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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only major consumer groups to support Insurance Commissioner Roxani Gillespie over the last year broke with her on Tuesday, accusing her of reneging on promises to combat redlining and to work for affordable auto insurance for minorities and the poor. Leaders of Public Advocates Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only major consumer groups to support Insurance Commissioner Roxani Gillespie over the last year broke with her on Tuesday, accusing her of reneging on promises to combat redlining and to work for affordable auto insurance for minorities and the poor. Leaders of Public Advocates Inc.
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OPINION
October 1, 1989
Your editorial "Take Another Stab at No-Fault" (Sept. 24) may have given some readers the impression that when Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) dropped no-fault from his auto insurance bill (AB 2315), this stopped work on my no-fault bill (AB 354). While it is true the Speaker grafted some of the basic no-fault provisions from my bill onto his bill before he asked the Assembly to pass it, once in the Senate the no-fault amendments were quickly removed. Although my bill stalled this year, it is still very much alive.
OPINION
October 1, 1989
Your editorial "Take Another Stab at No-Fault" (Sept. 24) may have given some readers the impression that when Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) dropped no-fault from his auto insurance bill (AB 2315), this stopped work on my no-fault bill (AB 354). While it is true the Speaker grafted some of the basic no-fault provisions from my bill onto his bill before he asked the Assembly to pass it, once in the Senate the no-fault amendments were quickly removed. Although my bill stalled this year, it is still very much alive.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
No one could fault Justice Cruz Reynoso if he had quietly dropped from public view after the bitter election of November, 1986, in which he and two other members of the state Supreme Court were turned out of office by the voters. The rough campaign thrust Reynoso, Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird and Justice Joseph R. Grodin into unaccustomed and uncomfortable roles as political candidates, trying to defend their judicial records in the 30-second television commercials that are the mainstays of today's electioneering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several environmental groups joined in a lawsuit filed Wednesday against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, contending that the plan it approved to clean the air in the San Joaquin Valley was weak. The plan was the first approved by the EPA to target particulate matter, a chronic problem in the valley. The tiny specks, mostly from dust and diesel engine emissions, have been linked to asthma, other serious respiratory problems and even death.
NEWS
September 15, 1988
Mayors of California's six largest cities were urged to require law firms with whom they do business to reveal the number of racial minorities the firms employ as lawyers. In a letter to Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley and others, the Latino Issues Forum, a San Francisco-based civil rights group, called for adoption of a "truth in bidding" policy that also would require law firms to state their goals for increasing the number of minorities holding positions as partners.
NEWS
January 14, 1989 | MIKE SHEAR, Times Staff Writer
A group representing more than 80 immigrant organizations in California met Friday with U.S. Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh to urge the creation of a "Bureau of Citizenship" that would operate separately from the Immigration and Naturalization Service. "The idea is to separate the promotion of citizenship from the same agency that has a built-in fear for immigrants because it is basically an enforcement agency," said John Gamboa, executive director for the Latino Issues Forum.
NEWS
September 24, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consumer advocate Ralph Nader and Proposition 103 author Harvey Rosenfield released charts Monday showing that insurance industry lobbying costs in California in 1989 and 1990 exceeded $19 million, not including campaign contributions to legislators or the cost of lawyers engaged in anti-Proposition 103 lawsuits. Spending by insurers vastly exceeded lobbying costs of the California Trial Lawyers Assn., with which Nader and Rosenfield are aligned in fighting proposals for no-fault auto insurance.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assembly Speaker Willie Brown Friday assailed "grass-roots, nonprofit, do-good organizations," including the Consumers Union and Latino Issues Forum, for reportedly accepting insurance industry funds to pay for an advertising campaign for the no-fault auto insurance bill now pending in the state Senate. A Consumers Union official denied, however, that the organization has taken any industry money.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
No one could fault Justice Cruz Reynoso if he had quietly dropped from public view after the bitter election of November, 1986, in which he and two other members of the state Supreme Court were turned out of office by the voters. The rough campaign thrust Reynoso, Chief Justice Rose Elizabeth Bird and Justice Joseph R. Grodin into unaccustomed and uncomfortable roles as political candidates, trying to defend their judicial records in the 30-second television commercials that are the mainstays of today's electioneering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1991 | GREG HERNANDEZ
Latinos from various businesses, grass-roots groups and human rights organizations vowed Friday to work toward getting a Latino appointed to the state's Public Utilities Commission so that the telecommunications needs of their population can be better addressed. "If we are not there at the Public Utilities Commission, how can they be aware of what our concerns are?"
BUSINESS
January 28, 1999 | Elizabeth Douglass
State regulators wrapped up five days of hearings into allegations that Pacific Bell's sales methods are misleading and result in customers being signed up for services they do not want or need.
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