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Laura Groppe

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BUSINESS
April 12, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before she turned 30, Laura Groppe co-produced an Academy Award-winning film and won four MTV awards. After that, she started a company that pioneered development of software for girls. Her next act: the Internet. Faced with a slump in CD-ROM sales that already claimed a competitor, Groppe is reinventing her software company as a "dot-com" aimed at teenage girls. In the last six months, Groppe has doubled the work force at Girl Games Inc. to 23, adding Web designers and writers.
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before she turned 30, Laura Groppe co-produced an Academy Award-winning film and won four MTV awards. After that, she started a company that pioneered development of software for girls. Her next act: the Internet. Faced with a slump in CD-ROM sales that already claimed a competitor, Groppe is reinventing her software company as a "dot-com" aimed at teenage girls. In the last six months, Groppe has doubled the work force at Girl Games Inc. to 23, adding Web designers and writers.
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BUSINESS
June 7, 1997
A new wave of software designers for girls, such as Laura Groppe's Girl Games, is on a mission to create multimedia products that speak the female language.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2003 | Hanah Cho, Times Staff Writer
Nolee, Chelsea and Madison are fashion mavens who wear navel-revealing tops, low-riders and platform shoes. This fall, your second-grader could look like them. The Mattel Inc. dolls are the inspiration for a back-to-school clothes collection aimed at girls ages 7 to 14 that will be sold at Too Inc.'s Limited Too stores. Like so many other firms with an eye on the $11-billion so-called 'tweens market, analysts say, Mattel and Too Inc.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1996 | LAURIE BECKLUND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For nearly a decade, Silicon Valley companies have tried with limited success to retool their computer games to appeal to a vast but seemingly inscrutable market: girls. Now comes Girl Games, a small Texas start-up company that is about to launch a lively CD-ROM called Let's Talk About Me that's based on a whole different premise. "We decided to take a girl's world as it exists now and make that world digital," said Laura Groppe, founder of Girl Games. "Let's Talk About Me is not a game.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1997 | RACHEL BECK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Those slash 'em, shoot 'em and kill 'em computer games simply won't do for 11-year-old Susan Grossman. "They're boring and gross, and I don't like playing them," she said. So Susan, a sixth-grader in Westport, Conn., is excited about the new computer games now on the market that pair her interests --fashion, friends and fun--with adventurous computer play. Behind these new girl games are industry giant Mattel and multimedia upstarts like Her Interactive, Girl Games and Purple Moon.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1997 | TROY CORLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sami Berley of West Hills loves computers, but she worries about what some industry pundits call "the geek factor." "I like playing card games, and I'll probably use the computer for my writing, but I definitely don't want to become a computer nerd when I grow up, ooooh, no," says the fourth-grade Girl Scout. Nine-year-old Sami is typical of young computer users, male and female.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2002 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Coming off its phenomenal success with "Shrek," DreamWorks knew its next animated movie, "Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron," was a horse of an altogether different color. The title character narrates the film but neither he nor any other animals talk in the film, only the humans do.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rockett Movado is a self-assured eighth-grader at Whistling Pines Junior High. The spunky redhead who loves art and photography possesses an aura of creativity and independence that suggests she would succeed in whatever career she chooses. That is, unless she wants to write software for girls. That particular line of business has proved to be singularly difficult for nearly every company that has tried it, including Rockett's creator, Purple Moon. The Mountain View, Calif.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2002 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the store mannequins wears a fringed denim skirt riding low on the hips and a top pushed high on the midriff. Another has shorts that roll down on the tummy and a one-shoulder top. The music here is loud, throbbing. But it can't drown out the giggles of shoppers. Yes, giggles. Welcome to the abercrombie in Costa Mesa, a store for kids ages 7 to 14. Known as 'tweens in the marketing world, youngsters in this age group are spending like never before, $90 billion a year, by one estimate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2006 | Robin Abcarian, Times Staff Writer
THE Sausage Casing Girls are everywhere this summer, their muffin tops hanging over their hip-skimming jeans, clothes shrink-wrapped around fleshy bodies that look as if they've been stuffed -- like forcemeat -- into teensy tops and skintight pants. Visit the local mall, any beach boardwalk or the sidewalk in front of your neighborhood high school and you will see why healthcare professionals are so alarmed about expanding waistlines.
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