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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silvana Paternostro's own sister termed her book "sad and crass." She was so petrified of her parents' reaction that she did not give them a copy until the night before they got on a plane to Colombia--feeling a guilty relief that her mother does not read English. If ever a book was like a bomb, it is Paternostro's "In the Land of God and Man," an unflinching indictment of what she views as the human cost of Latin America's complex culture of male privilege--most commonly known as machismo.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1999 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Silvana Paternostro's own sister termed her book "sad and crass." She was so petrified of her parents' reaction that she did not give them a copy until the night before they got on a plane to Colombia--feeling a guilty relief that her mother does not read English. If ever a book was like a bomb, it is Paternostro's "In the Land of God and Man," an unflinching indictment of what she views as the human cost of Latin America's complex culture of male privilege--most commonly known as machismo.
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NEWS
March 9, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a speech commemorating International Women's Day, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton unveiled some details of a new, $100-million U.S. initiative to promote literacy among girls in Africa, Asia and Latin America. The plan was the first concrete measure announced at the U.N. World Summit for Social Development, a huge anti-poverty gathering here this week.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a speech commemorating International Women's Day, First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton unveiled some details of a new, $100-million U.S. initiative to promote literacy among girls in Africa, Asia and Latin America. The plan was the first concrete measure announced at the U.N. World Summit for Social Development, a huge anti-poverty gathering here this week.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | Associated Press
The problem of women having to dress the kids, wash the clothes, cook the meals, make the beds and take out the garbage--all before they go to work to earn less than men--is a worldwide inequity, according to an International Labor Organization report. Nearly everywhere in the world, women work harder and earn less than men, and the gap in many countries is widening, the report by the U.N. agency said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1995 | DAVID REYES
More than 300 people turned out for a book signing Wednesday by Isabel Allende, one of Latin America's top women writers. Allende was welcomed by Mayor Miguel Pulido, who read a proclamation naming Wednesday "Isabel Allende Day." He described her as "one of the few Latina authors" who has successfully broken into Latin America's small circle of elite writers, most of whom are men. At a reception at the Santa Ana Public Library, the Chilean-born novelist signed copies of her new book, "Paula."
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | KITTY MORSE, Kitty Morse is a writer and cookbook author living in Vista.
"Burn plant," "medicine plant," "first aid plant" and "miracle plant" all refer to the common aloe, a succulent known for its multitude of healing properties. Aloe barbadensis, commonly called aloe vera, is popularly used in the form of gels or lotions to soothe minor cuts and burns, and to calm the itch of insect bites or poison ivy.
NEWS
February 17, 1985 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, The Associated Press
African women, whose central role in food production is crucial to development on the continent, have failed to benefit from most recent government programs in their countries, a new study says. In Latin America, meanwhile, women have begun a strong movement into the cities and to the paid labor force, although marriage and motherhood remain important goals for them, according to a separate report.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ana Pizarro returned to Chile in 1991 after 17 years in exile, she offered the manuscript of a novel to a local publishing house, which rejected it. Pizarro, 53, was discouraged but not surprised. As a scholar of Latin American literature, she knew that innumerable women writers in this region had been silenced for centuries by macho-minded prejudice and rejection.
WORLD
March 8, 2006 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Mexican officials said Tuesday that they would pay a legal settlement to a woman who was prevented from having an abortion after being raped at the age of 13, a decision hailed by women's rights groups as a landmark victory. In Mexico, only rape victims or women whose lives are at risk are allowed to obtain abortions. But such women have faced innumerable bureaucratic, legal and cultural obstacles when trying to exercise that right in this overwhelmingly Roman Catholic country.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1999 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spanish-language television is dominated by cheap, mind-numbing soap operas--surely the last place Latinas would find a realistic role model. But one has been delivered to them, in the form of character Carmen Medina, a divorced mother of two girls. Last month the raven-haired Medina led "Solo en America" into its second season on Spanish-language television network Telemundo, and from one season to the next, the ratings have nearly doubled.
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