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Laura Baugh

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March 3, 1986 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Laura Baugh had promised champagne for the press if she won the Uniden LPGA Invitational. Sunday night the champagne was back in the case, but the tears flowed like wine. Baugh's first pro golf victory seemed so near she could taste it when she entered Sunday's final round with a four-stroke lead at Mesa Verde Country Club in Costa Mesa. When it was over she had come just close enough to break her heart.
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SPORTS
September 16, 2006 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
When Kimberly Kim stepped to the final tee at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club's Witch Hollow course in Oregon last month, Laura Baugh was home in Orlando, Fla., watching intently on TV. Was Baugh cheering Kim on or cringing at each shot? "A little of both, actually," said Baugh, who 35 years ago became the youngest golfer to win the U.S. Women's Amateur tournament. But when Kim sank a five-foot birdie putt to clinch the same title, Baugh's record was history.
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SPORTS
August 9, 1991 | Associated Press
Laura Baugh, seeking her first victory in 17 years on the LPGA tour before she leaves to have her fourth child, tied for the first-round lead Thursday in a $450,000 LPGA tournament at Stratton Mountain, Va. Baugh and last week's winner, Deb Richard, matched strokes in the same threesome for four-under-par 68s, and Rosie Jones came in moments later with the same score.
SPORTS
August 7, 1999
One man's opinion: Anna Kournikova is the Laura Baugh of tennis. JOE LYOU Gardena
SPORTS
March 1, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
That pussycat of a course known earlier in the week as Mesa Verde Country Club grew fangs and claws during Friday's second round of the $330,000 Uniden LPGA Invitational golf tournament. The leader board, once cluttered with four co-leaders and another 16 players within three shots, became spacious and roomy. By day's end, Laura Baugh had the lead, and just seven other players were within three strokes.
SPORTS
September 16, 2006 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
When Kimberly Kim stepped to the final tee at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club's Witch Hollow course in Oregon last month, Laura Baugh was home in Orlando, Fla., watching intently on TV. Was Baugh cheering Kim on or cringing at each shot? "A little of both, actually," said Baugh, who 35 years ago became the youngest golfer to win the U.S. Women's Amateur tournament. But when Kim sank a five-foot birdie putt to clinch the same title, Baugh's record was history.
SPORTS
August 7, 1999
One man's opinion: Anna Kournikova is the Laura Baugh of tennis. JOE LYOU Gardena
SPORTS
March 14, 1986 | JIM MURRAY
It is well established that golf is far and away the most frustrating of games that people play. Life is not fair, but golf is ridiculous. Its role is anti-history all the way. It is the Dracula of sports. You can hear its mocking laughter echoing over the sand traps and water hazards long after the golfers have slammed their spiked shoes into the lockers and cursed the fate that made them take up the game in the first place.
SPORTS
July 19, 1985
Laura Baugh made a hole in one on the par-3 16th hole on her way to shooting a 67 on Thursday to grab a one-stroke lead after the first round of the $225,000 LPGA Boston Five tournament at Danvers, Mass. Baugh hit a 5-iron into the cup on the fly at the 158-yard hole at the Radisson Ferncroft Country Club. It was her fifth lifetime ace and second as a professional. "All of my holes in one have been good shots. This one flew into the hole without hitting anything," Baugh said.
SPORTS
March 3, 1986 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
The final round of the Uniden LPGA Invitational at Mesa Verde Country Club was devoid of one bastion of American sport. Booing. People just do not boo at golf tournaments. Spectators do not try to distract players putting by waving their arms the way they do to a basketball player shooting a free throw. They are horribly courteous to everyone.
SPORTS
August 9, 1991 | Associated Press
Laura Baugh, seeking her first victory in 17 years on the LPGA tour before she leaves to have her fourth child, tied for the first-round lead Thursday in a $450,000 LPGA tournament at Stratton Mountain, Va. Baugh and last week's winner, Deb Richard, matched strokes in the same threesome for four-under-par 68s, and Rosie Jones came in moments later with the same score.
SPORTS
March 14, 1986 | JIM MURRAY
It is well established that golf is far and away the most frustrating of games that people play. Life is not fair, but golf is ridiculous. Its role is anti-history all the way. It is the Dracula of sports. You can hear its mocking laughter echoing over the sand traps and water hazards long after the golfers have slammed their spiked shoes into the lockers and cursed the fate that made them take up the game in the first place.
SPORTS
March 3, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
One minute, Laura Baugh, the sentimental choice of locals and underdog fans alike, is two holes away from winning her first professional tournament, in this case, the Uniden LPGA Invitational at the Mesa Verde Country Club. The bubbly is on ice, the victory smile ready. The next moment there is Mary Beth Zimmerman, collecting birdies as if they were on sale at the golf shop. Meanwhile, Baugh is finding trouble at every turn.
SPORTS
March 3, 1986 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Laura Baugh had promised champagne for the press if she won the Uniden LPGA Invitational. Sunday night the champagne was back in the case, but the tears flowed like wine. Baugh's first pro golf victory seemed so near she could taste it when she entered Sunday's final round with a four-stroke lead at Mesa Verde Country Club in Costa Mesa. When it was over she had come just close enough to break her heart.
SPORTS
March 3, 1986 | STEVE LOWERY, Times Staff Writer
The final round of the Uniden LPGA Invitational at Mesa Verde Country Club was devoid of one bastion of American sport. Booing. People just do not boo at golf tournaments. Spectators do not try to distract players putting by waving their arms the way they do to a basketball player shooting a free throw. They are horribly courteous to everyone.
SPORTS
March 2, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
Just a thought, but after three rounds of the Uniden LPGA Invitational golf tournament, maybe Laura Baugh should consider the following: --Purchasing the champagne she promised for the press in case of victory. --Clearing a space in her trophy case for something that, for a change, says 'first place' on it. All right, perhaps it's too early for such talk. Or is it?
SPORTS
March 2, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
Just a thought, but after three rounds of the Uniden LPGA Invitational golf tournament, maybe Laura Baugh should consider the following: --Purchasing the champagne she promised for the press in case of victory. --Clearing a space in her trophy case for something that, for a change, says 'first place' on it. All right, perhaps it's too early for such talk. Or is it?
SPORTS
March 3, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
One minute, Laura Baugh, the sentimental choice of locals and underdog fans alike, is two holes away from winning her first professional tournament, in this case, the Uniden LPGA Invitational at the Mesa Verde Country Club. The bubbly is on ice, the victory smile ready. The next moment there is Mary Beth Zimmerman, collecting birdies as if they were on sale at the golf shop. Meanwhile, Baugh is finding trouble at every turn.
SPORTS
March 1, 1986 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, Times Staff Writer
That pussycat of a course known earlier in the week as Mesa Verde Country Club grew fangs and claws during Friday's second round of the $330,000 Uniden LPGA Invitational golf tournament. The leader board, once cluttered with four co-leaders and another 16 players within three shots, became spacious and roomy. By day's end, Laura Baugh had the lead, and just seven other players were within three strokes.
SPORTS
July 19, 1985
Laura Baugh made a hole in one on the par-3 16th hole on her way to shooting a 67 on Thursday to grab a one-stroke lead after the first round of the $225,000 LPGA Boston Five tournament at Danvers, Mass. Baugh hit a 5-iron into the cup on the fly at the 158-yard hole at the Radisson Ferncroft Country Club. It was her fifth lifetime ace and second as a professional. "All of my holes in one have been good shots. This one flew into the hole without hitting anything," Baugh said.
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