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Latino Immigrants

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1999
I agree with Robert A. Jones' Feb. 14 essay about too much immigration into our state. When I first came to Los Angeles in the 1950s, I started a column, Pan-American Panorama, for various Eastside weeklies. Practically all Latinos that I met then spoke English and not much Spanish. Now it is just the opposite. The main reason for this was the 1986 federal legalization of some 3 million illegal aliens, mostly from Latino countries. These people were invariably poorly educated and with few job skills.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - In a predawn sweep that stunned the Salinas Valley town of King City, the acting police chief, a former chief, other police employees and a towing company owner were arrested Tuesday, some on charges connected to a scheme to steal impounded cars belonging mostly to Latino immigrants, authorities said. A police sergeant was allowed to keep one impounded vehicle for every “10 to 15” he steered to a towing company owned by the brother of the acting King City police chief, according to a criminal complaint.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - In a predawn sweep that stunned the Salinas Valley town of King City, the acting police chief, a former chief, other police employees and a towing company owner were arrested Tuesday, some on charges connected to a scheme to steal impounded cars belonging mostly to Latino immigrants, authorities said. A police sergeant was allowed to keep one impounded vehicle for every “10 to 15” he steered to a towing company owned by the brother of the acting King City police chief, according to a criminal complaint.
WORLD
November 15, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The amount of money U.S. immigrants send to their families in Latin America has more than doubled since 2000, and the cash flow home -- except to Mexico -- has recovered from a considerable drop during the Great Recession, a 13-year survey of remittance trends shows. For years, remittances have far outpaced foreign aid in helping lift people out of poverty in Latin America, the study released Friday by Pew Research Center notes. In 2011, remittances totaled $53.1 billion, more than eight times the amount of official aid, the report says.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2010 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Customers jam the lime-green booth at a Latino supermarket near downtown Los Angeles. Clutching pay stubs and IDs, they're applying for small loans, enough to cover a car repair or an emergency trip to Mexico or El Salvador. Standing behind counters, tapping furiously on laptop computers, three polo-shirted account executives do the initial screening in about two minutes. "How many dependents live with you?" they ask in rapid-fire Spanish. "How often do you send money home?" Latino immigrants are at the center of one of the nation's most heated political debates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1999
In "Rediscovering a Common Bond on Immigration" (Sept. 7), Agustin Gurza equates the tragic story of the 1939 denial of entrance to Jews aboard the St. Louis with the current denial of admission of Latino illegal aliens. That is quite a logical stretch. Most illegal aliens flee their countries for economic reasons. Five billion people in the world have lower per capita incomes than Americans and could economically benefit by moving here. We must help true refugees who flee for their lives, such as those aboard the St. Louis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2000 | IRENE GARCIA
Casa Esperanza, or House of Hope, is conducting a Christmas drive to collect basic goods for poor Latino immigrants who live on Blythe Street. In years past the nonprofit social services agency, which operates out of a rundown apartment building on Blythe Street, conducted toy drives for the holidays. Last year the drive was expanded to include such items as food, clothes and diapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1993 | ERIC YOUNG
In an effort to warn Latino immigrants about fraud schemes, law enforcement and county human relations officials have created a film that urges them to overcome fear of police and to report scams. The 14-minute film, "Encrucijada" ("Crossroads"), in Spanish with English subtitles, will premiere early next month. It portrays a man who is bilked by an unscrupulous employer and ultimately reports it to the police.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2005 | Steven Bodzin, Times Staff Writer
A Latino immigrant to Los Angeles enters a community with a population in the millions, but an increasing number of immigrants crossing the southern border wind up in a very different kind of city. According to a study released Tuesday by the Pew Hispanic Center, many now go to six Southern states where Latino populations doubled, tripled or even quadrupled between 1990 and 2000.
NEWS
December 30, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It starts in the dark wilderness at the Mexican border, where illegal immigrants run a gantlet of murderous bandits and treacherous alien smugglers. When these voyagers--and even some legal immigrants--reach their destinations to the north, more danger can follow: * An Immigration and Naturalization Service agent is arrested and charged with allegedly abducting and sexually assaulting six women on the streets of Los Angeles, then threatening them with deportation if they turned him in.
OPINION
May 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The Senate Judiciary Committee took up comprehensive immigration reform late last week. And, as expected, opponents are already rushing to derail it, arguing that any bill that legalizes the vast majority of undocumented immigrants in the United States will cost billions of dollars and place an unfair burden on taxpayers. Such arguments are merely scare tactics. There's no doubt that granting citizenship to millions of immigrants 13 years from now, as the Senate bill would, will carry a cost, but how much is unclear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2013 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO -- The Napa Valley Community Foundation on Tuesday announced it would invest $1 million over the next three years to help the county's legal immigrants become U.S. citizens. The initiative comes a year after the release of a comprehensive analysis of Napa County's immigrant community commissioned by the foundation and conducted by the Washington, D.C.-based Migration Policy Institute. Findings from that 83-page analysis were used as a launching point for a series of discussions with community and business groups across the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2013 | By Cindy Chang and Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
Under the immigration bill proposed by a bipartisan group of senators, Maria Galvan could achieve her dream of opening a hair salon in Southern California. She has spent more than a decade doing odd jobs, barred from getting the required business license because she is in the country illegally. "It makes me happy to know we're being heard," said Galvan, 43, who is originally from Mexico City. "If this happens, it will be such a relief. " The path to citizenship as laid out in the bill is a lengthy one. Jose Cruz, a day laborer from Guatemala looking for work outside a Los Angeles Home Depot, said he was willing to wait.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2013 | By Rick Rojas and Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
Yesenia Rojas, vibrant in her purple shawl, sang with a voice so powerful it rose above the rest of the procession as they shuffled down the damp Anaheim sidewalk. " Era mexicana. Era mexicana, " they sang with a statue of Our Lady of Guadalupe hoisted high, candlelight and street lamps illuminating their way. " Madrecita de los mexicanos. " The singsong serenade lauds the patroness, the mother of all Mexicans. On this drizzly evening, Rojas led the group down Anna Drive, where she and her family have made their home.
OPINION
November 20, 2012 | By John M. Ackerman
President Obama increased his appeal among Latino voters from 67% to 71% in four years despite the fact that he reneged on his central 2008 campaign promise to "fix our broken immigration system. " This overwhelming support may actually undermine the cause of immigration reform, because it tells the Democrats that the Latino vote is solidly on their side regardless of specific policy stances. This has the dangerous consequence of handing the issue over to the Republicans and their exclusionary, divide-and-conquer approach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
In the nearly two decades since Californians voted to bar undocumented immigrants from utilizing public schools and hospitals, the state's electorate has become increasingly tolerant toward people who are in the country illegally, although it remains tough on border security and enforcement, a new USC Dornsife/ Los Angeles Times poll shows. The shift is partly explained by the growing clout of Latinos, who now make up 20% of California voters. But the attitudes of whites also appear to have changed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As he drives his produce truck down Golden Avenue in western Long Beach, constantly on the lookout for regular customers, Pablo Hernandez faces a dilemma. If he honks his horn like he used to, customers may stream out of apartment buildings to buy his eggs, tortillas and bananas. But condominium owners nearby also might call the police. Hernandez's hesitation underscores the competing needs of a neighborhood in flux.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Ignacio Mata has been a legal resident of the United States since 1955. He has raised a family in Los Angeles, sending three daughters to college. He pays taxes. But he has never voted. Officially still a Mexican national, he cannot cast a ballot in the country where he plans to spend the rest of his life. Prodded by his daughter for years, Mata finally affixed his signature to an application for citizenship the other day.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano and Dalina Castellanos, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department has sued Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Arizona, asking a federal court to prevent the brazen and outspoken lawman from racially profiling Latinos, abusing them in his jails and retaliating against his critics. "The police are supposed to protect and support our community, not divide them," said Assistant Atty. Gen. Thomas E. Perez, head of the Justice Department's civil rights division. "This is an abuse of power case involving a sheriff and a sheriff's office that has ignored the Constitution.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
At least in some parts of Arizona's Maricopa County -- especially in predominantly Latino communities -- a collective sigh of relief was let out Thursday as people learned of the Department of Justice's lawsuit against Sheriff Joe Arpaio. “People have been saying, 'Finally, justice has come,' ” Maricopa County Supervisor Mary Rose Wilcox told the Los Angeles Times. Justice officials allege that Arpaio and his Phoenix law enforcement department exercised a pattern of abuse and racism against Latinos, especially immigrants.
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