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TRAVEL
August 11, 2013
FRANCE Presentation Join Adrian Kalvinskas and his family as they visit the famous and not-so-famous museums and monuments of Paris, and stroll through Montmartre and the Marais, and the Latin Quarter. Afterward, he will be on hand to answer questions about renting an apartment in Paris, traveling with children and train travel to destinations within easy reach of the city. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free.
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TRAVEL
August 11, 2013
FRANCE Presentation Join Adrian Kalvinskas and his family as they visit the famous and not-so-famous museums and monuments of Paris, and stroll through Montmartre and the Marais, and the Latin Quarter. Afterward, he will be on hand to answer questions about renting an apartment in Paris, traveling with children and train travel to destinations within easy reach of the city. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free.
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NEWS
February 4, 1986 | United Press International
Police found and defused a powerful bomb high on the Eiffel Tower, just blocks from where another explosive device blew up, injuring eight people on the fashionable Avenue des Champs Elysees, a spokesman for the tower's directors said today. A group calling itself the "Committee of Solidarity with Arab and Middle Eastern Political Prisoners" claimed responsibility for the Champs Elysees bomb in a letter to a French news agency today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The Jokers A Novel Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Anna Moschovakis NYRB Classics: 146 pp.,$14.95 paper A Splendid Conspiracy A Novel Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Alyson Waters New Directions: 216 pp., $14.95 paper Albert Cossery, who died in 2008 at age 94, ought to be a household name. He's that good: an elegant stylist, an unrelenting ironist, his great subject the futility of ambition "in a world where everything is false.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A rash of bombings in crowded and well-known places continued to terrorize the city of Paris on Wednesday, the latest blast wounding nine people in the modern shopping center built on the site of the old Les Halles food market. As fears mounted, so did speculation that the bombs were being placed by terrorists from Mideast political groups trying to bend the will of the French government.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Last year, Franco Zeffirelli's "Otello." Now, Luigi Comencini's "La Boheme." The two, thank goodness, have little in common. Zeffirelli thought nothing of second-guessing Verdi, mutilating an operatic masterpiece in the name of cinematic art. Comencini has the good sense to trust Puccini. Trust, in this case, should not imply slavish devotion. Comencini's sensitive little film, which opens Friday at the Westside Pavilion, does take a few narrative liberties. The action is pushed forward, gently, from 1830 to 1910.
TRAVEL
June 9, 1991 | ALISON CARPER, NEWSDAY
In the buoyant days of high school and college, when mortality is still an abstraction and the decades that stretch ahead sparkle with the wealth of possibility--it's easy to postpone learning the French subjunctive. In fact, I like to tell myself, it's easy to have the kind of experience with languages I had: That of a dabbler, a bit of a faker, a dreamy sort of linguistic dilettante who subscribed to the misguided belief that speaking in another tongue is a simple matter of verbal algebra.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The Jokers A Novel Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Anna Moschovakis NYRB Classics: 146 pp.,$14.95 paper A Splendid Conspiracy A Novel Albert Cossery, translated from the French by Alyson Waters New Directions: 216 pp., $14.95 paper Albert Cossery, who died in 2008 at age 94, ought to be a household name. He's that good: an elegant stylist, an unrelenting ironist, his great subject the futility of ambition "in a world where everything is false.
MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
THE VENICE HOME OF ENRIQUE MART'NEZ CELAYA ays as much about the artist's past as it does about his present life. "I look at my house as one more aspect of my work," says Mart'nez Celaya of the former art gallery. "I wanted the house to reflect my own personal sensibilities: a mixture of minimalism, which I love, but also my Spanish heritage."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Joey Bishop, the deadpan comedian who was ABC's answer to NBC's late-night talk show king Johnny Carson in the late 1960s and was the last surviving member of Frank Sinatra's legendary Rat Pack, has died. He was 89. Bishop, who had been in failing health for some time, died Wednesday night at his home in Newport Beach, according to his longtime friend, publicist Warren Cowan. An adept ad-libber with a dry, underplayed sense of humor, Bishop achieved his greatest fame in the '60s.
MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
THE VENICE HOME OF ENRIQUE MART'NEZ CELAYA ays as much about the artist's past as it does about his present life. "I look at my house as one more aspect of my work," says Mart'nez Celaya of the former art gallery. "I wanted the house to reflect my own personal sensibilities: a mixture of minimalism, which I love, but also my Spanish heritage."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican film industry is reemerging from a lengthy dry spell with witty, smart and sophisticated films that have broken box-office records at home--a promising and surprising development that's being spotlighted this week at the third annual Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival. "There is a new optimism and a lot of young people are really working hard to enter the business," said Sergio Arau, whose animated short "The Wall" will unspool at the festival, which starts today.
TRAVEL
June 9, 1991 | ALISON CARPER, NEWSDAY
In the buoyant days of high school and college, when mortality is still an abstraction and the decades that stretch ahead sparkle with the wealth of possibility--it's easy to postpone learning the French subjunctive. In fact, I like to tell myself, it's easy to have the kind of experience with languages I had: That of a dabbler, a bit of a faker, a dreamy sort of linguistic dilettante who subscribed to the misguided belief that speaking in another tongue is a simple matter of verbal algebra.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Last year, Franco Zeffirelli's "Otello." Now, Luigi Comencini's "La Boheme." The two, thank goodness, have little in common. Zeffirelli thought nothing of second-guessing Verdi, mutilating an operatic masterpiece in the name of cinematic art. Comencini has the good sense to trust Puccini. Trust, in this case, should not imply slavish devotion. Comencini's sensitive little film, which opens Friday at the Westside Pavilion, does take a few narrative liberties. The action is pushed forward, gently, from 1830 to 1910.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
A rash of bombings in crowded and well-known places continued to terrorize the city of Paris on Wednesday, the latest blast wounding nine people in the modern shopping center built on the site of the old Les Halles food market. As fears mounted, so did speculation that the bombs were being placed by terrorists from Mideast political groups trying to bend the will of the French government.
NEWS
February 4, 1986 | United Press International
Police found and defused a powerful bomb high on the Eiffel Tower, just blocks from where another explosive device blew up, injuring eight people on the fashionable Avenue des Champs Elysees, a spokesman for the tower's directors said today. A group calling itself the "Committee of Solidarity with Arab and Middle Eastern Political Prisoners" claimed responsibility for the Champs Elysees bomb in a letter to a French news agency today.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican film industry is reemerging from a lengthy dry spell with witty, smart and sophisticated films that have broken box-office records at home--a promising and surprising development that's being spotlighted this week at the third annual Los Angeles Latino International Film Festival. "There is a new optimism and a lot of young people are really working hard to enter the business," said Sergio Arau, whose animated short "The Wall" will unspool at the festival, which starts today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Madlyn Rhue, a veteran television character actress whose long battle with multiple sclerosis forced an end to her career in the mid-1990s after nearly a decade of intermittent roles performed from her wheelchair, has died. She was 68. Rhue died Tuesday after a bout with pneumonia at the Motion Picture and Television Fund hospital in Woodland Hills, a spokeswoman for the hospital said. Rhue had moved into the retirement community's long-term care facility in 1998.
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