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Latinos Orange County

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fernando Rojas, 31, sat huddled with his two daughters at a table inside a hall here Thursday and explained to them the meaning of Las Posadas, a holiday tradition of Mexican Catholics that symbolizes Joseph and Mary's journey to Bethlehem. "I think it's important to keep the Mexican traditions alive for them because Christmas is very different in the United States," said Rojas, a Mexican immigrant who has lived in this country for four years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After seeking to provide hundreds of Orange County Latinos the skills to become community leaders, a popular advocacy group closed its local office this week. Although the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, known as MALDEF, was urged by Latino leaders to stay, organization officials said the five-year program is over.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After seeking to provide hundreds of Orange County Latinos the skills to become community leaders, a popular advocacy group closed its local office this week. Although the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, known as MALDEF, was urged by Latino leaders to stay, organization officials said the five-year program is over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fernando Rojas, 31, sat huddled with his two daughters at a table inside a hall here Thursday and explained to them the meaning of Las Posadas, a holiday tradition of Mexican Catholics that symbolizes Joseph and Mary's journey to Bethlehem. "I think it's important to keep the Mexican traditions alive for them because Christmas is very different in the United States," said Rojas, a Mexican immigrant who has lived in this country for four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Latino Health Access will throw a Mexican holiday tamale party that will highlight healthful ways to prepare the traditional food. The nonprofit organization, which promotes diabetes awareness among Latinos in Orange County, will hold its tamalada from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday at the Lawn Bowling Club, 510 E. Memory Lane.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1990
The Times states (Jan. 31) there are 440,000 Latinos in Orange County. It would be interesting to know how a survey of 400 residents and 120 Latino leaders, which took two years to complete and consisted of phone calls and a mailing, could possibly be used as a resource by 200 public and private policy-setting county agencies! In addition, the article is not clear as to how many of the 440,000 are legals and how many are illegals; certainly, all should be considered. LORRAINE FOSTER Westminster
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1991
The letter of Jaime B. Vega ("Taking Advantage of Latino Doctors," Dec. 23) demands an answer, lest it contribute to further misunderstanding and mistrust on the part of the Latinos of Orange County. Mr. Vega is quite ignorant of the law. In the state of California (and all other states as far as I know), all graduates of non-U.S. medical schools must pass an examination before they can practice here. This is true whether they come from Mexico, Canada, Denmark or Ghana and has nothing to do with the "mentality of Orange County" or "racial prejudice."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2001
The air of mystique surrounding the Cuban culture seems to have extended to the promotion of the art show. Weeks before the opening, hundreds of English and Spanish-language fliers distributed throughout Santa Ana announcing "Tiempo," have almost entirely disappeared, even from the Santora Building's display cases. Maybe it's because the fliers, produced by Stone, bear an image of Latin American revolutionary leader Ernesto "Che" Guevara, who fought to establish a Communist government in Cuba.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latinos in Orange County are more likely than any other ethnic group to be without health insurance and therefore have less access to medical care, according to a UC Irvine study. "These findings are disturbing not only because of the potential effects on the health of this population, but also because Latinos are the fastest-growing minority in the United States," the researchers concluded in an article published in the California Medical Assn.'s Western Journal of Medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1986 | Bob Schwartz
A coalition of community groups will hold a march Saturday to protest activity by immigration authorities in the county, a spokesman for the groups said. "We are calling for this protest march to draw attention to the INS raids occurring on the eve of legalization," said Frank Castillo, a spokesman for the Catholic Community United for Justice, a coalition of Latino and religious groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
A Superior Court judge on Monday rejected efforts by landlords to halt a prolonged rent strike by Latinos throughout Orange County but did move toward requiring the tenants group to give a detailed accounting of the rent collections it has been withholding. Over the last 3 years, Latino residents in several hundred housing units in Santa Ana, Garden Grove, Costa Mesa and elsewhere have withheld their rent payments as part of a campaign to pressure landlords to make repairs.
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