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Laura Kalpakian

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June 21, 1987 | Judith Freeman, Freeman's forthcoming collection of short stories, "Family Attractions" (Viking), will be published in January
"Crescendo" is Laura Kalpakian's third novel and her fourth book. In her recent collection of short stories ("Fair Augusto and Other Stories"), a wonderful style, rich and varied, was amply evident. Ordinary lives took interesting, quirky or poignant turns--there's a woman who's trying to help a brother who has escaped from prison, a group of Armenian immigrants newly arrived in Los Angeles, a girl who discovers her father's infidelity on an overseas vacation.
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November 7, 1993
It seems to me that if you're going to fire off a sarcastic letter of criticism, you ought to at least get your facts straight, to wit, David E. Ross taking Laura Kalpakian to task ("so distracted . . . I could not finish the review," Book Review, Letters, Oct. 17) for her use of "mathematical terminology she obviously does not understand" in her review of Michael Drinkard's novel "Disobedience." I believe she understands perfectly. Ross cynically derides her use of the term hyperbolically dysfunctional, informing us that she might as well have used triangularly or quadratically.
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BOOKS
February 1, 1987 | Judith Freeman, Freeman has just finished a collection of stories and is at work on a novel.
In two of the stories in this first collection by Laura Kalpakian, the main characters are from small, neighboring towns set deep in the desolate California desert. The towns are called Chagrin, and St. Elmo, the same places that appeared in her 1985 novel, "These Latter Days." In the names of these barren towns, originally settled and still dominated by Mormons, are the keys to her fiction.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | BEVERLY LOWRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Laura Kalpakian's new novel, Elvis is alive and well and not just another pretty face on a postage stamp. Kalpakian places the spirit, music and memory of the man--fat, thin and otherwise--stage center in the life, mind and heart of 42-year old Joyce (a.k.a. Rejoice) Jackson. Joyce lives in St. Elmo, Calif., a fictional town east of Los Angeles, out I-10 in a desert-like poverty-ridden county this side of Palm Springs. She has two daughters, named (what else?) Priscilla and Lisa Marie.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | BEVERLY LOWRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Laura Kalpakian's new novel, Elvis is alive and well and not just another pretty face on a postage stamp. Kalpakian places the spirit, music and memory of the man--fat, thin and otherwise--stage center in the life, mind and heart of 42-year old Joyce (a.k.a. Rejoice) Jackson. Joyce lives in St. Elmo, Calif., a fictional town east of Los Angeles, out I-10 in a desert-like poverty-ridden county this side of Palm Springs. She has two daughters, named (what else?) Priscilla and Lisa Marie.
NEWS
July 14, 1992 | ANN JAPENGA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Japenga is a freelancer writer based in Tacoma
When the faithful hordes stampede the post office next year for the new Elvis Presley stamp, there'll be a new fan among them: novelist Laura Kalpakian. Two years ago Kalpakian regarded Elvis, if she thought of him at all, as a "fat bloated toad of a drug addict" squeezed into a spangled bodysuit. A joke. That was before she actually listened to Elvis' music while writing her novel, "Graced Land."
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | CAROLYN SEE
Dark Continent and Other Stories by Laura Kalpakian (Viking: 259 pages; $17.95.) As much as they might not like to think about it, many writers end up being known by a single novel, a single poem, a single story. (One thinks of James Baldwin, who wrote, and wrote, and wrote, through a long, distinguished life. But more and more people use only one story of his as a password: "You've read 'Sonny's Blues'? Wow! Amazing!
BOOKS
November 7, 1993
It seems to me that if you're going to fire off a sarcastic letter of criticism, you ought to at least get your facts straight, to wit, David E. Ross taking Laura Kalpakian to task ("so distracted . . . I could not finish the review," Book Review, Letters, Oct. 17) for her use of "mathematical terminology she obviously does not understand" in her review of Michael Drinkard's novel "Disobedience." I believe she understands perfectly. Ross cynically derides her use of the term hyperbolically dysfunctional, informing us that she might as well have used triangularly or quadratically.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1993
ABC has set April 18 as the air date for "The Woman Who Loved Elvis," a TV movie starring Tom and Roseanne Arnold. Based on the book "Graced Land" by Laura Kalpakian, the film is about a welfare, the film is about a welfare recipient whose husband leaves her, after which she develops an obsession for Elvis Presley and turns her home into a shrine to "the King."
NEWS
July 14, 1992 | ANN JAPENGA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Japenga is a freelancer writer based in Tacoma
When the faithful hordes stampede the post office next year for the new Elvis Presley stamp, there'll be a new fan among them: novelist Laura Kalpakian. Two years ago Kalpakian regarded Elvis, if she thought of him at all, as a "fat bloated toad of a drug addict" squeezed into a spangled bodysuit. A joke. That was before she actually listened to Elvis' music while writing her novel, "Graced Land."
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | CAROLYN SEE
Dark Continent and Other Stories by Laura Kalpakian (Viking: 259 pages; $17.95.) As much as they might not like to think about it, many writers end up being known by a single novel, a single poem, a single story. (One thinks of James Baldwin, who wrote, and wrote, and wrote, through a long, distinguished life. But more and more people use only one story of his as a password: "You've read 'Sonny's Blues'? Wow! Amazing!
BOOKS
June 21, 1987 | Judith Freeman, Freeman's forthcoming collection of short stories, "Family Attractions" (Viking), will be published in January
"Crescendo" is Laura Kalpakian's third novel and her fourth book. In her recent collection of short stories ("Fair Augusto and Other Stories"), a wonderful style, rich and varied, was amply evident. Ordinary lives took interesting, quirky or poignant turns--there's a woman who's trying to help a brother who has escaped from prison, a group of Armenian immigrants newly arrived in Los Angeles, a girl who discovers her father's infidelity on an overseas vacation.
BOOKS
February 1, 1987 | Judith Freeman, Freeman has just finished a collection of stories and is at work on a novel.
In two of the stories in this first collection by Laura Kalpakian, the main characters are from small, neighboring towns set deep in the desolate California desert. The towns are called Chagrin, and St. Elmo, the same places that appeared in her 1985 novel, "These Latter Days." In the names of these barren towns, originally settled and still dominated by Mormons, are the keys to her fiction.
BOOKS
October 17, 1993
I remember discussing cold fusion (regarding your review of Gary Taubes' "Bad Science" by James Gleick, Book Review, Aug. 22) with my colleagues shortly after the initial press announcements. We all were highly skeptical for many reasons. For one, if successful, the investigators should have died from neutron irradiation. The story was given credence only because it was put forward by reputable scientists, Fleischmann and Pons. The "If True" aspect cannot be as easily dismissed.
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