Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLatin American Art
IN THE NEWS

Latin American Art

BUSINESS
December 8, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
NEW YORK - The painting once hung in the Cleveland Museum of Art. And there was no shortage of people who wanted it in the crowded Christie's auction room. The artwork, "Women Reaching for the Moon," is a blur of a woman in a red dress. It was painted by Rufino Tamayo, the famed Mexican creator of abstract works that combine European and Latino influ- ences. Though bidding started at $500,000, it quickly reached $1 million. The standing-room-only crowd murmured as auctioneer Adrian Meyer parried with the remaining bidders, and workers wheeled in rows of extra chairs.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2000 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Museum of Latin American Art is out to educate its audience about modern art in the Southern Hemisphere. An entirely praiseworthy crusade, it does have some curious side effects. Take this latest exhibition. "Szyszlo: In His Labyrinth" represents the California museum debut of a Peruvian artist the Encyclopedia Britannica counts among that country's leading lights. Fernando de Szyszlo was born in Lima in 1925; his father was a Polish scientist, his mother a Peruvian national.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Rufino Tamayo's "Troubadour" set a world auction record for Latin American art, fetching $7.2 million. The 1945 painting, which depicts a musician strumming his guitar as two women watch, was acquired by an anonymous buyer, Christie's spokeswoman Sung-Hee Park said. The $7.2-million bid on Wednesday easily eclipsed the previous record for a Tamayo painting of $2.59 million and topped Frida Kahlo's "Roots," which sold in May 2006 for $5.6 million. "Troubadour" was the first of four paintings to be sold by Randolph College in Lynchburg, Va., to raise money.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Suzanne Muchnic >>>
Franklin Sirmans occupies a conspicuously neat space in a complex of glass-front offices at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The new head of LACMA's contemporary art department arrived in January with plenty of ideas, but it takes time to pile up the mountains of books and files that overwhelm many of his colleagues. Around the corner, Christine Y. Kim has settled in, but just barely. She joined the museum's staff last September as associate curator of contemporary art. And down the hall, another notably uncluttered office belongs to Britt Salvesen, who came aboard in October as chief of two departments: photography, and prints and drawings.
NEWS
November 9, 2006
I read with interest your substantial feature on the growing cultural community of Long Beach ["L.B., as in Lively Bash," Oct. 19] and was astonished that the single most significant cultural institution, the Museum of Latin American Art, which anchors the northeast corner of the East Village Arts District, was not even mentioned. MoLAA has been a jewel in the crown of Long Beach and a major destination for art lovers, collectors and the Latin American community. MoLAA is the only museum in the U.S. devoted exclusively to contemporary Latin American fine art, showing the likes of Tamayo, Botero and the most important living Latin American artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1999 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Time was when people looked at art mainly as a porthole to the artist's soul. Recent emphasis on ethnic heritage, however, encourages audiences to expect a sense of the artist's culture as well. This drift is particularly germane to "Gerardo Chavez: Rhythms of the Fantastic," on view at the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach. After somewhat uncertain beginnings, the Museum of Latin American Art has expanded, improved and is now a small museum to be reckoned with.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Jose Clemente Orozco was one of 20th century Mexico's great socially minded muralists. A stark 1929 easel painting made at the dawn of the Great Depression helps to show how. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art bought the modestly sized tempera and oil painting last year -- its first painting by the artist -- and today it hangs on the fourth floor of the Art of the Americas building.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010
The new curators bring a rich mix of experience and aspirations to their jobs. Here's a sampling: FRANKLIN SIRMANS Department head and curator of contemporary art at LACMA A native of New York known as a critic and writer as well as curator of the national traveling exhibition "NeoHooDoo: Art for a Forgotten Faith," which grappled with ritualistic processes and spirituality in contemporary art, Sirmans came from the Menil collection...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|