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Laton Mccartney

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February 10, 2008 | Tom Lutz, Tom Lutz, author of "Doing Nothing: A History of Loafers, Loungers, Slackers, and Bums in America," directs the master's program in writing at UC Riverside's Palm Desert Graduate Center.
Corruption abounds. The U.S. secretary of the Interior is giving no-bid contracts for oil, coal and timber on public land to the president's corporate campaign contributors in secret meetings. Big Oil not only writes energy policy but also dictates military options and environmental priorities, this last mainly by dismantling protections enacted by previous presidents. The U.S. attorney general signs off on whatever comes his way, putting the administration's friends above the law.
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February 10, 2008 | Tom Lutz, Tom Lutz, author of "Doing Nothing: A History of Loafers, Loungers, Slackers, and Bums in America," directs the master's program in writing at UC Riverside's Palm Desert Graduate Center.
Corruption abounds. The U.S. secretary of the Interior is giving no-bid contracts for oil, coal and timber on public land to the president's corporate campaign contributors in secret meetings. Big Oil not only writes energy policy but also dictates military options and environmental priorities, this last mainly by dismantling protections enacted by previous presidents. The U.S. attorney general signs off on whatever comes his way, putting the administration's friends above the law.
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BUSINESS
April 8, 1990
I found Michael Schrage's article ("Applying Zaibatsu Principles in the U.S.," March 8) fascinating. I had just read a history of Bechtel Co. ("Friends in High Places" by Laton McCartney) that commented that the Bechtels and other companies associated with the six companies in the Boulder Dam project made up a California zaibatsu. They clearly fit Schrage's description of the "developmental conglomerate," associating more informally than formally, pooling resources and jointly pursuing projects of a scope that none could do alone.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1990
I found Michael Schrage's article ("Applying Zaibatsu Principles in the U.S.," March 8) fascinating. I had just read a history of Bechtel Co. ("Friends in High Places" by Laton McCartney) that commented that the Bechtels and other companies associated with the six companies in the Boulder Dam project made up a California zaibatsu. They clearly fit Schrage's description of the "developmental conglomerate," associating more informally than formally, pooling resources and jointly pursuing projects of a scope that none could do alone.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
FRIENDS IN HIGH PLACES The Bechtel Story: The Most Secret Corporation and How It Engineered the World by Laton McCartney (Ballantine Books: $8.95) The Bechtel Group, a San Francisco-based engineering and construction firm, can be credited with building major pipelines for Standard Oil and Continental Gas in the 1920s, the Hoover Dam in Boulder, Colo., in the 1930s and possibly half the nuclear power plants in the world. In "Friends in High Places," a remarkable work of investigative reporting, Laton McCartney lays bare the inner machinations that made Bechtel such a paradigm of power: its politic interactions with the White House and the CIA. The group's close relations with the White House have been in the limelight under the previous administrations, particularly in the figures of George Shultz (Bechtel's president since 1975)
BOOKS
May 8, 1988 | Walter Russell Mead, Mead is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin)
From San Francisco to Saudi Arabia, the Bechtel Group Inc. has left its mark around the world. Yet the privately owned Bechtel Group is one of the country's most mysterious operations--or was, until the publication of Laton McCartney's critical and controversial "Friends in High Places." Those who believe that "Dynasty" and "Falcon Crest" describe life at the top of America's corporate pyramids will find a picture here that makes the most far-fetched TV plots look dull.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | David Streitfeld and Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writers
The entrance to Bechtel Group Inc. headquarters here is defended by metal crowd barriers and protected by security guards. Even the adjoining plaza, an oasis for harried office workers in benign times, is off-limits. Bechtel, the largest construction firm in the country and the best known, became a flashpoint for protesters in the first days of the Iraq war. Demonstrators accused privately held Bechtel, which was bidding to rebuild post-conflict Iraq, of war profiteering and worse.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | ELENA BRUNET
FRIENDS IN HIGH PLACES The Bechtel Story: The Most Secret Corporation and How It Engineered the World by Laton McCartney (Ballantine Books: $8.95) The Bechtel Group, a San Francisco-based engineering and construction firm, can be credited with building major pipelines for Standard Oil and Continental Gas in the 1920s, the Hoover Dam in Boulder, Colo., in the 1930s and possibly half the nuclear power plants in the world. In "Friends in High Places," a remarkable work of investigative reporting, Laton McCartney lays bare the inner machinations that made Bechtel such a paradigm of power: its politic interactions with the White House and the CIA. The group's close relations with the White House have been in the limelight under the previous administrations, particularly in the figures of George Shultz (Bechtel's president since 1975)
BOOKS
May 8, 1988 | Walter Russell Mead, Mead is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin)
From San Francisco to Saudi Arabia, the Bechtel Group Inc. has left its mark around the world. Yet the privately owned Bechtel Group is one of the country's most mysterious operations--or was, until the publication of Laton McCartney's critical and controversial "Friends in High Places." Those who believe that "Dynasty" and "Falcon Crest" describe life at the top of America's corporate pyramids will find a picture here that makes the most far-fetched TV plots look dull.
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