Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLatin American Art
IN THE NEWS

Latin American Art

ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2007 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
The Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach has been like the downtrodden stepchild of Southern California's glamorous museum family -- often ignored by critics, overlooked by art elites and forced to work overtime for every scrap of credibility it can muster. Its location hasn't helped.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2007 | Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writer
SOMETIMES an art show's location can be as powerful and illuminating as the actual works on display. A perfectly chosen venue can transport us in time, breathe life into inanimate objects and turn a static diorama of the past (or present) into 3-D, experiential reality. It's impossible to stroll the Vatican museums or the Uffizi, admiring the Renaissance masters, without feeling the presence of a beneficently smiling Medici, or Savonarola's baleful glare.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The loan of 103 artworks for the Museum of Modern Art's "Armando Reveron" retrospective, MoMA's first solo exhibition dedicated to a Latin American painter in 50 years, shows that the Venezuelan government can cooperate with the U.S., at least on a cultural level. The shipping of works by Venezuelan Modernist Reveron (1889-1954) for the show that opened in New York on Feb.
NEWS
November 9, 2006
I read with interest your substantial feature on the growing cultural community of Long Beach ["L.B., as in Lively Bash," Oct. 19] and was astonished that the single most significant cultural institution, the Museum of Latin American Art, which anchors the northeast corner of the East Village Arts District, was not even mentioned. MoLAA has been a jewel in the crown of Long Beach and a major destination for art lovers, collectors and the Latin American community. MoLAA is the only museum in the U.S. devoted exclusively to contemporary Latin American fine art, showing the likes of Tamayo, Botero and the most important living Latin American artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2006 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
GETTING a new empire off the ground is never easy. There are territories to be secured by armies, complicated political structures to be established, populations to be subjugated, elaborate trade routes to be forged, cosmologies to be altered and much more. New ways of thinking need to be conceived, developed, inculcated and embodied -- especially about personal and social identity. And frequently, an awful lot of art needs to be made.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2006 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Every schoolkid knows that E = mc2. Einstein's assertion of an equivalence between solid mass, which can be seen and touched, and fugitive energy, which can be felt and experienced, is the centerpiece of modern physics. After atomic bombs vaporized vast swaths of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, the awesome power of the equation became a fact of daily life -- a fact soon to be wrestled with by everyone from politicians to artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic
BILLED as "the most important Latin American art auction ever held on the West Coast," a fundraiser for the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach next weekend will offer 182 works donated by artists, collectors and galleries. Oil paintings, sculptures, graphics, photography and works on paper by 153 artists -- including widely recognized masters such as Fernando Botero, Rafael Coronel and Jose Luis Cuevas -- will go on the block.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2005 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
From a silent film studio to a roller-skating rink to a senior health center to an art museum, the site of the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach has a storied past. But the tale is far from complete. The museum will unveil a sculpture garden and performing arts space today, and that's only one component of a major expansion project. "This is a museum of the living," director Gregorio Luke said of the 9-year-old institution.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2005 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Like a symphony conductor with the wonder of creativity at his fingertips, Gregorio Luke gave a special hand signal during his slide lecture on Mexican painter Diego Rivera on Saturday night. After displaying images from a single projector, he unfurled his fingers and commanded: "Enter mural." The audience gasped as the image dramatically unfolded before their eyes.
NEWS
February 24, 2005 | Andy Brumer, Special to The Times
The Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach is currently a study in the abstract and the concrete. Inside, a retrospective exhibition looks at Rufino Tamayo, one of Mexico's greatest 20th century painters, who employed abstracted forms in an attempt to break down the barriers of the imagination. Outside, workers are constructing two new gallery spaces, a sculpture garden and an educational area that will allow the museum to expand its offerings by summer.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|