Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLatino Theater Initiative
IN THE NEWS

Latino Theater Initiative

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 27, 1993
I am pleased that the Mark Taper Forum is starting the Latino Theater Initiative for the next four years ("Creating a Forum for Latino Audiences," Oct. 28). Funded by the Lila Wallace-Readers Digest Fund for $1.4 million, this should open the way for the Latino community to really take an interest in local theater. It is about time! The entire Music Center complex has been an Anglo-dominated operation for as long as I can remember. The large portion of the city population that is Latino has never felt comfortable in it either as customers or participants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 27, 1993
I am pleased that the Mark Taper Forum is starting the Latino Theater Initiative for the next four years ("Creating a Forum for Latino Audiences," Oct. 28). Funded by the Lila Wallace-Readers Digest Fund for $1.4 million, this should open the way for the Latino community to really take an interest in local theater. It is about time! The entire Music Center complex has been an Anglo-dominated operation for as long as I can remember. The large portion of the city population that is Latino has never felt comfortable in it either as customers or participants.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR
Hundreds of young bards gathered in the auditorium at Skirball Cultural Center on Monday for a reading of their first works by professional actors. Funded by the Skirball Foundation and sponsored by the Audrey Skirball-Kenis Theater Project, the program is free to participating schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1998 | JAN BRESLAUER
This may be the season of conspicuous getting and giving, but there's a certain kind of gift giving that goes on all year. It's called philanthropy, and in the world of nonprofit theater, the grants that are its most common form are no less than lifeblood. Without grants, after all, many small and mid-size organizations would die. Likewise, larger institutions would have to cut back on a range of vital programs, including education and community outreach.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First there was Homer. And then the Beats. And now come all the rest. "Shouts & Whispers," Tuesday through April 11, brings together voices from every area code in the city for a three-day festival of spoken-word performances at Cal State Northridge. But don't let the academic setting fool you: This is no staid, ivory-tower blank verse. Is it poetry? Yes. Is it storytelling? Yes. Is it performance art? Yes. All that and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1999
Visual Arts / Museums Bowers Museum of Cultural History 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, 92706; (714) 567-3600; Tue.-Sun., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Peter C. Keller, president. Background: The Bowers Memorial Museum opened in 1936 as a city-run museum devoted to the history of Orange County; closed in the mid-1980s, the museum reopened in 1992 as the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2004 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
When the curtain finally went up this month on the Ricardo Montalban Theatre, the long-awaited debut spotlighted the hard-fought progress made by L.A.'s perennially struggling Latino theater. But at the same time, the clumsy unveiling ceremony also resurrected old doubts about its future.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley, David C. Nichols, Daryl H. Miller
With the characteristic assurance seen in such previous efforts as the acclaimed "Orson's Shadow," director Matt Shakman smooths the way for Adam Stein's turbulent new play "Angry" at the Black Dahlia Theatre. The action -- set, at a best guess, in the 1980s -- takes place in an idyllic suburban neighborhood, complete with a celestial backdrop of blue skies in Andrea Finn's nicely wry scenic design.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1993 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer.
They call him Lemon Man. Video artist Susan Mogul caught him in the act of stealing a lemon off a tree near Armando's Mexican restaurant in Highland Park. Mogul asked to interview him, but he saw her video camera and thought she was a police officer, presumably out to bust him for grand theft, citrus. The combination of cops and video cameras--both powerful symbols in post-riot Los Angeles--proved too much for Lemon Man. He fled. No one knows whether Lemon Man will attend the 1993 Los Angeles Festival, or whether he will ever come back to Armando's.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|