is hard enough.
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OPINION
October 31, 1993 | Ruben Martinez, Ruben Martinez, an editor at Pacific News Service, has written extensively on Central American politics. He is co-host of KCET's "Life and Times."
These are heady times for the Salvadoran left as the March, 1994, presidential elections draw nearer. For Ruben Zamora, they are times of personal and political vindication. Like so many Salvadorans, the founder of the Social Christian Popular Movement and long-time leader of the Democratic Revolutionary Front lived the conflict. His brother was killed by death squads in 1980, and he lived in exile until 1987, when he returned to help found the Democratic Convergence.
OPINION
October 31, 1993 | Ruben Martinez, Ruben Martinez, an editor at Pacific News Service, has written extensively on Central American politics. He is co-host of KCET's "Life and Times."
These are heady times for the Salvadoran left as the March, 1994, presidential elections draw nearer. For Ruben Zamora, they are times of personal and political vindication. Like so many Salvadorans, the founder of the Social Christian Popular Movement and long-time leader of the Democratic Revolutionary Front lived the conflict. His brother was killed by death squads in 1980, and he lived in exile until 1987, when he returned to help found the Democratic Convergence.
NEWS
September 17, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As she stood proudly on the rupturing fringes of the second-most populous city on the globe, in the mud of a shantytown that is only a dirt mine on maps, it was hard for Alejandra Sanchez to look with hope to the future--her future, Mexico's future, the bold, new future the next president has vowed to bring. The present, she said just a week after Mexico's historic presidential election, is hard enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1989 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a professor of political science at the National Autonomous University in Mexico
Elections have become a relatively commonplace matter in Latin America: After the authoritarian trend of the 1970s, the '80s saw the emergence of formally representative democracies in most Latin American nations. Two lagged behind: Chile and Brazil. The last presidential elections in Chile were held in 1970; the most recent direct election of a Brazilian president took place in 1960.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH and WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writers
When the people of Chile voted this month to reject an extension of rule by Gen. Augusto Pinochet, they chose an uncertain path leading back into the Latin American community of democracies. It has not been an entirely comfortable community for the countries that preceded Chile. The region's democratic renaissance, now nearly a decade old, is taking place slowly and painfully. Its elusive goals of economic well-being and political liberty are not likely to be fully realized at any time soon.
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