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WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
Leftist Colombian rebels Sunday released the first of two military hostages they have promised to free, with the liberation of the other -- one of this nation's longest-held hostages -- expected Tuesday. Members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, released Josue Daniel Calvo, 23, to a team that included representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross, a Brazilian helicopter crew and leftist Sen. Piedad Cordoba, a key intermediary in other FARC hostage releases over the last two years.
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WORLD
March 29, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
Leftist Colombian rebels Sunday released the first of two military hostages they have promised to free, with the liberation of the other -- one of this nation's longest-held hostages -- expected Tuesday. Members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, released Josue Daniel Calvo, 23, to a team that included representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross, a Brazilian helicopter crew and leftist Sen. Piedad Cordoba, a key intermediary in other FARC hostage releases over the last two years.
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WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The danger signs had been mounting. The U.S. Consulate in Ciudad Juarez recently shut down for a bomb threat (which proved false). Federal police guards were redoubled. Officials working at the diplomatic mission saw their movements being gradually restricted, some parts of the city deemed too dicey to frequent. But the Americans leaving a weekend child's birthday party probably made the same calculations that many people living in Mexico make. It was broad daylight. We'll be traveling on major roads.
WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
The danger signs had been mounting. The U.S. Consulate in Ciudad Juarez recently shut down for a bomb threat (which proved false). Federal police guards were redoubled. Officials working at the diplomatic mission saw their movements being gradually restricted, some parts of the city deemed too dicey to frequent. But the Americans leaving a weekend child's birthday party probably made the same calculations that many people living in Mexico make. It was broad daylight. We'll be traveling on major roads.
WORLD
December 13, 2009 | By Chris Kraul
As Chileans vote today for the first time since the death of dictator Augusto Pinochet, analysts say the expected victory of a conservative billionaire says more about voters' craving for better education and infrastructure than a return to authoritarian days. Sebastian Pinera, a Harvard-educated economist who owns a TV station, a soccer team and a chunk of the LAN-Chile airline, is projected to get the highest number of votes but probably not the 50%+1 he needs to avoid a runoff.
OPINION
November 24, 1985
Frank del Olmo's column (Editorial Pages, Oct. 25), "Latino, Si--Hispanic, No," should be deeply appreciated by those familiar with longstanding U.S. policy in distinguishing between Latin-American and Hispano-American interpretations of our Western Hemispheric community-of-interests. The characterization of persons of Latin-American extraction as "Hispanics" is out of phase with what the peoples of this hemisphere have proven they respond to. Throughout World War II it was an Axis objective to cause confrontation with Pan-Americanism by promoting the lie that Hispano-Americanism more correctly reflected Latin-American sentiments.
NEWS
August 14, 1996 | CHRIS KRAUL and ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As of Tuesday, three days after Sanyo executive Mamoru Konno was abducted by armed kidnappers at a park outside Tijuana, his Japanese employer still had not filed a formal report with Mexican authorities, highlighting how Latin American kidnapping victims' families and employers often deal directly with the perpetrators. Konno was still missing, so why not inform the police?
SPORTS
March 21, 1993 | ROSS NEWHAN
He doesn't have to give his regards to Broadway or spend a full season with the animals in the Bronx Zoo. Former Angel Jim Abbott is ready to make a multiyear commitment to the New York Yankees--if and when the right offer is presented. "I don't believe in going team to team, looking for that rainbow you may never find," he said the other day. "I believe in playing for one team or as few teams as you can. That's the way the game has been passed down.
BOOKS
November 20, 1994 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
Even in our acronym-happy age, I'm not sure that anyone but Ross Thomas would have come up with VOMIT (Victims of Military Intelligence Treachery) but so he has, in AH, TREACHERY! (Mysterious Press, $21.95, 274 pp.). It is another in his unique succession of sleek, amusing, imaginative tales of duplicity, corruption, betrayal and other entertainments. His plots do not respond to easy synopsizing, but it hardly matters.
WORLD
December 13, 2009 | By Chris Kraul
As Chileans vote today for the first time since the death of dictator Augusto Pinochet, analysts say the expected victory of a conservative billionaire says more about voters' craving for better education and infrastructure than a return to authoritarian days. Sebastian Pinera, a Harvard-educated economist who owns a TV station, a soccer team and a chunk of the LAN-Chile airline, is projected to get the highest number of votes but probably not the 50%+1 he needs to avoid a runoff.
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