Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLatvia Foreign Relations Ussr
IN THE NEWS

Latvia Foreign Relations Ussr

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
September 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The newly independent Baltic republics of Latvia and Estonia on Friday rejected an invitation to join a Soviet team for next year's Olympics, a Soviet wire service reported. Ulyana Semyonova, vice president of Latvia's Olympic Committee, said the republic would "by no means" accept an appeal from Soviet sports officials to form a united team for the Albertville and Barcelona Games. "We have become a separate state and we have nothing to do with the U.S.S.R.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 26, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alwils Barowskis is racing against time. Very shortly, he expects the Latvian government to shut down most existing free trade between Latvia and its former parent, the Soviet Union. That means the imposition of duties and import licensing rules. And that, in turn, could dry up the flow of Soviet steel and aluminum that Barowskis has been frantically buying.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was their country's first free day in half a century, and the 11th- and 12th-grade Estonian history classes at Tallinn Secondary School No. 1 took a break from their planned lessons Friday to discuss their tiny Baltic country's independence from the Soviet Union. "We were so determined that our little nation would not be destroyed by the Russians that we became like one person," said Heiti Valguee, a bright-eyed 11th-grader. "We held on to each other.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | From a Times Staff Writer
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev on Wednesday announced the formation of a nine-man consultative team that includes many of his early advisers on restructuring the Soviet government, including former Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze. The Tass news agency said that three members of the council will lead the Soviet Union's coming negotiations over economic and other ties with the three Baltic states, which won their independence this month.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Lithuania said Friday that it is stepping up efforts to break a Kremlin oil blockade, preparing its port to receive foreign tankers and for the first time exploiting its own oil reserves. Oil Minister Leonas Asmantas said talks were under way with oil suppliers in Saudi Arabia, Denmark and North America, and that the republic's port at Klaipeda would be ready to take deliveries starting next week.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big smiles lit up Estonian faces Monday evening as the news spread that the United States had recognized their tiny republic's independence, but any dancing in the streets, they said, will be reserved for the day that the Soviet Union acknowledges its sovereignty. "There is a very joyful mood in Estonia because we are closer than ever to becoming independent," said Tiina-Mari Nummert, an 18-year-old art student who was sketching a street scene in Tallinn's old town when she heard the news.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Lithuanian government, retreating from its three-month-old declaration of independence, recommended on Saturday that the Baltic republic's Parliament suspend the declaration in order to begin negotiations with the central government on Lithuania's secession from the Soviet Union. The Lithuanian Cabinet proposed that the Supreme Council, the republic's Parliament, declare a "temporary moratorium" on the independence act to meet Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Wednesday hailed meetings between Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and leaders of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia as "good news" and a potential "first step" toward resolving the four-month conflict over independence for the Baltic republics. "I hope that what we saw yesterday is a first step in a dialogue that will lead to the self-determination that we strongly support," Bush said in a Washington press conference with representatives of regional newspapers.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | Reuters
The Parliament of Soviet Latvia voted Thursday to work for Latvian independence in the latest separatist challenge to the Kremlin from the restive Baltic republics. After heated debate, the Latvian Supreme Soviet adopted by 177 votes to 48 a declaration that said: "It is necessary to do all to restore the state independence of Latvia and transform it into a free, independent Latvian state."
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radicals stormed out of the congress of the Latvian Communist Party on Saturday after the majority of delegates refused to seek the Baltic republic's independence from the Soviet Union. Nearly one-third of the 792 delegates, virtually all Latvian nationalists, broke away from the party congress when the majority voted down a draft platform that would have established an autonomous Latvian Communist Party as a step toward independence for the republic itself.
SPORTS
September 14, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The newly independent Baltic republics of Latvia and Estonia on Friday rejected an invitation to join a Soviet team for next year's Olympics, a Soviet wire service reported. Ulyana Semyonova, vice president of Latvia's Olympic Committee, said the republic would "by no means" accept an appeal from Soviet sports officials to form a united team for the Albertville and Barcelona Games. "We have become a separate state and we have nothing to do with the U.S.S.R.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The History Official recognition of independence for the three Baltic states ends a struggle by Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia since their annexation by the Soviet Union on the eve of World War II. But their history involves centuries of both Germanic and Russian domination. * Independence for the three provinces of imperial Russia came with the Treaty of Versailles after World War I.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Half a century after carving up the heart of Europe in secret with Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union gave up the choicest of its spoils Friday by recognizing the independence of the three unbowed Baltic states: Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The decision, at the inaugural meeting of the day-old State Council, had been promised by Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev. It was the first concrete episode in the breakup of the Soviet state that he is struggling mightily to prevent.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union may have finally acknowledged the independence of the Baltic states, but to political leaders here and in Latvia and Lithuania this chiefly means they now can begin in earnest the negotiations over the withdrawal of the Soviet military presence that has dominated their lands for 50 years. "We understand this is going to be a process, not a one-time act, and it will take some time," Andris Gutmanis, the Latvian deputy minister of economics, said Friday.
NEWS
September 7, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was their country's first free day in half a century, and the 11th- and 12th-grade Estonian history classes at Tallinn Secondary School No. 1 took a break from their planned lessons Friday to discuss their tiny Baltic country's independence from the Soviet Union. "We were so determined that our little nation would not be destroyed by the Russians that we became like one person," said Heiti Valguee, a bright-eyed 11th-grader. "We held on to each other.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bankers, business people and economists in the three Baltic republics were caught off guard when the collapse of last month's Kremlin putsch sent their countries surging toward independence. "Who could have predicted that it would happen so quickly?" Elmar Matt, director of the Bank of Estonia, the republic's central bank, said in an interview Wednesday. "Our prognosis was that we would be completely free by 1995."
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Kremlin is resisting a proposal by the three Baltic republics for joint negotiations on their independence demands, according to Vita Barshis, a spokesman for Lithuanian Prime Minister Kazimiera Prunskiene. But Barshis said Lithuania is pushing ahead with the idea and has invited the Estonian and Latvian prime ministers to Vilnius this weekend for a strategy session.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Baltic republics of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania declared Saturday that they will not participate in the negotiations to transform the Soviet Union into a federal state with broad autonomy for its members. The three Baltic presidents, meeting in the Latvian beach resort of Jurmala, said their republics instead will proceed with talks on their own independence from the Soviet Union and on their future relations with Russia and the other republics that remain in the federal union.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is ready to sign a decree at the end of this week that will recognize the independence of the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, the Kremlin told Baltic officials Wednesday. The presidential decree, as provided to Baltic officials, would declare invalid the Soviet Union's annexation of the three states in 1940 under a pact with Nazi Germany; its legal effect would be to restore their independence.
NEWS
September 3, 1991 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Monday--before the champagne, before the polka bands, before the folk dancing and speeches and toasts--Danute Mazeika went to a cemetery in East Los Angeles with an armful of chrysanthemums and two long-awaited words. "You won," the Lithuanian-American activist said silently to her grandfather's grave.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|