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Latin American Economy

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NEWS
January 21, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For generations, Mexicans have believed that geography destined their nation to be Latin America's bulwark against Yankee imperialism. But lately, the old mission of defending sovereignty throughout the region is starting to conflict with Mexico's new role as a leader among Latin America's emerging free-market economies. These days, Mexico is extending its own economic clout southward. Mexicans dominate the Spanish-language mass media.
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BUSINESS
July 12, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American currencies and bonds dropped Wednesday as contagion from Argentina's deepening financial crisis spread. Argentina's stocks were whipsawed, with the Merval exchange average plummeting 7.1% before ending the day down 2.2%. Shaken by a treasury auction Tuesday in which Argentina was forced to sell short-term notes at exorbitant rates to refinance its debt, investors bailed on bonds across the hemisphere.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | By Chris Kraul
U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers called on the Inter-American Development Bank to reduce its financing of infrastructure projects in Latin America and take on more education projects. Inadequate education increasingly puts the region at a disadvantage with developed countries, Summers said at the IDB annual meeting in New Orleans.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 | By Chris Kraul
U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers called on the Inter-American Development Bank to reduce its financing of infrastructure projects in Latin America and take on more education projects. Inadequate education increasingly puts the region at a disadvantage with developed countries, Summers said at the IDB annual meeting in New Orleans.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1994 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accompanied by a delegation of U.S. corporate leaders, Secretary of Commerce Ronald H. Brown kicked off a five-city, three-country Latin trade mission Sunday by bringing American and Brazilian business people together in a series of meetings. Brown, whose 22-member delegation includes the heads of such Fortune 500 companies as MCI, Hughes Aircraft, UNISYS Corp. and Comstat, also met in a closed-door session with ranking Brazilian officials and Raytheon President Dennis J.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World financial leaders Thursday warned the assembled finance ministers of the Americas that a backlash against globalization could grow in Latin America unless governments find ways to reduce the region's worsening gap between rich and poor. "We are no better off than we were in the 1970s," World Bank President James D. Wolfensohn said, citing poverty data for Latin America.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American currencies and bonds dropped Wednesday as contagion from Argentina's deepening financial crisis spread. Argentina's stocks were whipsawed, with the Merval exchange average plummeting 7.1% before ending the day down 2.2%. Shaken by a treasury auction Tuesday in which Argentina was forced to sell short-term notes at exorbitant rates to refinance its debt, investors bailed on bonds across the hemisphere.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, dictators grudgingly gave way to politicians across South America during the last decade. Finally, only Gen. Augusto Pinochet, the prototype of the anti-Communist ruler-general, was left--in a country with the one of the strongest democratic traditions on the continent. Then, in the last month of the 1980s, Chile joined South America's remarkable peaceful evolution toward democracy, electing a civilian president for the first time in 19 years.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With steady economic growth and reduced inflation in 1994, Latin America enhanced its significance as a flourishing market for foreign goods and capital. An annual report issued here this week by the U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean said the region's economies grew by an average of 3.7% in 1994, while its imports surged by 15%. William R.
WORLD
March 22, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas, Los Angeles Times
President Obama said Monday that the United States has sometimes taken Latin America for granted, but that he sees the region as an increasingly important player on the world stage. Obama, in Chile at the midpoint of a five-day, three-country Latin American trip, sought to dispel views of the U.S. as an overbearing neighbor dictating terms to countries in the region. He called Latin America "a region on the move, proud of its progress, and ready to assume a greater role in world affairs," and he described the U.S. economy as deeply entwined with that of Latin America.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World financial leaders Thursday warned the assembled finance ministers of the Americas that a backlash against globalization could grow in Latin America unless governments find ways to reduce the region's worsening gap between rich and poor. "We are no better off than we were in the 1970s," World Bank President James D. Wolfensohn said, citing poverty data for Latin America.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With steady economic growth and reduced inflation in 1994, Latin America enhanced its significance as a flourishing market for foreign goods and capital. An annual report issued here this week by the U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean said the region's economies grew by an average of 3.7% in 1994, while its imports surged by 15%. William R.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1994 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accompanied by a delegation of U.S. corporate leaders, Secretary of Commerce Ronald H. Brown kicked off a five-city, three-country Latin trade mission Sunday by bringing American and Brazilian business people together in a series of meetings. Brown, whose 22-member delegation includes the heads of such Fortune 500 companies as MCI, Hughes Aircraft, UNISYS Corp. and Comstat, also met in a closed-door session with ranking Brazilian officials and Raytheon President Dennis J.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For generations, Mexicans have believed that geography destined their nation to be Latin America's bulwark against Yankee imperialism. But lately, the old mission of defending sovereignty throughout the region is starting to conflict with Mexico's new role as a leader among Latin America's emerging free-market economies. These days, Mexico is extending its own economic clout southward. Mexicans dominate the Spanish-language mass media.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, dictators grudgingly gave way to politicians across South America during the last decade. Finally, only Gen. Augusto Pinochet, the prototype of the anti-Communist ruler-general, was left--in a country with the one of the strongest democratic traditions on the continent. Then, in the last month of the 1980s, Chile joined South America's remarkable peaceful evolution toward democracy, electing a civilian president for the first time in 19 years.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1991 | ANTHONY DAY, TIMES SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
The president of the Inter-American Development Bank said Tuesday that he is "serenely optimistic" about the economic future of Latin America. Enrique V. Iglesias told a meeting of the Interamerican Press Assn. that he believes that the region is at least pulling out of the slump of the 1980s, in which it slipped backward 13 years in overall living standards. Some countries fell back 25 years, he said. Iglesias said the region's overall economic output is expected to rise by 2.4% this year.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | JAMES F. SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The stability of Latin American democracies is being threatened by a dramatic economic decline that has driven per-capita incomes below 1978 levels, the presidents of the region's major democratic countries said Saturday.
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