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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1992
What law school did Rodriguez go to? To say everybody of similar heritage should think alike is a throwback to the racists politics that brought us to this mess. It is time to recognize we are all individuals and not lump people together for convenience. It is Gloria Molina's individual chutzpah that would make her a great candidate for mayor. STUART RAPEPORT Los Angeles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2014 | By Abby Sewell and Paul Pringle
A federal grand jury in Washington took testimony last year about then-U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis' role in a 2012 fundraiser for President Obama's reelection, according to a woman who said she appeared before the panel. Whittier resident Rebecca Zapanta, who is prominent in Latino political and philanthropic circles, told The Times she was summoned to testify in June about telephone conversations she had with Solis, now a leading candidate for an open seat on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.
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OPINION
March 17, 2002 | GREGORY RODRIGUEZ, Gregory Rodriguez, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a senior fellow at the New America Foundation.
For U.S. Latinos, more than two-thirds of whom are either immigrants or the children of immigrants, the past decade has been a period of firsts. Every week or so, it seems, there is a story about the first Latino to do this or that. But the cultural significance of these history-making feats is not always profound. Actually, it's mostly skin deep. Last Tuesday, Tony Sanchez, a $600-million oilman who traces his Southwestern roots to 18th-century Spain, made history by defeating Dan Morales, a third-generation Mexican American former state attorney general, to win the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in Texas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
STOCKTON - Sunburned, muddy and aching, Jose Hernandez was flopped in the back seat of the family's old Mercury with his brothers and sister when his father asked about their day in the fields, picking cucumbers. "Tiring," Hernandez, just a boy at the time, recalled answering. "My father said, 'Good! I'm not going to force you to go to school or get good grades or go to college. But if you don't, you know what your life is going to be like.'" It was a hard lesson from a father who spent years toiling in the fields of the Central Valley, migrating back and forth from Michoacán, Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1997 | BILL BOYARSKY
In the maze of Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre's political and personal life, an invisible line separates people who think they are insiders from those who are really in. Alatorre will ask for a difficult favor--putting a friend on the payroll, taking care of a buddy--something that seems to strain ethical boundaries, or violate plain good sense. It's a test. Alatorre may shrug it off if you turn him down. You may remain friends. But you're out of the club's inner circle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1999 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The patriarch of Latino politics in California is sick and tired but still holding forth, seated at the kitchen table of his bright Spanish stucco house in Pasadena. Battling illness and old age, Edward R. Roybal, 84, sounds like a grandfather giving a scolding. Sure, Roybal says, Latinos have come a long way. There are 30 times as many Latino lawmakers in California as when he first took office 50 years ago. The Assembly speaker is Mexican American. So is the lieutenant governor.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congressman Esteban E. Torres, the La Puente Democrat, is setting up an informal exploratory committee to gauge his chances. Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre is openly courting the race. And Councilwoman Gloria Molina, herself interested, calls the potential power "marvelous." All of this for a political contest that, as yet, is only scheduled in the dreams of Los Angeles County Latinos. No one knows if it will be--much less when.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1992 | ANTONIO H. RODRIGUEZ, Antonio H. Rodriguez is a lawyer in Los Angeles. and
The split between the political groups of Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina, on one side, and State Sen. Art Torres and Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre, on the other, is hurting the Chicano/Mexicano community's struggle for justice. They ought to put aside their differences in the interest of our community. The split is rooted in the history of the Democratic Party's poor record of support for our community, especially our demands for equal representation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1990 | RODOLFO ACUNA, Rodolfo Acuna is a professor of Chicano studies at Cal State Northridge.
The political enemies of the late U.S. Sen. Joseph Montoya of New Mexico once published a list of his relatives who were on the public payroll. They thought they had scored a direct hit. But rather than embarrass the patriarch, the list demonstrated to his New Mexican constituents what a good man Montoya was--he took care of his family. As a rule, Latino politicians in Los Angeles don't put members of their political families--longtime aides as well as relatives--on the public payroll.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa and state Sen. Richard Polanco will become the latest marquee political names to declare their loyalties in the fiercely contested race for the Eastside's 14th City Council District seat today, when they formally endorse Victor Griego. The speaker and the influential senator will join Assemblywoman Gloria Romero and City Councilman Mike Hernandez as Griego backers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2011 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Andre Pineda, a Democratic pollster and expert on the burgeoning clout of Latino voters, died this week. He was 46. He died Tuesday after jumping off Pasadena's Colorado Street Bridge. Pineda, a native of South Pasadena, built an international campaign practice on the strength of his experience in several facets of electioneering, including direct-mail and field organization as well as opinion polling. His clients included a number of corporations and philanthropic groups along with a roster of Democratic candidates and causes.
OPINION
August 28, 2010
On Aug. 29, 1970, between 20,000 and 30,000 Latinos took to the streets of East L.A., marching down Whittier Boulevard for a mass rally at Laguna Park. It was an intoxicating moment, old-timers say. High school students and farmworkers, families and college kids had united for a peaceful afternoon of music and speeches. They were calling for equal opportunity and justice: respectful treatment from law enforcement, fair wages and working conditions from employers, a decent education and an end to the Vietnam War. It was a time when the nation was wrestling with civil rights issues, and Los Angeles was no different.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2008 | Miguel Bustillo and Richard Fausset, Times Staff Writers
Fabiola Pena considered running away from her factory job when she realized she was being targeted in a federal immigration raid. She was deterred when she noticed the helicopters hovering overhead. But helicopters were not what shocked Pena the most on her last, fateful day at Howard Industries, the largest employer in this small Southern town. It was the black co-workers who clapped and cheered, Pena said, as she and hundreds of other Latino immigrant laborers were arrested and hauled away.
OPINION
June 24, 2007 | Harold Meyerson, HAROLD MEYERSON is executive editor of the American Prospect and a columnist for the Washington Post.
IS AN INFORMAL COMPACT that has helped keep racial tensions from boiling over in Los Angeles about to end? Are Latinos on the verge of displacing the region's black elected officials? On Tuesday, voters in the Southern part of Los Angeles County will decide a special election that may mark an end to the delicate balance of power between L.A.'s black and Latino political elites.
OPINION
March 18, 2007 | Kenneth P. Miller, KENNETH P. MILLER is an assistant professor of government at Claremont McKenna College. Miller, along with researcher Justin Levitt, is the author of the study "The Dimensions and Limits of Realignment in California's Central Valley."
FOR MORE than a decade, California Republicans have endured hard political times. Aside from the governorship of Arnold Schwarzenegger, the party has had few electoral successes since the mid-1990s. The GOP can take some heart, however, from developments in one region of California: the San Joaquin Valley, where a partisan realignment has quietly taken place. As measured by two-party registration, Republicans are now the majority for the first time since the Depression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2005 | George Ramos, Special to The Times
Edward R. Roybal, who championed the rights of the underprivileged and the elderly during 30 years in the House of Representatives and was the mentor to scores of Latino lawmakers in Los Angeles, died Monday. He was 89. Roybal, who had a pioneering role in the city's politics, died of respiratory failure complicated by pneumonia at Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, according to an announcement from the office of his daughter, Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-East Los Angeles).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2005 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
When Latino leaders gathered recently to celebrate the election of Antonio Villaraigosa as mayor of Los Angeles, White House aide Ruben Barrales told them it was great to welcome "a dynamic Latino leader" with "unlimited political potential." "But enough about Alex Padilla," he concluded, nodding at the Los Angeles City Council president.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2003 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
In a sign of growing Latino political clout, more than half of the Democratic presidential contestants traveled to the sweltering desert Saturday to pitch themselves to a gathering of elected Latino leaders from across the country. Sprinkling in phrases in Spanish, the candidates repeatedly circled back to criticism of President Bush's economic plan, urging repeal of some or all of the administration's $1.7 trillion in tax cuts.
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