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Latvia Revolts

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NEWS
October 2, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would not be far-fetched to say the movement for the independence of Lithuania began 70 miles from here, at the largest nuclear construction site in the world. The Soviet-built power station at Ignalina already boasted twin reactors modeled after those at Chernobyl when Lithuanian environmentalists organized public demonstrations in 1986 to force Moscow to cancel an additional, larger reactor already under construction. They were more successful than they could have dreamed.
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NEWS
October 2, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would not be far-fetched to say the movement for the independence of Lithuania began 70 miles from here, at the largest nuclear construction site in the world. The Soviet-built power station at Ignalina already boasted twin reactors modeled after those at Chernobyl when Lithuanian environmentalists organized public demonstrations in 1986 to force Moscow to cancel an additional, larger reactor already under construction. They were more successful than they could have dreamed.
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NEWS
August 22, 1991
Moscow: Cheering and waving flags, crowds celebrated the end of the coup outside the Russian Parliament. Departing soldiers rode atop tanks strewn with flowers. Lithuania: Soviet Interior Ministry troops attempted to break through a barricade near the republic's Parliament building in Vilnius and exchanged gunfire with Lithuanian security guards. At least one security guard and one Soviet soldier were reported wounded.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
Moscow: Cheering and waving flags, crowds celebrated the end of the coup outside the Russian Parliament. Departing soldiers rode atop tanks strewn with flowers. Lithuania: Soviet Interior Ministry troops attempted to break through a barricade near the republic's Parliament building in Vilnius and exchanged gunfire with Lithuanian security guards. At least one security guard and one Soviet soldier were reported wounded.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Baltic republic of Latvia followed neighboring Estonia on Wednesday in declaring itself independent in the wake of the abortive coup in Moscow. Latvian Radio said President Anatolijs Gorbunovs signed a decree at the Parliament in Riga. "The political situation is such that we had to do it now," Aldis Bezins, the Latvian representative in Estonia, said, adding that he hopes that other countries will now recognize Latvia.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Tens of thousands of Latvians marched through gray, wet streets Saturday behind the body of a man who officials of the independence-minded republic say was killed by Soviet soldiers. Meanwhile, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported that a pro-Moscow group, the Latvian National Salvation Committee, claimed that it was dismissing the nationalist government and taking power. But Latvia's president said the report was false.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Parliament of the breakaway Baltic republic of Estonia declared immediate full independence from the Soviet Union on Tuesday and said parliamentary elections would be held next year on the basis of a new constitution. There were no reports of confrontations in the republic despite apparently large Soviet military movements in the capital of Tallinn.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of them had patrolled together for years as Latvia's "boys in blue," but two weeks ago they fired Kalashnikov automatic rifles at one another in a fierce 90-minute gun battle in central Riga. Troops from the "black berets" sprayed the headquarters of the Latvian Interior Ministry and surrounding areas with rounds of automatic weapon fire, took over the building and shot dead two policemen.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet commandos shot their way into the headquarters of the Latvian Interior Ministry on Sunday night, seizing the building in a gun battle that raged in central Riga, the Latvian capital, for 90 minutes. Four people were killed and at least nine wounded, according to initial reports.
NEWS
August 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Baltic republic of Latvia followed neighboring Estonia on Wednesday in declaring itself independent in the wake of the abortive coup in Moscow. Latvian Radio said President Anatolijs Gorbunovs signed a decree at the Parliament in Riga. "The political situation is such that we had to do it now," Aldis Bezins, the Latvian representative in Estonia, said, adding that he hopes that other countries will now recognize Latvia.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Parliament of the breakaway Baltic republic of Estonia declared immediate full independence from the Soviet Union on Tuesday and said parliamentary elections would be held next year on the basis of a new constitution. There were no reports of confrontations in the republic despite apparently large Soviet military movements in the capital of Tallinn.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many of them had patrolled together for years as Latvia's "boys in blue," but two weeks ago they fired Kalashnikov automatic rifles at one another in a fierce 90-minute gun battle in central Riga. Troops from the "black berets" sprayed the headquarters of the Latvian Interior Ministry and surrounding areas with rounds of automatic weapon fire, took over the building and shot dead two policemen.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet commandos shot their way into the headquarters of the Latvian Interior Ministry on Sunday night, seizing the building in a gun battle that raged in central Riga, the Latvian capital, for 90 minutes. Four people were killed and at least nine wounded, according to initial reports.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | From Associated Press
Tens of thousands of Latvians marched through gray, wet streets Saturday behind the body of a man who officials of the independence-minded republic say was killed by Soviet soldiers. Meanwhile, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported that a pro-Moscow group, the Latvian National Salvation Committee, claimed that it was dismissing the nationalist government and taking power. But Latvia's president said the report was false.
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