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Laura Bush

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2010
BOOKS Laura Bush With her disarmingly placid exterior and beguiling cheerfulness, Laura Bush was a mystery of a first lady. Now she opens up (kind of) in "Spoken From the Heart," in which an account of an auto accident she caused that claimed the life of her friend punctuates an affecting portrait of a solitary, bookish only childhood in Midland, Texas; career as an educator and librarian; and her enduring, opposites-attract marriage to George W. Signing only. Vroman's Bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of April 21 -27, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES The Graham Norton Show Gwyneth Paltrow, Lee Mack and runner Mo Farah are guests, and Hurts performs. 7 and 10 p.m. BBC America The Big Bang Theory One of Sheldon's (Jim Parsons) favorite TV shows is canceled and Amy (Mayim Bialik) tries to help him cope, in this new episode.
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NATIONAL
September 8, 2009 | Associated Press
washington -- Former First Lady Laura Bush on Monday expressed support for President Obama's decision to speak to the nation's schoolchildren, saying it was "really important for everyone to respect the president of the United States." In an interview with CNN, Bush, a former schoolteacher, said: "There's a place for the president of the United States to . . . encourage schoolchildren" to stay in school. Parents and others, she said, need to send that message as well. Bush also praised Obama's performance, saying that "he's tackled a lot to start with, and that's made it difficult."
NATIONAL
April 24, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
DALLAS -- Former First Lady Laura Bush spoke Wednesday during a preview tour of the new George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum at her alma mater, Southern Methodist University in Dallas. President Obama is expected to join the Bushes, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter for the library's dedication Thursday. Laura Bush, who was involved in the library's design of Texas limestone and pecan, said she hopes visitors are touched by the 9/11 display, which includes a twisted steel beam from Tower 2 of the World Trade Center.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2002 | From Associated Press
Laura Bush, a librarian by profession, is spending a rare weekend as a campaigner, politicking for Republicans in a four-state swing from New Hampshire to South Dakota. The venture by the first lady, who normally avoids campaigning, is a sign of how seriously her husband's administration is taking Tuesday's midterm elections.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Recalling her difficulties decades ago as a new teacher, First Lady Laura Bush said colleges still are not always preparing new teachers for the classroom. "People leave college with their teacher certificate in hand and they go into a classroom and come to find out they've never really learned how to teach somebody to read," she said before opening a two-day White House conference on early childhood education.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2005
How nice to know that Laura Bush is hoping to turn her performance of scripted jokes at the Washington correspondents' dinner into a legacy ["Bright Star Indeed," by Robin Abcarian, May 7]. A legacy of what? Bad taste? Call me old-fashioned, but I find it demeaning and vulgar for the first lady to make jokes about the vice president's wife and male strippers in any context. Worse yet, in the face of 1,600 soldiers dead in Iraq, along with tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians, a collapsing economy at home and 40 million Americans without health insurance, her quip about how Bushie and his cronies like to "tear things down" went beyond matters of taste.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
A woman wearing a T-shirt with the words "President Bush You Killed My Son" and a picture of a soldier killed in Iraq was detained Thursday after she interrupted a campaign speech by First Lady Laura Bush. Police escorted Sue Niederer, of Hopewell, N.J., from a rally at a firehouse after she demanded to know why her son, Army 1st Lt. Seth Dvorin, 24, was killed in Iraq. Dvorin died in February while trying to disarm a bomb.
NEWS
January 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
First Lady Laura Bush's inaugural gown became a historical artifact Sunday when she donated it to the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. Exactly one year after her husband took the oath of office, leading her to nine inaugural balls and into the White House, Bush turned the sequined red dress over to the museum. She kept up a tradition dating back to Helen Taft, whose husband, William Howard Taft, was sworn in as president in 1909, and who later donated her gown.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | RICHARD T. COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republicans opened their 37th quadrennial convention here Monday with new-found determination to shun the ideological rhetoric of the past and present a gentler, more welcoming face to the nation, with Texas First Lady Laura Bush and retired Gen. Colin L. Powell focusing on education, racial harmony and other issues that transcend traditional party lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In "The Jackie Look," the last of eight monologues that make up her new book "The Reality Shows" (Feminist Press: 256 pp., $17.95 paper), Karen Finley offers a statement that suggests her point of view. "Life," she writes, "is more important than art / But life is meaningless without art. " Finley may be speaking in the voice of Jackie Kennedy, but she is also referring to herself. In the generation since she, along with fellow performance artists John Fleck, Tim Miller and Holly Hughes, were stripped of federal grant funding as members of the NEA Four, Finley has found herself represented in ways she never imagined, turned into a mirror for those on both sides of the free expression divide.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The honorific "first lady of the United States" was first accorded to Dolly Madison, the erudite, charming and popular wife of our fourth president, though she earlier had acted as official White House hostess for his great friend, the widower Thomas Jefferson. Other first ladies since are recalled as embodying various permutations of their position, which is not an official office: Edith Wilson is remembered for her dubious overreaching during her husband's last, debilitating illness; Eleanor Roosevelt for her outspokenness and vigorous embrace of progressive causes; Nancy Reagan for her fierce loyalty and fashion; Laura Bush for her intelligence and dignity.
OPINION
May 23, 2010 | Craig Fehrman
In the spring of 1949, Eleanor Roosevelt turned in the manuscript for her second memoir — this one on the White House years — to her editors at Ladies' Home Journal. "You have written this too hastily," came the reply, "as though you were composing it on a bicycle while pedaling your way to a fire." Roosevelt's editors asked her to revise the manuscript with the help of a ghostwriter, but she refused. "I would have felt the book wasn't mine," she said. She ended up selling her book's serial rights to the Journal's biggest rival, McCall's, for $150,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2010
BOOKS Laura Bush With her disarmingly placid exterior and beguiling cheerfulness, Laura Bush was a mystery of a first lady. Now she opens up (kind of) in "Spoken From the Heart," in which an account of an auto accident she caused that claimed the life of her friend punctuates an affecting portrait of a solitary, bookish only childhood in Midland, Texas; career as an educator and librarian; and her enduring, opposites-attract marriage to George W. Signing only. Vroman's Bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2010
Spoken From the Heart Laura Bush Scribner: 456 pp., $30
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Today, the title "First Lady" comes so freighted with elaboration and expectation that it's easy to forget that it's a position without any official or statutory existence. Our notions of how a first lady is supposed to behave or of what her obligations may be are entirely creatures of custom and social convention that have emerged rather slowly over time. The only constant that extends back to the founding is the expectation that a particular woman will be designated to act as the president's hostess and organizer of the White House social affairs.
WORLD
September 30, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
First Lady Laura Bush ushered the United States back into the U.N.'s main cultural agency at its Paris headquarters. The U.S. rejoined the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization after an absence since 1984 from a group the Reagan administration said was corrupted by bad management, wasteful spending and anti-Western views. Mrs. Bush, who was on the second day of a five-day trip, started off at the Elysee Palace with a social call on President Jacques Chirac.
OPINION
December 18, 2001
Three cheers to Norah Vincent for her Dec. 13 commentary on Laura Bush, "A Graceful Ballast in the Battleship White House." Vincent accurately paints a picture of a quietly competent and gracious first lady, one who lends long-overdue dignity and decorum to the White House. But shame on Vincent for denigrating Hillary Rodham Clinton with unnecessary potshots and politicizing the commentary. Laura Bush is a class act and, as she has proven, can stand on her own two feet. William Gray Long Beach Spare us the overreaching prose of writers like Vincent.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
As a politician, George W. Bush was never afraid to be a lightning rod. His presidential library will be anything but. Plans released Wednesday for the $250-million, 225,000-square-foot George W. Bush Presidential Center, to be built at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, carry no hint of the swagger or bravado Bush was known for during two terms in the White House. Designed by New York's Robert A.M. Stern, this country's leading producer of well-tailored architectural nostalgia, the library promises instead to be a handsome, contextual building wrapped in Texas limestone -- which is not a euphemism, like "Texas Tea," but an honest-to-goodness building material -- and red brick.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2009 | Associated Press
washington -- Former First Lady Laura Bush on Monday expressed support for President Obama's decision to speak to the nation's schoolchildren, saying it was "really important for everyone to respect the president of the United States." In an interview with CNN, Bush, a former schoolteacher, said: "There's a place for the president of the United States to . . . encourage schoolchildren" to stay in school. Parents and others, she said, need to send that message as well. Bush also praised Obama's performance, saying that "he's tackled a lot to start with, and that's made it difficult."
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