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WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
Leftist Colombian rebels Sunday released the first of two military hostages they have promised to free, with the liberation of the other -- one of this nation's longest-held hostages -- expected Tuesday. Members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, released Josue Daniel Calvo, 23, to a team that included representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross, a Brazilian helicopter crew and leftist Sen. Piedad Cordoba, a key intermediary in other FARC hostage releases over the last two years.
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WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
Leftist Colombian rebels Sunday released the first of two military hostages they have promised to free, with the liberation of the other -- one of this nation's longest-held hostages -- expected Tuesday. Members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, released Josue Daniel Calvo, 23, to a team that included representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross, a Brazilian helicopter crew and leftist Sen. Piedad Cordoba, a key intermediary in other FARC hostage releases over the last two years.
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WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The danger signs had been mounting. The U.S. Consulate in Ciudad Juarez recently shut down for a bomb threat (which proved false). Federal police guards were redoubled. Officials working at the diplomatic mission saw their movements being gradually restricted, some parts of the city deemed too dicey to frequent. But the Americans leaving a weekend child's birthday party probably made the same calculations that many people living in Mexico make. It was broad daylight. We'll be traveling on major roads.
WORLD
March 21, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
Think of the 10 women who just had their fallopian tubes tied at a clinic in northern Colombia as foot soldiers in Erwin Goggel's lonely war on overpopulation and poverty. A film producer and heir to a dairy fortune, Goggel is offering nine-acre plots rent-free to poor men and women who agree to have vasectomies and tubal ligations. He pays for all the surgical procedures, including the 10 operations performed late last month in Monteria, the capital of Cordoba state, about 30 miles south of here.
WORLD
December 10, 2009 | By Alex Renderos
Deposed Honduran President Manuel Zelaya is negotiating plans to leave the Brazilian Embassy in the Honduran capital, where he took refuge 2 1/2 months ago, and head to Mexico, an associate said late Wednesday. The de facto government, which has threatened to arrest Zelaya, issued a safe-passage document to allow him to leave the country, said Victor Meza, who served as Zelaya's interior minister. But the plans still could go awry. Zelaya refuses to seek the political asylum that would allow him to make the trip safely, Meza said.
WORLD
December 26, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
Abortion rights activists dreamed of legislative victories across Mexico after the Supreme Court last year upheld a Mexico City law allowing abortion during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Instead, the opposite has happened. In state after state, antiabortion forces have won changes to local constitutions declaring that life begins at conception and explicitly granting legal rights to the unborn. In all, 17 state legislatures have approved such measures, often with minimal debate, since the August 2008 court decision validating Mexico City's law. The Gulf coast state of Veracruz last month became the most recent state to do so. Its measure also called on the Mexican Congress to consider a similar amendment to the nation's Constitution.
WORLD
February 21, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The highest-level meeting of U.S. and Cuban officials in Havana in years was overshadowed Saturday by a flourish of recriminations reminiscent of the Cold War-era tensions that have long polarized the two nations. The talks Friday in Havana focused on immigration issues, including visas and repatriation, part of a dialogue resumed in July after a six-year suspension. Both governments labeled the talks as positive. But on Saturday, Cuba scolded the U.S. officials, who used their visit to meet with dissidents.
WORLD
January 19, 2010 | By Tina Susman
Even by Haiti's post-earthquake standards, the little encampment on an expanse of grass next to the airport is a jarring sight. No more than 100 people strong, established beneath sheets lashed to branches driven into the ground and with a red SUV parked in its midst, it is a sign of the lengths people will go to in their search for a safe place to settle. It also sits less than half a mile from thousands of tons of medical supplies, food, water and other assistance that are pouring into Port-au-Prince's airport.
WORLD
December 13, 2009 | By Chris Kraul
As Chileans vote today for the first time since the death of dictator Augusto Pinochet, analysts say the expected victory of a conservative billionaire says more about voters' craving for better education and infrastructure than a return to authoritarian days. Sebastian Pinera, a Harvard-educated economist who owns a TV station, a soccer team and a chunk of the LAN-Chile airline, is projected to get the highest number of votes but probably not the 50%+1 he needs to avoid a runoff.
WORLD
March 1, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
Along Jasmin Street in this capital's middle-class Villa Olimpica neighborhood, residents were packing up their belongings in trucks Sunday, hauling out furniture, clothing and keepsakes from damaged and unlivable apartments. Deep cracks and crooked balconies marred the 1960s-era three-story residential buildings along the quiet street, testament to the damage from the massive earthquake that struck Chile early Saturday, stunning the nation. "It's a lot to deal with, but at least we're all safe," said Carolina Jimenez, 32, a mother of two who was forced to flee her apartment as the quake struck, collapsing a wall and sending furniture flying, slightly injuring her 11-year-old daughter.
WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The danger signs had been mounting. The U.S. Consulate in Ciudad Juarez recently shut down for a bomb threat (which proved false). Federal police guards were redoubled. Officials working at the diplomatic mission saw their movements being gradually restricted, some parts of the city deemed too dicey to frequent. But the Americans leaving a weekend child's birthday party probably made the same calculations that many people living in Mexico make. It was broad daylight. We'll be traveling on major roads.
WORLD
March 1, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
Along Jasmin Street in this capital's middle-class Villa Olimpica neighborhood, residents were packing up their belongings in trucks Sunday, hauling out furniture, clothing and keepsakes from damaged and unlivable apartments. Deep cracks and crooked balconies marred the 1960s-era three-story residential buildings along the quiet street, testament to the damage from the massive earthquake that struck Chile early Saturday, stunning the nation. "It's a lot to deal with, but at least we're all safe," said Carolina Jimenez, 32, a mother of two who was forced to flee her apartment as the quake struck, collapsing a wall and sending furniture flying, slightly injuring her 11-year-old daughter.
WORLD
March 1, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Tracy Wilkinson
Looting spread in earthquake-leveled parts of Chile on Monday even as government troops deployed in armored vehicles and on horseback to restore order and protect shipments of food and water. Scores of people were arrested for violating an overnight curfew. With the death toll creeping higher, Chile continued to reel from Saturday's massive magnitude 8.8 quake, one of the strongest on record. At least 723 people were killed, the government said, and many remained missing. Numerous oceanfront towns, like Lloca, Dichato and Constitucion, were devastated first by the quake and then, minutes later, by a tsunami, a kind of seismic coup de grace.
WORLD
February 21, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The highest-level meeting of U.S. and Cuban officials in Havana in years was overshadowed Saturday by a flourish of recriminations reminiscent of the Cold War-era tensions that have long polarized the two nations. The talks Friday in Havana focused on immigration issues, including visas and repatriation, part of a dialogue resumed in July after a six-year suspension. Both governments labeled the talks as positive. But on Saturday, Cuba scolded the U.S. officials, who used their visit to meet with dissidents.
WORLD
January 25, 2010 | By Scott Kraft
The ritual began just as the soft winter sun ducked behind the mountains Sunday, casting haunting shadows on this jittery Caribbean capital. Blackened pots bubbled with suppers of rice and beans above glowing charcoal. Sheets, cardboard mats and mattresses were laid neatly on the streets; a lucky few pitched pup tents. Chunks of rubble blocked roads to protect alfresco sleepers from passing motorists. The magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti nearly two weeks ago, and dozens of aftershocks, including a 5.9 temblor at dawn last week, has turned Port-au-Prince into a city deathly afraid of the indoors.
WORLD
January 22, 2010 | By Paul Richter
When Haiti was gripped by crisis in 1994, President Clinton sent troops to restore its exiled president to power, organized a $2.6-billion international rescue program and declared the island nation a top priority of his administration. "We should work this way whenever we can," he later wrote of the international effort in his memoir. Yet, by the end of his term, the Clinton administration's interest in Haiti had waned and its patience had worn out. Clinton ordered a halt to most direct U.S. aid, a step some experts say inflicted lasting damage on the Western Hemisphere's poorest country.
WORLD
December 10, 2009 | By Tracy Wilkinson
In the middle of his country's worst economic crisis in a generation, Mexican President Felipe Calderon on Wednesday nominated a close political ally, Finance Minister Agustin Carstens, to replace the well- respected head of the central bank. Carstens, a University of Chicago-trained economist, has serious creds in the financial world too. But he is also seen as someone willing to be more collaborative with the president than the fiercely independent outgoing Bank of Mexico director.
WORLD
January 25, 2010 | By Scott Kraft
The ritual began just as the soft winter sun ducked behind the mountains Sunday, casting haunting shadows on this jittery Caribbean capital. Blackened pots bubbled with suppers of rice and beans above glowing charcoal. Sheets, cardboard mats and mattresses were laid neatly on the streets; a lucky few pitched pup tents. Chunks of rubble blocked roads to protect alfresco sleepers from passing motorists. The magnitude 7.0 earthquake that struck Haiti nearly two weeks ago, and dozens of aftershocks, including a 5.9 temblor at dawn last week, has turned Port-au-Prince into a city deathly afraid of the indoors.
WORLD
January 19, 2010 | By Tina Susman
Even by Haiti's post-earthquake standards, the little encampment on an expanse of grass next to the airport is a jarring sight. No more than 100 people strong, established beneath sheets lashed to branches driven into the ground and with a red SUV parked in its midst, it is a sign of the lengths people will go to in their search for a safe place to settle. It also sits less than half a mile from thousands of tons of medical supplies, food, water and other assistance that are pouring into Port-au-Prince's airport.
WORLD
January 18, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
Right-wing billionaire Sebastian Pinera won Chile's runoff presidential election Sunday, defeating former President Eduardo Frei, the man he bested by a big margin in December's first round of voting. Pinera's triumph ends a 20-year hold on power by Frei's Concertacion political alliance, which is also the party of incumbent President Michelle Bachelet. The coalition has held power since Gen. Augusto Pinochet's 17-year authoritarian regime ended in 1990. Frei conceded the race when -- with 60% of the votes counted -- Pinera had tallied 51.87%.
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