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Latin America Foreign Aid

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NEWS
July 5, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, in another major effort to help Latin America, is preparing a proposal to establish a multibillion-dollar international aid program for the region similar to the one the Western powers set up last year for Eastern Europe. Although President Bush has not given final approval to the plan, U.S. officials say he is likely to unveil it at next week's seven-nation economic summit in Houston.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Foreign direct investment in Latin America and the Caribbean rose 32% in 1999, making the region the biggest recipient of overseas money among developing countries, a United Nations report said. Investment flows into the region rose to $97 billion from $73 billion in 1998, surpassing emerging markets in Asia for the first time since 1986, the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development said, citing preliminary estimates. South and Southeast Asia drew $84 billion in investment, it said.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Foreign direct investment in Latin America and the Caribbean rose 32% in 1999, making the region the biggest recipient of overseas money among developing countries, a United Nations report said. Investment flows into the region rose to $97 billion from $73 billion in 1998, surpassing emerging markets in Asia for the first time since 1986, the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development said, citing preliminary estimates. South and Southeast Asia drew $84 billion in investment, it said.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Once again Latin America is in financial distress. The United States is ready to back Mexico with up to $40 billion in loan guarantees. Elsewhere, governments and industries in Brazil, Argentina and Chile nervously watch stock markets and currency exchanges to see if foreign investment will come in or flow out--and thus determine whether their economies will go forward or backward this year. Meanwhile, U.S.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Once again Latin America is in financial distress. The United States is ready to back Mexico with up to $40 billion in loan guarantees. Elsewhere, governments and industries in Brazil, Argentina and Chile nervously watch stock markets and currency exchanges to see if foreign investment will come in or flow out--and thus determine whether their economies will go forward or backward this year. Meanwhile, U.S.
NEWS
February 6, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
China will build a $4-million sports stadium for St. Lucia as a reward for breaking diplomatic ties with Taiwan, the Caribbean country's government said. Foreign Minister George Odlum said the Chinese had also expressed interest in investing in offshore banking services on the island. St. Lucia broke ties with China's rival, Taiwan, 17 months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1989
President Bush, sometimes encouraged to do even more by Congress, has responded with substantial generosity to the pressing new needs of Eastern Europe, notably Poland and Hungary, and now the challenge of rebuilding Panama after the American military intervention. Most Americans, we among them, applaud this response and count it as consistent with the American tradition of encouraging freedom and responding with compassion to emergencies.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, in another major effort to help Latin America, is preparing a proposal to establish a multibillion-dollar international aid program for the region similar to the one the Western powers set up last year for Eastern Europe. Although President Bush has not given final approval to the plan, U.S. officials say he is likely to unveil it at next week's seven-nation economic summit in Houston.
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