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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1991
Conspicuously missing from reasons given for "Latinos Lagging on Every School Level" is the bilingual program being taught primarily to Latino children. Having taught 24 years in a predominantly Latino area, it was distressing to encounter students in fourth grade, in the same school since kindergarten, still not placed in an English reading program. With limited English vocabulary and comprehension skills, there was no way, in my opinion, these students could succeed and finish high school.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Rosalio F. Munoz, a pioneering Mexican American educator who was one of the highest-ranking Latino administrators in the Los Angeles Unified School District when he retired in the 1970s, died of natural causes May 20 at his Highland Park home. He was 91. During a 26-year career with the district, Munoz used the principles of modern social work to change the way educators dealt with truancy and other problems.
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NEWS
August 6, 1989
The Long Beach Latino panel's recommendations to avoid "a bleak future" for Latino children (Times, July 16) failed to address a pertinent issue--the family's role in children's education. Mothers and fathers are more consistent role models than any that the school can provide, and the importance parents place on education equals the incentive from any teacher. Bilingual education is not the only answer, and in certain cases may slow the student's acculturation process. Some children from other than American cultures seem to do quite nicely, as reading the students' honor roll will verify, proving that language is not an insurmountable barrier when other supports are present.
OPINION
March 16, 2003 | Frank del Olmo, Frank del Olmo is associate editor of The Times.
Are Latino education activists confident enough to let a white man with a solid record as an advocate for better schools remain in office even if he is not Latino? Such an admittedly tactless query must be posed because a few months back, some potent political operatives set Los Angeles school board member David Tokofsky up for what they assumed was certain political defeat.
NEWS
September 20, 1991 | FRANK SOTOMAYOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling the improvement of education for Latinos a critical goal for the nation, President Bush on Thursday appointed a 17-member advisory commission to help him implement his 1990 executive order on Latino education. The President said the commission will "advise me and the education secretary, Lamar Alexander, on the progress of federal efforts to improve education for Hispanic-Americans." He acknowledged that the appointments, coming a year after he signed the executive order, were overdue.
NEWS
April 11, 1990
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos said in San Antonio that parents and teachers must lead the way to improve education for Latinos, a group that has a 40% dropout rate before completing high school. At the first of five hearings in the nation on Latino education, Cavazos said he supports "school-based management" in which local educators and parents have more input in education. "Parental involvement is a responsibility and also a right," Cavazos said.
NEWS
September 20, 1991 | FRANK SOTOMAYOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling the improvement of education for Latinos a critical goal for the nation, President Bush on Thursday appointed a 17-member advisory commission to help him implement his 1990 executive order on Latino education. The appointees include Robert J. Miranda, president and chief executive officer of Miranda, Strabala and Associates in Santa Ana.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Ask Norma V. Cantu what the major obstacles are to Latinos' success in school and she shoots back "language and money." The answer of Cantu, director of educational programs for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, is a succinct description of her organization's strategy in the battle to improve the dismal educational statistics for one of the nation's largest and fastest-growing minority groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2002 | DANIEL YI and JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his first visit to Orange County since taking office, President Bush swept through Santa Ana on Friday to call for more education opportunities for Latino children before heading to a political fund-raiser at a posh Dana Point hotel. The visit was part of a quick tour of California during which the president quietly campaigned for GOP gubernatorial candidate Bill Simon Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Salvadorans living in California tend to be long-term residents who are generally better educated than immigrants from Mexico, according to a UCLA study released Wednesday. Two-thirds of the state's Salvadorans have been here 14 years or more, the study said. "This is a well-established community that is here to stay," said the study's author, David Hayes-Bautista, who directs UCLA's Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2001 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Loretta Sanchez on Tuesday unveiled a $2.2-million grant for Santa Ana College as part of a federally funded program to boost higher education for Latinos. The college is among 45 higher-education institutions in the country with significant Latino populations that competed to receive $19.4 million over the next five years. Fullerton College will get $1.9 million. "The issue of educating Hispanics is not just a Hispanic issue," Sanchez (D-Garden Grove) told a crowd at Santa Ana College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latinos in Los Angeles, who often felt under siege during California's racially charged ballot initiative wars of the mid-1990s, have generally recovered their optimism, according to a Los Angeles Times poll. In the most dramatic illustration, Latinos surveyed in Los Angeles were twice as likely as whites--and much more likely than African Americans--to say quality of life has improved in the last five years. L.A.'
NEWS
March 6, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The education gap between Latinos and non-Latino whites is narrowing at the high school level but growing wider at the college level, the Census Bureau reported. The report said Latino adults are more than three times as likely as non-Latino whites to be high school dropouts. They are also nearly three times less likely to have college degrees. Overall, 57% of Latinos 25 and older are high school graduates, compared with 88% of non-Latino whites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1999 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's been recognized as one of the best government programs in the country by Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government, and it is becoming a model for educational efforts nationwide. But leaders of the 19-year-old Puente Project, a California mentoring program focusing on Latino community college and high school students, say they are still fighting for appreciation in their own backyard. Earlier this year, Puente's advocates were surprised and disappointed when Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1999
The Orange County Hispanic Education Endowment Fund on Thursday celebrated surpassing the $1-million mark by announcing a fresh goal: $2 million by the end of 2000. The fund, which has given out 150 scholarships since its inception five years ago, draws support from corporations and the Orange County Latino community, said co-chairman Ruben Smith.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1999
Mario Garcia's column ("Don't Use Test Scores to Scapegoat Latinos," June 25) made some good points about the education of the Latino population. Latinos do have unique challenges. Economic conditions, language differences and a lack of parental education are factors many Latinos must overcome to be successful in school. We must make sure that our students are performing at high levels rather than lowering standards because there are obstacles. We can do that if we realize that educating our youth is the shared responsibility of parents, teachers, administrators and students.
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