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Latin American Art

ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2000 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Museum of Latin American Art is out to educate its audience about modern art in the Southern Hemisphere. An entirely praiseworthy crusade, it does have some curious side effects. Take this latest exhibition. "Szyszlo: In His Labyrinth" represents the California museum debut of a Peruvian artist the Encyclopedia Britannica counts among that country's leading lights. Fernando de Szyszlo was born in Lima in 1925; his father was a Polish scientist, his mother a Peruvian national.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Bernard Lewin, a leading collector and dealer of Latin American art, died Jan. 30 at his home in Rancho Mirage. He was 96 and had suffered from heart problems for several months. Together with his late wife, Edith, he amassed a trove of close to 2,000 works, many of them by the best-known names in Mexican Modernist painting. In 1997, the couple donated their holdings to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, a gift that made LACMA's Latin American collection among the top in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Rufino Tamayo's "Troubadour" set a world auction record for Latin American art, fetching $7.2 million. The 1945 painting, which depicts a musician strumming his guitar as two women watch, was acquired by an anonymous buyer, Christie's spokeswoman Sung-Hee Park said. The $7.2-million bid on Wednesday easily eclipsed the previous record for a Tamayo painting of $2.59 million and topped Frida Kahlo's "Roots," which sold in May 2006 for $5.6 million. "Troubadour" was the first of four paintings to be sold by Randolph College in Lynchburg, Va., to raise money.
NEWS
November 9, 2006
I read with interest your substantial feature on the growing cultural community of Long Beach ["L.B., as in Lively Bash," Oct. 19] and was astonished that the single most significant cultural institution, the Museum of Latin American Art, which anchors the northeast corner of the East Village Arts District, was not even mentioned. MoLAA has been a jewel in the crown of Long Beach and a major destination for art lovers, collectors and the Latin American community. MoLAA is the only museum in the U.S. devoted exclusively to contemporary Latin American fine art, showing the likes of Tamayo, Botero and the most important living Latin American artists.
WORLD
April 27, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
BOGOTA, Colombia - Honored here on his 80th birthday last week with a congressional medal and dinner with the president, Colombia's most famous artist, Fernando Botero, says he'll keep working until he keels over with "a paintbrush in my hand. " But the politically attuned artist, whose themes have included mass murders, vicious drug capos and torture as well as his trademark "volumetric" nudes and whimsical reworkings of old masters, is skeptical that he will live to see the peace his countrymen so desperately want.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1999 | WILLIAM WILSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Time was when people looked at art mainly as a porthole to the artist's soul. Recent emphasis on ethnic heritage, however, encourages audiences to expect a sense of the artist's culture as well. This drift is particularly germane to "Gerardo Chavez: Rhythms of the Fantastic," on view at the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach. After somewhat uncertain beginnings, the Museum of Latin American Art has expanded, improved and is now a small museum to be reckoned with.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010
Olmec civilization emerged roughly 3,000 years ago in the eastern lowlands along Mexico's Gulf Coast in what is today the region of Veracruz and Tabasco. In many ways, it provided the foundation for all Mesoamerican art, much the way ancient Greek art did for subsequent European culture. Still, Olmec society today remains very much a mystery. For example, no one is quite sure what the monumental, 10-ton stone sculptures of helmeted human heads were used for -- although it is certain that anybody who came upon one at a time when the wheel was not yet in use and carving implements were rudimentary would know he was in the jaw-dropping presence of extraordinary power.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010
The new curators bring a rich mix of experience and aspirations to their jobs. Here's a sampling: FRANKLIN SIRMANS Department head and curator of contemporary art at LACMA A native of New York known as a critic and writer as well as curator of the national traveling exhibition "NeoHooDoo: Art for a Forgotten Faith," which grappled with ritualistic processes and spirituality in contemporary art, Sirmans came from the Menil collection...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1999
Theater The Theatricum Botanicum in Topanga Canyon finishes its season this weekend with Chekov's "The Seagull," closing Saturday at 3 p.m., and the 1892 farce "Charley's Aunt," closing Sunday at 3 p.m. Theatricum Botanicum, 1419 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Topanga. $12 to $17. (310) 455-3723.
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