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Laugh Factory Nightclub

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spending Thanksgiving broke or alone is no joke. Jamie Masada, a comedian turned nightclub impresario, remembers how it was. "I was worse than hungry," Masada said. "I had no family, nowhere to go. And I swore that if I made it, I would give some back."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 31, 2007
Make 'em laugh: Jamie Masada, owner of the Laugh Factory in Hollywood, says he has signed comedian Jon Lovitz to a lifetime contract to perform Wednesdays at 8 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1995 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The line forms early at the Laugh Factory on Tuesday nights--two, four, sometimes 10 or 12 hours before show time. The lure is not a typical night of professional stand-up at the club or even a special appearance by some comedy superstar. Tuesday is Open Mike Night, and the jittery, high-spirited crowd that collects outside is there in hopes of scoring a bit of precious time on stage. For novice comics hoping to launch a career in comedy, Los Angeles is the place to be seen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1999 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angelenos who ventured to the Laugh Factory on Thursday got more than a laugh. In addition to healthy helpings of humor, they were treated to ample portions of hospitality and a Thanksgiving meal with all the fixings. For nearly 20 years, the comedy club's owner, Jamie Masada has invited the homeless, plus comedians and actors awaiting their big break, to celebrate turkey day with him. Thursday, a smiling Masada once again stood in front of the main door and welcomed visitors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1999 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angelenos who ventured to the Laugh Factory on Thursday got more than a laugh. In addition to healthy helpings of humor, they were treated to ample portions of hospitality and a Thanksgiving meal with all the fixings. For nearly 20 years, the comedy club's owner, Jamie Masada has invited the homeless, plus comedians and actors awaiting their big break, to celebrate turkey day with him. Thursday, a smiling Masada once again stood in front of the main door and welcomed visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A recent Thursday night audience at the Laugh Factory in Hollywood was about to get a special treat. Rodney Dangerfield had arrived at the club, and the legendary comedian, showing his age, was shuffling to the stage for an impromptu set. The surprised crowd cheered wildly, but upstairs, in a lounge that doubles as a kind of peanut gallery, Dangerfield's appearance was hardly good news.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI
"I don't ever like to talk about what I've done for successful comedians," says Laugh Factory proprietor Jamie Masada. "I can only talk about what they've done for me. Comedians have made me what I am, and without them I'd be nobody." Masada plunged into the Hollywood comedy scene in 1974, a 14-year-old Israeli emigre traveling without family, without much money, and with oversized dreams of stand-up stardom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The comedians stand in line, hot and sweaty and wait-weary under a noon-hour sun, asking what is, at least for the moment, a very unfunny question: "Where the hell is Scruncho?" Heads turn. "He's back in that old Pontiac, asleep," somebody offers. "No, he ain't. I looked." "Hey, isn't he the guy who opened for Julio Iglesias?" "That's real nice. But I ain't seen Scruncho in, like, five hours. If he's not back in five minutes, he's a goner."
NEWS
May 31, 2007
Make 'em laugh: Jamie Masada, owner of the Laugh Factory in Hollywood, says he has signed comedian Jon Lovitz to a lifetime contract to perform Wednesdays at 8 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
"The recession's come to Washington. Two senators just got laid off. We're running the country with 98 senators instead of 100." Jamie Masada confesses that he stole the joke from Jay Leno, who still drops in to perform at Masada's Laugh Factory from time to time, despite Leno's "Tonight Show" success. Masada survived the recession of 1981-82 by maintaining such loyalties and alliances and he expects to survive the recession of 1991 the same way.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A recent Thursday night audience at the Laugh Factory in Hollywood was about to get a special treat. Rodney Dangerfield had arrived at the club, and the legendary comedian, showing his age, was shuffling to the stage for an impromptu set. The surprised crowd cheered wildly, but upstairs, in a lounge that doubles as a kind of peanut gallery, Dangerfield's appearance was hardly good news.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The comedians stand in line, hot and sweaty and wait-weary under a noon-hour sun, asking what is, at least for the moment, a very unfunny question: "Where the hell is Scruncho?" Heads turn. "He's back in that old Pontiac, asleep," somebody offers. "No, he ain't. I looked." "Hey, isn't he the guy who opened for Julio Iglesias?" "That's real nice. But I ain't seen Scruncho in, like, five hours. If he's not back in five minutes, he's a goner."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1995 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The line forms early at the Laugh Factory on Tuesday nights--two, four, sometimes 10 or 12 hours before show time. The lure is not a typical night of professional stand-up at the club or even a special appearance by some comedy superstar. Tuesday is Open Mike Night, and the jittery, high-spirited crowd that collects outside is there in hopes of scoring a bit of precious time on stage. For novice comics hoping to launch a career in comedy, Los Angeles is the place to be seen.
NEWS
November 9, 1995 | DUANE NORIYUKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a serious tone to this gathering of clowns, who, in discussing their art, traverse into areas of science and history, laughter and tears. Comedian Byron Allen sits showered by lights on the Laugh Factory stage. Life is not always so bright, he tells youngsters in the Laugh Factory Comedy Camp. And in moments of darkness, he says, they must learn to persist. As a child, Allen's mother took him along to NBC, where she worked as a tour guide.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI
"I don't ever like to talk about what I've done for successful comedians," says Laugh Factory proprietor Jamie Masada. "I can only talk about what they've done for me. Comedians have made me what I am, and without them I'd be nobody." Masada plunged into the Hollywood comedy scene in 1974, a 14-year-old Israeli emigre traveling without family, without much money, and with oversized dreams of stand-up stardom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spending Thanksgiving broke or alone is no joke. Jamie Masada, a comedian turned nightclub impresario, remembers how it was. "I was worse than hungry," Masada said. "I had no family, nowhere to go. And I swore that if I made it, I would give some back."
NEWS
November 9, 1995 | DUANE NORIYUKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a serious tone to this gathering of clowns, who, in discussing their art, traverse into areas of science and history, laughter and tears. Comedian Byron Allen sits showered by lights on the Laugh Factory stage. Life is not always so bright, he tells youngsters in the Laugh Factory Comedy Camp. And in moments of darkness, he says, they must learn to persist. As a child, Allen's mother took him along to NBC, where she worked as a tour guide.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
"The recession's come to Washington. Two senators just got laid off. We're running the country with 98 senators instead of 100." Jamie Masada confesses that he stole the joke from Jay Leno, who still drops in to perform at Masada's Laugh Factory from time to time, despite Leno's "Tonight Show" success. Masada survived the recession of 1981-82 by maintaining such loyalties and alliances and he expects to survive the recession of 1991 the same way.
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