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BUSINESS
June 7, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Businesses, corporations or advertising executives pondering entry to the vast and growing Latino market can attend a two-day conference with leading market experts June 15 and 16 at the Loews Santa Monica Beach Hotel. The event, which costs $1,595, is hosted by the Strategic Research Institute and reads like a who's who in cutting-edge thinking about the Latino consumer.
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BUSINESS
September 22, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
The long spell of hot weather may have frayed nerves and fried the Southland, but Rudy Aguado is smiling because his Fruiti Pops fruit bars are more popular than ever. Business has been booming so much for the small maker of paletas that Aguado, 60, has had to leave his desk job to drive truckloads of fruit bars to a distributor. His two dozen workers are too busy in his Santa Fe Springs factory making the bars. "We've been working around the clock," Aguado said. "So sometimes I got to step in. " This summer's heat was expected to help boost Fruiti Pops Inc. sales 14% for this year to $2.4 million from $2.1 million last year, he said.
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FOOD
April 3, 1986 | DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writer
The nation's food industry is encountering a few unexpected stumbling blocks as it rushes to embrace the Latino consumer dollar. In fact, numerous advertisements and promotions aimed at this increasingly influential ethnic group came under fire here for being inaccurate or insensitive. The forum for the criticism was a recent three-day conference entitled, "How to Reach the Hispanic Consumer," sponsored by the Mexican-American Grocers Assn.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2011 | By Megan Kimble
The gig: Martha de la Torre is the chief executive and co-founder of El Clasificado, a Spanish-language publication distributed weekly throughout Southern California. The 60-page directory of classified ads is targeted to Latino immigrants and functions as a "Spanish-language PennySaver," said De la Torre, 53. The privately held company posted $16 million in sales last year, up 8% from 2009, she said. It has 130 employees. Reluctant entrepreneur: Born to Ecuadorean immigrants who settled in the South Bay, De la Torre enrolled in Loyola Marymount University's accounting program.
REAL ESTATE
October 13, 2002 | Mary Umberger, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO -- The real estate industry just got a couple more reminders to sign up for Spanish lessons. But it's not as if the message hasn't been left before. For years, demographic soothsayers have urged the housing industry to take seriously the riches that could be mined by marketing its products and services to immigrants, particularly Latinos. The latest reminder comes from Pepperdine University, which has released a study of Latino housing demand.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1995 | JACK SEARLES
A new advertising and marketing firm, Rodriguez Communications, has been established in Ventura to help client companies gain access to the nation's Latino market. The firm is headed by Alex Rodriguez, a former special-events manager at Hispanic Business, a Santa Barbara-based magazine. He says he has lined up a network of advertising and marketing experts who will help his agency sell products and services across the country.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2011 | By Megan Kimble
The gig: Martha de la Torre is the chief executive and co-founder of El Clasificado, a Spanish-language publication distributed weekly throughout Southern California. The 60-page directory of classified ads is targeted to Latino immigrants and functions as a "Spanish-language PennySaver," said De la Torre, 53. The privately held company posted $16 million in sales last year, up 8% from 2009, she said. It has 130 employees. Reluctant entrepreneur: Born to Ecuadorean immigrants who settled in the South Bay, De la Torre enrolled in Loyola Marymount University's accounting program.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1998 | Associated Press
A seven-county region of California has been identified as the nation's largest Latino market, with spending amounting to $57 billion annually. The Los Angeles area market--Inyo, Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties--surpassed the New York and Miami markets in population and spending, according to the 1998 U.S. Hispanic Market study conducted by Strategy Research Corp. of Miami, a subsidiary of Chicago-based Market Facts Inc. The L.A. area market has about 6.
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
Where else but in her beloved New Mexico would schoolteacher Natalia Colon want to spend a summer? How about in the roller-coaster biceps of Rafael Montalvo? Pretty caliente, huh? Well, there's more. But you'll have to wait till summer 1999 for the rest of Hebby Roman's 400-page Latino romance novel. That's when her "Suenos De Verano" will hit bookstores, along with three other titles, published in English and Spanish by Kensington Publishing Corp.'s new imprint Encanto, or enchantment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1991 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From his wooden desk, Fernando Velo, the 42-year-old editor and publisher of Azteca News, can look out the office window and see the publishing battle going on in downtown Santa Ana. It is here, amid the bustle of Mexicans, Cubans, Guatemalans and other Latino immigrants, that hundreds of stacks of newspapers are dropped off at markets, restaurants and liquor stores. And with each new reader and new advertiser, the battle lines are redrawn in Orange County's war of Spanish-language newspapers.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Spanish-language media giant Univision Communications Inc. plans to launch three new cable television channels next year in a bid to tighten its grip on the growing Latino market and diversify its revenues. Univision is expected to announce Thursday that one of the channels will offer soccer and other sports, one will be devoted to news and information, and a third will showcase the spicy Spanish-language soap operas, or telenovelas , that fuel Univision Network's prime-time ratings.
SPORTS
March 30, 2011 | By Dylan Hernandez
As he did 30 years ago, Fernando Valenzuela will take the mound at Dodger Stadium on opening day. From the very place he started a phenomenon that radically altered the country's cultural and sporting landscape, Valenzuela will throw the ceremonial first pitch before the Dodgers face the San Francisco Giants on Thursday. Fernandomania will return to Los Angeles -- but with a notable difference. When he winds up to throw the ball, Valenzuela won't look skyward the way he used to. "I can't do it if I think about it. I would fall down, especially if I'm wearing street shoes," he said, laughing.
SPORTS
February 15, 2011 | By Kevin Baxter
The Lakers just scored a slam dunk in the Latino market. On Monday the team announced a 20-year agreement with Time Warner Cable to create the nation's first Spanish-language regional sports network, with the Lakers as its centerpiece, starting with the 2012-13 season. The groundbreaking partnership is just the latest in a series of efforts by the Lakers and the NBA as they reach out to the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. population. "If you're not able to connect with [Latinos]
SPORTS
January 29, 2010
The NFL has made inroads with a Latino population that accounts for nearly one in six U.S. residents over the age of 2. However, only a handful of current NFL stars claim Latin heritage, including Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo, Bears offensive lineman Roberto Garza and Lions guard Manny Ramirez, who are all Mexican American, and San Diego Chargers defensive lineman Luis Castillo, whose parents are Dominican. All were born in the United States. Other facts and figures about the NFL and the U.S. Latino market, provided by the league: NFL telecasts averaged 1.1 million Latino viewers during the 2009 regular season, the best numbers since 2003.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2009 | Reed Johnson
In addition to the roar of car engines and the blast of automatic weapons fire, there's another sound in "Fast & Furious" that's been integral to the franchise's success: Spanish-language dialogue and accents.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2007 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Eighteen-year-old Brian Morales represents a growing segment of America that baffles advertisers, broadcast networks and cable channels. The Santa Monica College freshman listens to Metallica and Linkin Park on his iPod. He also likes rock en espanol such as La Ley and Mana. His favorite TV show is the sci-fi drama "Heroes" on NBC and he tunes in to Univision to watch news and soccer with his dad. He's equally at ease in English and Spanish. "My culture is not ordinary.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1998 | CHRISTY HAUBEGGER, Christy Haubegger is president of Latina Publications, which publishes Latina, a monthly magazine
The television networks recently announced their new fall lineups amid much fanfare. But I'm not dusting off the pompoms just yet ("And in This Corner . . . ," Calendar, May 23). There are going to be even fewer Latinos on prime-time television than last year. By the Census Bureau's count, the population of 30 million Latinos in the United States now easily outnumbers Canadians in Canada and has doubled since 1980. But according to prime-time television, we seem to be approaching extinction.
REAL ESTATE
April 20, 1997 | KAREN E. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Ernesto Diaz was 6, he and his nine brothers and sisters made their way with their parents from Durango, Mexico, to the border towns of Mexicali and Tijuana to work and obtain the legal papers they needed to enter the United States. By 1960, they had gotten legal clearance to immigrate to Southern California, but they quickly faced a new challenge. "With 12 people in the family, nobody wanted to rent to my parents, so we had to buy a house," Diaz recalled.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2006 | E. Scott Reckard, Times Staff Writer
Two new banks primarily owned by Latinos and focused on Latino-owned small businesses are opening this week in downtown Los Angeles and Glendale. Promerica Bank on Figueroa Street downtown and Americas United Bank on Brand Boulevard in Glendale are the first commercial banks in the area in the last 30 years to open with a focus on the Latino market. The independently organized banks each raised about $30 million in start-up capital, with most of the money coming from Latinos.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2006 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
At Walt Disney Co., Chief Executive Robert Iger has made the mandate clear: Reaching the expanding Latino audience is a top priority for the Burbank-based entertainment giant. The company's theme park, cable and broadcast groups each have made inroads, creating Spanish-language sports channels through ESPN, TV shows starring Latinos for the ABC network and bicultural "Cinderella"-themed contests for Latina teens.
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