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Latin America Foreign Policy

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February 16, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf War has stirred up a welter of conflicting sentiments in Latin America, making it difficult for many of the region's governments to fully support the United States and its allies. Some Latin Americans look up to the United States and Western Europe, yearning to become part of that First World clan. In contrast, however, the Latin American view of the war is often colored by anti-Yankee bias and Third World solidarity, especially among leftists and nationalists.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1997 | ROBERT A. PASTOR, Robert A. Pastor is a professor of political science at Emory University and director of the Latin American and Caribbean program at the Carter Center
In the past two years, as the president and Congress quarreled, U.S. policy toward Latin America has swung from partnership and free trade to paternalism and protectionism. In his second term, President Clinton needs to forge a domestic partnership with Congress as a first step toward consolidating a democratic alliance with the fastest growing market for U.S. goods.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1997 | ROBERT A. PASTOR, Robert A. Pastor is a professor of political science at Emory University and director of the Latin American and Caribbean program at the Carter Center
In the past two years, as the president and Congress quarreled, U.S. policy toward Latin America has swung from partnership and free trade to paternalism and protectionism. In his second term, President Clinton needs to forge a domestic partnership with Congress as a first step toward consolidating a democratic alliance with the fastest growing market for U.S. goods.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf War has stirred up a welter of conflicting sentiments in Latin America, making it difficult for many of the region's governments to fully support the United States and its allies. Some Latin Americans look up to the United States and Western Europe, yearning to become part of that First World clan. In contrast, however, the Latin American view of the war is often colored by anti-Yankee bias and Third World solidarity, especially among leftists and nationalists.
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