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Latin America Population

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July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
People in Latin America living at or below the poverty line grew to more than 64% of the population in the last two decades, the Chile-based U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean reported. The report estimated that last year 183 million people--44% of the population--lived in poverty, defined as having only enough for life's basic needs.
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NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
People in Latin America living at or below the poverty line grew to more than 64% of the population in the last two decades, the Chile-based U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean reported. The report estimated that last year 183 million people--44% of the population--lived in poverty, defined as having only enough for life's basic needs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1990 | SUSAN KAUFMAN PURCELL, Susan Kaufman Purcell is vice-president for Latin American Affairs at the Americas Society in New York.
President Bush's "Enterprise for the Americas" initiative, which proposes the creation of a hemispheric free-trade zone and expands Washington's debt-relief program, contradicts the conventional wisdom that the end of the Cold War will cause the United States to ignore Latin America. Instead, the absence of a communist threat will allow Washington to work with its neighbors toward the creation of a single hemispheric market characterized by democratic governments engaged in free trade.
NEWS
August 26, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
The foreign ministers of eight Latin American democracies, including Brazil and Argentina, announced an action program Sunday to promote a prompt peace and security agreement in strife-torn Central America. The foreign ministers, whose countries represent 85% of Latin America's population, agreed to carry their drive for a Central American peace pact to Washington and Havana, as well as to put pressure on the five Central American countries that have been stalling on an agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1986
The foreign ministers of the eight biggest democracies in Latin America gathered last week in Brazil for a meeting that has important implications for the crisis in Central America and that could also have a profound effect on future U.S.-Latin American relations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1987 | ABRAHAM F. LOWENTHAL, Abraham F. Lowenthal, a professor of international relations at USC and the executive director of the Inter-American Dialogue, is the author of "Partners in Conflict: The United States and Latin America" (Johns Hopkins University Press).
Latin American nations, large and small, no longer want their futures to be made in the United States. That is the underlying message from the eight Latin American presidents who met last weekend in Acapulco, as it was the fundamental meaning of last August's Central American peace agreement. The very fact that eight Latin American presidents met for four days without even inviting the President of the United States, an unprecedented event, was noteworthy.
OPINION
December 3, 1995 | Charles Wolf Jr., Charles Wolf Jr. is dean of the RAND Graduate School of policy studies.
If East Asia (population: 1.8 billion) continues its extraordinarily high rate of growth through the 1990s and beyond; if South Asia (population: 1.
WORLD
January 12, 2004 | Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writer
Three months after taking office, a deferential President Bush made his debut on the world stage by embracing -- and charming -- Latin America. "I grew up in a world where if you treat your neighbor well, it's a good start to developing a wholesome community," he told his 33 counterparts at the Summit of the Americas. Three years later, Bush is deeply unpopular in much of the region.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG and MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Deep within this 2.2-million-acre reserve, smoke billowed up from the lap of a forested hill where Raul Romero was burning felled trees. He was clearing virgin forest to plant rice to feed his family. In a year or two, when the weak tropical soil no longer is good for grain, he will probably replace the rice with coca bushes. Coca leaves, the raw material of cocaine, are Romero's only cash crop.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American history has been shaped by stubborn and often frustrated idealists. Simon Bolivar helped liberate the colonies from Spain in the early 1800s but failed to keep them united in independence. Late in the 1980s, Costa Rica's Oscar Arias Sanchez won a Nobel Prize for pushing Nicaragua from war to peace but couldn't persuade any of his neighbors to abolish their armies. Today the region's utopian spirit is as vital as ever.
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