Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLatin Language
IN THE NEWS

Latin Language

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | NIEL WILLIAMS, THE WASHINGTON POST
You've just conquered Gaul and would like to invite that nice-looking slave over there for a cup of coffee. What to do? There's no word for cafe in Latin, the language of ancient Rome. Yes there is, or could have been, says Davide Astori. He is the insistent author of "Io Parlo Latino," or "I Speak Latin," a Latin-Italian phrase book recently released. Astori argues that if the book had been published 2,000 years ago, it would have been a snap to order a cup of espresso--cafea expressa.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2010 | Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
The words come out in abrupt breaths, as if Felipe Lopez were whispering to the chalkboard. "Rseidy. Rseidy ," he asks his students to repeat. "Learns. " "And Dizh. Dizh , say it with me, is 'language.' " In unison, the students in the UCLA classroom follow, training their tongues to the rhythm of Zapotec, an ancient language that few people in Los Angeles have ever spoken or even heard. It comes from Oaxaca, on the southern tip of Mexico, a state known for its elaborate, historic traditions.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1990 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance Saturday, it appeared that University High School had been transformed into a wild fraternity house. About 1,300 teen-agers took over the campus, dancing, blasting music, playing assorted games and, yes, wearing togas. However, these students were not interested in beer-guzzling contests or practical jokes. They were too busy answering questions about Roman history and giving speeches about Virgil's epic, "The Aeneid."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
I spent a bit of Sunday night helping my 14-year-old son study for an upcoming quiz in his Latin class. He's a freshman at a large and well-regarded school for boys. As a native Angeleno, he grew up speaking both English and Spanish, and I was interested and a little surprised that he and so many of his classmates elected Latin as their foreign language.
BOOKS
March 19, 2006 | Anthony Day, Anthony Day, former editor of The Times' editorial pages, is a contributing writer to Book Review.
THE Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus, who lived his short life in the tumultuous last years of the Roman republic, wrote some of the loveliest lyric poetry in the Latin language. Some of it was sweet and joyful, the rest moving and sad, singing to us of the poet's ancestral homeland; the love of a mistress; the death of a dear brother; the goddess Diana, revered by the Romans as the embodiment of hunting and healing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
I spent a bit of Sunday night helping my 14-year-old son study for an upcoming quiz in his Latin class. He's a freshman at a large and well-regarded school for boys. As a native Angeleno, he grew up speaking both English and Spanish, and I was interested and a little surprised that he and so many of his classmates elected Latin as their foreign language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1988 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Teacher Rebecca Ingram remembers the look on the fourth-grader's face when she told him, "Yes, the word fratricide has something to do with insecticide." The child told the San Fernando Valley teacher what insecticide means. "Killing the insect," he said. "Does fratricide mean 'killing the brother'?" the boy then asked, wide-eyed, horrified but also thrilled that he had figured out the right answer.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You're at a party. You want to appear smart, so you throw out a few French phrases. And, frankly, they fall flat. The general consensus of the crowd is that: (a) You sound pretentious. (b) You sound like Miss Piggy. The fact is, it's getting harder and harder to seem intelligent these days. (Understand we're not talking about high IQs here, just faking it successfully.
NEWS
September 1, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Tiny Moldavia on Thursday became the latest republic to rebel against the Kremlin's plea for ethnic unity in the Soviet Union when its legislature approved a new law that will make Moldavian its official language. However, the law also includes compromise language, reached after President Mikhail S. Gorbachev reportedly telephoned the Moldavian Communist Party leader this week, that allows the use of Russian in some circumstances.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1988 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer and
Teacher Rebecca Ingram remembers the look on the fourth-grader's face when she told him, yes, the word fratricide has something to do with insecticide. The child told the San Fernando Valley teacher what insecticide means. "Killing the insect," he said. "Does fratricide mean 'killing the brother'?" the boy then asked, wide-eyed, horrified but also thrilled that he had figured out the right answer.
BOOKS
March 19, 2006 | Anthony Day, Anthony Day, former editor of The Times' editorial pages, is a contributing writer to Book Review.
THE Roman poet Gaius Valerius Catullus, who lived his short life in the tumultuous last years of the Roman republic, wrote some of the loveliest lyric poetry in the Latin language. Some of it was sweet and joyful, the rest moving and sad, singing to us of the poet's ancestral homeland; the love of a mistress; the death of a dear brother; the goddess Diana, revered by the Romans as the embodiment of hunting and healing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Below a quartet of almost life-size posters of Roman gods hanging high on the walls of Irvine teacher Martha Altieri's Latin class, a discreet sign sums up why most high school students study the ancient language: "Rise above the vulgar crowd, take Latin." A hubris-ridden sentiment? Perhaps. An esoteric bunch of kids? Certainly. An extinct language? Definitely not. In fact, Latin is alive, kicking and growing in California K-12 schools.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I would make them all learn English: and then I would let the clever ones learn Latin as an honor, and Greek as a treat." --Sir Winston Churchill * Reginald Foster is an American priest, a plumber's son with a pipeline to the Vatican as chief Latinist for Pope John Paul II. Foster also teaches the faded yet apparently immortal language of Cicero and Virgil and has a standard repudiatio for those who say Latin is too difficult to learn: "Every prostitute and bum in ancient Rome spoke it. . . ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1997
Latin will be offered but not required at Long Beach's Wilson High School, which has begun a four-year transition to a rigorous, all-academic curriculum. The curriculum will require four years of a foreign language; four years of science, math, English, history and humanities-fine arts, and three years of social studies, said co-principal Al Taylor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | RUSS LOAR
For a toga party, it was a pretty tame affair. About 40 toga-clad students gathered in an Irvine high school classroom Friday for inspection and instruction by Latin teacher Martha Altieri. But it was just a warm-up for the main event March 15 and 16, when 1,400 Latin students from throughout the state are expected to descend on the Woodbridge High School campus in Irvine for the 41st annual California Junior Classical League convention.
NEWS
January 4, 1996 | NIEL WILLIAMS, THE WASHINGTON POST
You've just conquered Gaul and would like to invite that nice-looking slave over there for a cup of coffee. What to do? There's no word for cafe in Latin, the language of ancient Rome. Yes there is, or could have been, says Davide Astori. He is the insistent author of "Io Parlo Latino," or "I Speak Latin," a Latin-Italian phrase book recently released. Astori argues that if the book had been published 2,000 years ago, it would have been a snap to order a cup of espresso--cafea expressa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1988 | BOB WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Taking Latin is like taking cod-liver oil, right? It's supposed to be good for you, so you sign up for the course, even though you know it's going to be awful. The teacher will be a little old lady who never cracks a smile, and she'll make you do all those horrible conjugations, like Capiam, capies, capiet, capiemus and, uh, whatever comes next. Then she'll want you to translate something like Fidem meam obligo vexillo Civitatum. . . . But nobody talks that way anymore.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I would make them all learn English: and then I would let the clever ones learn Latin as an honor, and Greek as a treat." --Sir Winston Churchill * Reginald Foster is an American priest, a plumber's son with a pipeline to the Vatican as chief Latinist for Pope John Paul II. Foster also teaches the faded yet apparently immortal language of Cicero and Virgil and has a standard repudiatio for those who say Latin is too difficult to learn: "Every prostitute and bum in ancient Rome spoke it. . . ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1993 | MIMI KO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 1,200 students of Latin from throughout the state met at Marina High School's gym Saturday during the second day of intense competition at the 28th annual California Junior Classical League Convention. Students representing 36 high schools, 12 from Orange County, participated in a competition called Certamen (pronounced kur tah men )--an intellectual college bowl-type event--and academic testing in ancient mythology, history and Latin-related subjects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1993 | BILL BILLITER
Latin students at Marina High School are gearing up to be hosts this month of one of the biggest high school-level conventions in the state. About 1,200 Latin students from 58 high schools throughout the state will attend the California Junior Classical League convention March 19 through 21. "It's a very big job preparing for this convention, and for the students at Marina, it's something like handling a small business," said Lynn Harding, a Latin teacher at Marina.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|