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NEWS
February 7, 1992 | Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle on Thursday pledged American support for the three Baltic states and announced $18 million in additional U.S. aid to them. Quayle, arriving from Finland, expressed America's support for Estonia which, with Latvia and Lithuania, regained independence from the Soviet Union in September.
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NEWS
December 7, 1996 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The joke at NATO's, a smoky bar on a cobbled street in this picturesque Baltic capital, is that this drinking hole with its mock missiles and land mines is as close as Lithuania will ever get to membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. But NATO jokes are starting to wear thin in the three tiny Baltic republics on Russia's militarily important northern European border.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993
I trust your headline writer for Saturday's (Jan. 30) letters section has been told to write "The Baltics are not the Balkans" 1,000 times on a blackboard to be kept nearby. While the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are struggling to convert to a market economy as Russia drags its heels in withdrawing the remainder of its occupation forces, the Balts are moving forward peacefully without the ethnic violence, which has so unfortunately consumed the Balkan region, some 1,000 miles to the south.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1995
The small Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania) will never feel safe alongside the arrogant giant Russia, until these countries become part of NATO. The article, "Russian Warnings Worry Neighbors" (April 21), clearly demonstrates the seriousness of the situation. When Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev states "use of armed forces should not be ruled out," an invasion by Russia is not only possible but quite probable. The Baltic countries need the backbone of NATO to discourage any adventurism by Russia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1995
The small Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania) will never feel safe alongside the arrogant giant Russia, until these countries become part of NATO. The article, "Russian Warnings Worry Neighbors" (April 21), clearly demonstrates the seriousness of the situation. When Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev states "use of armed forces should not be ruled out," an invasion by Russia is not only possible but quite probable. The Baltic countries need the backbone of NATO to discourage any adventurism by Russia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1988
I have read your news report "Soviets Concede Stalin's Actions Were Unjust: Monument to Ousted Latvians Pledged," by Michael Parks (Part I, June 15). First, I thank you for an excellent map, indicating all of the three Baltic states--Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. The news report stated that "On Tuesday (June 14), President Reagan signed a proclamation commemorating 'Baltic Freedom Day', saying that the United States will never recognize the incorporation of the three states into the Soviet Union."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1987
An article in the Aug. 25 Valley edition, entitled "Police Explode Facsimile Bomb in Canoga Park," refers to the "consulate of the small Soviet state of Estonia." This designation is grossly erroneous. The Soviet Union forcibly and illegally occupied the independent Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania during World War II. The United States, Canada, Great Britain, Belgium, Switzerland, Costa Rica and most other countries have refused to recognize the Soviet annexations of the Baltic States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1989
The spate of articles on the Baltic illustrates one more ghost of the Soviet Union's past that begs excoriation. For 50 years the existence of secret protocols were denied. Now they are finally acknowledged, but the necessary conclusions apparently are still too painful for the Soviet Union to admit. The fact is that the Baltic countries of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania never joined the Soviet Union voluntarily. If Gorbachev is sincere about glasnost, he should admit the wrongs of his predecessors and let these people go. When the Balts by the millions are signing petitions demanding independence, when their respective legislatures are passing resolutions declaring their sovereignty, and when millions of people join hands in a human chain from Talinn to Vilnius to demonstrate their solidarity, I think this is a historic opportunity to come through as a truly great leader by admitting that the Balts were wrongfully absorbed.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | MATTI HUUHTANEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Road builders are connecting Arctic Finland and Central Europe with a highway that eventually may stretch 2,500 miles from Murmansk to Turkey. Finnish companies will repair, and occasionally widen, the existing road through Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. They will construct access ramps, install signs and build Western-style gas stations along the 625-mile route.
SPORTS
August 28, 1991 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch said Wednesday that the apparent disintegration of the Soviet Union could have an almost immediate impact on international sports, speculating that the three Baltic republics--Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania--will participate as independent nations in the 1992 Summer Olympics at Barcelona, Spain.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher, seeking to calm an explosive issue that has fanned extremist nationalism in Russia, called on the governments of the three Baltic republics Wednesday to give better treatment to their embattled ethnic Russian minorities. "We urge the Latvian government and the other governments to act generously on this issue," Christopher said after meeting with the foreign ministers of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania. "We want to pursue this issue very vigorously."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993
I trust your headline writer for Saturday's (Jan. 30) letters section has been told to write "The Baltics are not the Balkans" 1,000 times on a blackboard to be kept nearby. While the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are struggling to convert to a market economy as Russia drags its heels in withdrawing the remainder of its occupation forces, the Balts are moving forward peacefully without the ethnic violence, which has so unfortunately consumed the Balkan region, some 1,000 miles to the south.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | Reuters
Vice President Dan Quayle on Thursday pledged American support for the three Baltic states and announced $18 million in additional U.S. aid to them. Quayle, arriving from Finland, expressed America's support for Estonia which, with Latvia and Lithuania, regained independence from the Soviet Union in September.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | MATTI HUUHTANEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Road builders are connecting Arctic Finland and Central Europe with a highway that eventually may stretch 2,500 miles from Murmansk to Turkey. Finnish companies will repair, and occasionally widen, the existing road through Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. They will construct access ramps, install signs and build Western-style gas stations along the 625-mile route.
SPORTS
August 28, 1991 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch said Wednesday that the apparent disintegration of the Soviet Union could have an almost immediate impact on international sports, speculating that the three Baltic republics--Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania--will participate as independent nations in the 1992 Summer Olympics at Barcelona, Spain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1989
The spate of articles on the Baltic illustrates one more ghost of the Soviet Union's past that begs excoriation. For 50 years the existence of secret protocols were denied. Now they are finally acknowledged, but the necessary conclusions apparently are still too painful for the Soviet Union to admit. The fact is that the Baltic countries of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania never joined the Soviet Union voluntarily. If Gorbachev is sincere about glasnost, he should admit the wrongs of his predecessors and let these people go. When the Balts by the millions are signing petitions demanding independence, when their respective legislatures are passing resolutions declaring their sovereignty, and when millions of people join hands in a human chain from Talinn to Vilnius to demonstrate their solidarity, I think this is a historic opportunity to come through as a truly great leader by admitting that the Balts were wrongfully absorbed.
NEWS
December 7, 1996 | MICHAEL TARM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The joke at NATO's, a smoky bar on a cobbled street in this picturesque Baltic capital, is that this drinking hole with its mock missiles and land mines is as close as Lithuania will ever get to membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. But NATO jokes are starting to wear thin in the three tiny Baltic republics on Russia's militarily important northern European border.
NEWS
October 28, 1993 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher, seeking to calm an explosive issue that has fanned extremist nationalism in Russia, called on the governments of the three Baltic republics Wednesday to give better treatment to their embattled ethnic Russian minorities. "We urge the Latvian government and the other governments to act generously on this issue," Christopher said after meeting with the foreign ministers of Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania. "We want to pursue this issue very vigorously."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1988
I have read your news report "Soviets Concede Stalin's Actions Were Unjust: Monument to Ousted Latvians Pledged," by Michael Parks (Part I, June 15). First, I thank you for an excellent map, indicating all of the three Baltic states--Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. The news report stated that "On Tuesday (June 14), President Reagan signed a proclamation commemorating 'Baltic Freedom Day', saying that the United States will never recognize the incorporation of the three states into the Soviet Union."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1987
An article in the Aug. 25 Valley edition, entitled "Police Explode Facsimile Bomb in Canoga Park," refers to the "consulate of the small Soviet state of Estonia." This designation is grossly erroneous. The Soviet Union forcibly and illegally occupied the independent Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania during World War II. The United States, Canada, Great Britain, Belgium, Switzerland, Costa Rica and most other countries have refused to recognize the Soviet annexations of the Baltic States.
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