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Latin America Government Officials

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NEWS
December 21, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American leaders, even those who shared Washington's aim of ending Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's dictatorship in Panama, overwhelmingly condemned the U.S. military invasion there Wednesday and refrained from recognizing his American-installed successor. After a flurry of urgent telephone consultations begun before dawn, officials across the Western Hemisphere declared that the Bush Administration had violated their cherished principle of nonintervention.
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NEWS
November 4, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, President Alberto Fujimori banished his wife, his brother, his longtime friends and even his spy chief, Vladimiro Montesinos, until he had only a single ally left. In the weeks since the political crisis that led to Montesinos' firing, 23-year-old Keiko Fujimori--Peru's slightly chubby, sometimes shy first lady--has emerged as her father's spokeswoman and, from all appearances, closest confidant.
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NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Latin American democracies Monday embraced Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's stunning upset victory in Nicaragua as proof of an anti-totalitarian groundswell in the region. Chamorro's victory "enormously fortified democracy in the region, and we can foresee a promising future for her country and for definitive peace," President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina said in a statement in Buenos Aires. El Salvador, a close U.S.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Latin presidents closed a summit in Cartagena, Colombia, by emphatically pledging to reinforce a trade embargo against Haiti's military-backed government. But the presidents failed to define a clear hemisphere policy for encouraging democracy in Cuba. Meanwhile, Brazilian President Fernando Collor de Melo promised to formalize Brazil's first economic program sponsored by the International Monetary Fund in exchange for $2 billion in IMF credits.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Three Latin American presidents appealed Thursday for a new dialogue with the next American President to forge common solutions to the daunting regional problems of drugs, foreign debt and economic stagnation. At the start of a three-day summit meeting of seven Latin American presidents, Raul Alfonsin of Argentina, Alan Garcia of Peru and Miguel de la Madrid of Mexico each called for a new era in hemispheric relations based on more mature, balanced ties with the next U.S. Administration.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | Reuters
The leaders of five Latin American nations will meet on a ship bound for the Galapagos Islands Dec. 16-17 to discuss economic integration in the Andean region, a government spokesman said Wednesday. Participants include Venezuela's Carlos Andres Perez, Colombia's Virgilio Barco Vargas, Ecuador's Rodrigo Borja Cevallos, Peru's Alan Garcia and Bolivia's Jaime Paz Zamora.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Latin presidents closed a summit in Cartagena, Colombia, by emphatically pledging to reinforce a trade embargo against Haiti's military-backed government. But the presidents failed to define a clear hemisphere policy for encouraging democracy in Cuba. Meanwhile, Brazilian President Fernando Collor de Melo promised to formalize Brazil's first economic program sponsored by the International Monetary Fund in exchange for $2 billion in IMF credits.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, President Alberto Fujimori banished his wife, his brother, his longtime friends and even his spy chief, Vladimiro Montesinos, until he had only a single ally left. In the weeks since the political crisis that led to Montesinos' firing, 23-year-old Keiko Fujimori--Peru's slightly chubby, sometimes shy first lady--has emerged as her father's spokeswoman and, from all appearances, closest confidant.
NEWS
July 24, 1988 | EDUARDO GALLARDO, Associated Press
Most Latin American countries are stepping up efforts to help millions of abandoned children. But they often are frustrated by critical economic conditions, old laws, war and political violence. From Mexico to Chile, governments are allocating new resources, passing legislation and establishing aid institutions. Nevertheless, the results remain poor.
NEWS
September 7, 1997 | BART JONES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Not long ago, environmentalists were as rare in Venezuela as the Orinocan crocodile. Today, they're a vibrant movement defending a modern-day Eden from chain saws, bulldozers and the pollution of rapid economic development. Blossoming since the 1970s into half a dozen groups that have full-time staffs and scores of other volunteer organizations, environmentalists are using their growing muscle with some success.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Latin American democracies Monday embraced Violeta Barrios de Chamorro's stunning upset victory in Nicaragua as proof of an anti-totalitarian groundswell in the region. Chamorro's victory "enormously fortified democracy in the region, and we can foresee a promising future for her country and for definitive peace," President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina said in a statement in Buenos Aires. El Salvador, a close U.S.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American leaders, even those who shared Washington's aim of ending Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's dictatorship in Panama, overwhelmingly condemned the U.S. military invasion there Wednesday and refrained from recognizing his American-installed successor. After a flurry of urgent telephone consultations begun before dawn, officials across the Western Hemisphere declared that the Bush Administration had violated their cherished principle of nonintervention.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | Reuters
The leaders of five Latin American nations will meet on a ship bound for the Galapagos Islands Dec. 16-17 to discuss economic integration in the Andean region, a government spokesman said Wednesday. Participants include Venezuela's Carlos Andres Perez, Colombia's Virgilio Barco Vargas, Ecuador's Rodrigo Borja Cevallos, Peru's Alan Garcia and Bolivia's Jaime Paz Zamora.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Three Latin American presidents appealed Thursday for a new dialogue with the next American President to forge common solutions to the daunting regional problems of drugs, foreign debt and economic stagnation. At the start of a three-day summit meeting of seven Latin American presidents, Raul Alfonsin of Argentina, Alan Garcia of Peru and Miguel de la Madrid of Mexico each called for a new era in hemispheric relations based on more mature, balanced ties with the next U.S. Administration.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1997 | BART JONES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Not long ago, environmentalists were as rare in Venezuela as the Orinocan crocodile. Today, they're a vibrant movement defending a modern-day Eden from chain saws, bulldozers and the pollution of rapid economic development. Blossoming since the 1970s into half a dozen groups that have full-time staffs and scores of other volunteer organizations, environmentalists are using their growing muscle with some success.
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