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Latino Walk Of Fame

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997
Hollywood has its Walk of Fame. Watts has the Promenade of Prominence. And notable names are now being emblazoned on East Los Angeles sidewalks with the creation of the Latino Walk of Fame. The first plaque was placed on Whittier Boulevard recently, honoring the Whittier Boulevard Merchants Assn., organizers of the Latino Walk of Fame. Cesar Chavez, founder of the United Farm Workers union, will be the first person to be honored.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998
Jaime Escalante, who gained fame when his success teaching Garfield High School students and was portrayed in the 1987 film "Stand and Deliver," was honored Wednesday with a sun-shaped plaque on the Latino Walk of Fame in East Los Angeles. Organizers said Escalante was selected for the "tremendous impact he has had on education."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1997
With mariachis playing, East Los Angeles residents and merchants celebrated as farm worker leader Cesar Chavez was honored with the first plaque on the Latino Walk of Fame. About 100 people crowded a small stretch of Whittier Boulevard where officials unveiled the gold and red granite plaque emblazoned with Chavez's name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1997
With mariachis playing, East Los Angeles residents and merchants celebrated as farm worker leader Cesar Chavez was honored with the first plaque on the Latino Walk of Fame. About 100 people crowded a small stretch of Whittier Boulevard where officials unveiled the gold and red granite plaque emblazoned with Chavez's name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1998
Jaime Escalante, who gained fame when his success teaching Garfield High School students and was portrayed in the 1987 film "Stand and Deliver," was honored Wednesday with a sun-shaped plaque on the Latino Walk of Fame in East Los Angeles. Organizers said Escalante was selected for the "tremendous impact he has had on education."
NEWS
April 2, 2000 | AL RIDENOUR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tourists visiting Los Angeles last week for the academy shindig were frequently spotted hanging their heads. But not because they were upset . . . they were sightseeing. Throughout Southern California, there are more than two dozen tourist-attracting "walks of fame" and assorted sidewalk tributes paying homage not only to thespians, but to musicians, athletes, and even cats and dogs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1989 | GEORGE RAMOS
Whittier Boulevard, East Los Angeles' major business district, is making a comeback. Merchants along the one-mile stretch of the boulevard between Eastern Avenue and Atlantic Boulevard are wearing smiles these days because of brisker business during the holidays. Many of them reported increases in receipts ranging from 6% to 14% over last year. "People are rediscovering us," said Leon Vargas, who manages a medical center on the boulevard. "We're doing quite well." That wasn't always the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Let's take a trip down Whittier Boulevard!" --The Midnighters, 1966 **** Whittier Boulevard was once the place to see and be seen in East Los Angeles, a bustling street that teemed with shoppers and teenagers cruising by in low-riding Chevys. But battered by a 1970 riot during a Vietnam War protest, the mile-long retail district never recovered its former glory despite several efforts to revitalize the strip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1997
Hollywood has its Walk of Fame. Watts has the Promenade of Prominence. And notable names are now being emblazoned on East Los Angeles sidewalks with the creation of the Latino Walk of Fame. The first plaque was placed on Whittier Boulevard recently, honoring the Whittier Boulevard Merchants Assn., organizers of the Latino Walk of Fame. Cesar Chavez, founder of the United Farm Workers union, will be the first person to be honored.
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