Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLatin America Foreign Debt
IN THE NEWS

Latin America Foreign Debt

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In an effort to bolster rain forest conservation in Latin America, BankAmerica Corp. said it will donate up to $6 million of its Latin American loan repayments to conservation groups. Instead of repaying loans owed to the San Francisco bank, the debtor nation would negotiate with conservation groups and identify environmental projects that the money could fund.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In an effort to bolster rain forest conservation in Latin America, BankAmerica Corp. said it will donate up to $6 million of its Latin American loan repayments to conservation groups. Instead of repaying loans owed to the San Francisco bank, the debtor nation would negotiate with conservation groups and identify environmental projects that the money could fund.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 28, 1985
President Fidel Castro of Cuba, in an interview published in the Mexico City newspaper Excelsior, said that Latin America's foreign debt cannot be repaid and should be canceled. Castro was quoted as saying, "Payment of the foreign debt of Latin America constitutes an economic, political and moral impossibility." Creditor nations, he said, "should do something about it" and divert 10 or 12% of their military budgets to help repay the banks holding the loans.
NEWS
July 31, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Cuban President Fidel Castro convened hundreds of delegates here Tuesday for a "continental dialogue" on Latin America's foreign debt, a five-day meeting that has the makings of an earnest but tedious talkathon. What gives it a crackle of electricity, a hint of daring and danger, is Castro's latest pet project. He is campaigning for a foreign debt revolt among Latin American and Caribbean countries.
NEWS
August 4, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
In a five-day meeting that concluded here Saturday night, Latin American leftists and liberals strongly endorsed President Fidel Castro's campaign for a foreign debt revolt in the region. "The foreign debt is a cancer," Castro said in the meeting's closing session. "Imperialism has created that cancer, and it must be totally eradicated by surgery. I see no other solution."
NEWS
December 15, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
Brazil, the Third World's largest debtor nation, has decided to lead a regional Latin American negotiating group grappling with ways to obtain better terms from foreign creditors that will allow the region to maintain economic growth while paying $35 billion a year on its foreign debt.
NEWS
June 10, 1986 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
As if to turn the tables after recent U.S. criticism of the Mexican government, Mexican Foreign Minister Bernardo Sepulveda on Monday attacked U.S. policies on Latin America's foreign debt, Central America and drug traffic. Sepulveda, speaking to a gathering of journalists and academicians at a luncheon here sponsored by UC San Diego, gave a sweeping overview of Mexican foreign policy concerns and a lengthy defense of Mexico's economic policies.
NEWS
November 27, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The government imposed heavy security Thursday on the resort of Acapulco, where eight Latin American presidents gathered to discuss the region's staggering foreign debt and ways to promote trade with the United States. About 10,000 soldiers carrying automatic rifles sealed off Acapulco's airport and lined the road to the main hotel strip facing the bay of the famed resort, 180 miles south of Mexico City.
NEWS
August 5, 1985 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
A famous Communist defending a fugitive capitalist? It might seem odd, but there was President Fidel Castro telling a press conference Sunday that fugitive financier Robert Vesco is being persecuted by the United States "as if he were a beast." Castro's remarks about Vesco shed little new light on the shadowy life and times of the former mutual fund operator, who is charged with swindling investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1988 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
In a show of debtor unity, six South American finance ministers met here Monday and agreed that concerted, urgent measures are needed to reduce foreign debt payments by their countries. A joint statement by the six ministers and a special representative from Mexico did not give details on any action to be taken, but it emphasized that funds now used to service foreign debts are needed to finance economic development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1986
In the context of Latin America's massive foreign debt--more than $300 billion, and counting--the $3-billion trade agreement signed last week by Argentina and Brazil looks small. But the pacts could set a precedent that will benefit the entire Western Hemisphere. The trade protocols were signed during a state visit to Argentina by Brazilian President Jose Sarney.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|