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Laura Ling

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2010 | Greg Braxton
Noted journalist Laura Ling became an international cause célèbre last year when she and colleague Euna Lee were held captive in Kim Jong Il's North Korea for more than five months after being arrested while investigating human trafficking. More than a year after being released, Ling is marking her return to the airwaves ? landing at the home of a wholly different Kim. The former investigative correspondent for Current TV's "Vanguard" has joined E! Entertainment, the TV network of former sex tape queen turned scenester Kim Kardashian and other celebrity-oriented series that are snarky ( "Chelsea Lately," "The Soup")
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NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
North Korea appears to be missing in an image taken from space. NASA says of the nighttime image, taken from the International Space Station: "North Korea is almost completely dark compared to neighboring South Korea and China. The darkened land appears as if it were a patch of water joining the Yellow Sea to the Sea of Japan. " Capital city Pyongyang has a population of more than 3 million, yet is a tiny island of light. The dictator-ruled nation is in the dark in more ways than one. Electricity is sporadic and unreliable, with those who have it often receiving power only a few hours a day, according to U.S. News & World Report.
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WORLD
June 9, 2009 | By John M. Glionna and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
North Korea's sentencing of two American TV journalists to 12 years of hard labor Monday could imperil the Obama administration's already difficult goal of curtailing the authoritarian nation's nuclear weapons ambitions. If no deal is reached, the two women face a grim future in a brutal prison system notorious for its lack of adequate food and medical supplies and its high death rate. Laura Ling and Euna Lee, reporters for San Francisco-based Current TV, were convicted by the nation's top Central Court of an unspecified "grave crime" against the hard-line regime after they were arrested in March along the Chinese-North Korean border while reporting a story on human trafficking.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2013 | By Don Lee
BEIJING - North Korea on Sunday denied it would use a jailed Korean American as a political bargaining chip, saying it had no plans to invite a prominent American to Pyongyang to seek the release of Kenneth Bae.  Bae, 44, of Lynwood, Wash., was sentenced last week to 15 years of hard labor by the country's highest court for committing “hostile acts” toward the government. Pyongyang has not specified the crimes but said Sunday that Bae entered North Korea with a “disguised identity” and had confessed to the offenses.
WORLD
August 5, 2009 | Jessica Garrison and John M. Glionna
The statement posted on the lauraandeuna.com website said it all: "Our girls are coming home . . . we are counting the seconds to hold Laura and Euna in our arms." In some circles the release of journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee revolved around complex questions of nuclear security and global politics.
WORLD
August 6, 2009 | Raja Abdulrahim and Anna Gorman
The release came suddenly, heralded by a familiar face. In an emotional homecoming Wednesday at Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, journalist Laura Ling told family members and friends about the moment when she and her colleague, Euna Lee, knew they were about to be freed after nearly five months of detention in North Korea. "We feared that at any moment we could be sent to a hard-labor camp," Ling said. "And then suddenly we were told that we were going to a meeting.
WORLD
August 23, 2009 | John M. Glionna
A clandestine network that helps North Koreans escape through China has gone deeper underground because of fears over what authorities in both countries have learned from the capture of two U.S. journalists who were released by Pyongyang this month, a missionary said today. When they were arrested in March, Laura Ling and Euna Lee were reporting on an underground railroad that has helped thousands of people escape from North Korea. "Their arrest reverberated through the aid network," said Tim Peters, a missionary in Seoul who oversees aid work in northeast China.
WORLD
August 4, 2009 | John M. Glionna and Paul Richter
Former President Clinton arrived in North Korea today in a dramatic bid to negotiate the release of two American TV journalists sentenced to 12 years in prison for illegally entering the secretive nation earlier this year. Clinton, the husband of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, is the highest-profile U.S. official to visit North Korea in nearly a decade.
WORLD
March 25, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Two American journalists seized by border guards are facing "intense interrogation" for alleged espionage after illegally crossing into the country from China, a South Korean newspaper reported. Laura Ling and Euna Lee, journalists working for San Francisco-based Current TV, were in Pyongyang's outskirts at a guest house run by North Korean military intelligence, the JoongAng Ilbo newspaper said, citing a South Korean intelligence official. In Washington, a State Department spokesman said North Korea had assured U.S. officials that the journalists would be treated well.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Don Lee
This post has been corrected. See the note below for details. BEIJING -- Adding to the strained relations with the U.S., North Korea said Thursday that an American citizen held since November has been sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for "hostile acts" against the country. Kenneth Bae, a Korean American tour operator from Washington state, was tried Tuesday by the country's highest court,  the official Korean Central News Agency said. The brief dispatch from the capital, Pyongyang, provided no details of any crime.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Don Lee
This post has been corrected. See the note below for details. BEIJING -- Adding to the strained relations with the U.S., North Korea said Thursday that an American citizen held since November has been sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for "hostile acts" against the country. Kenneth Bae, a Korean American tour operator from Washington state, was tried Tuesday by the country's highest court,  the official Korean Central News Agency said. The brief dispatch from the capital, Pyongyang, provided no details of any crime.
WORLD
April 27, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- North Korea said Saturday that a U.S. citizen held since November will be tried on charges of trying to overthrow the government, an offense that could carry the death penalty. The man is 44-year-old Kenneth Bae, also known by his Korean name, Pae Jun Ho, of Lynnwood, Wash. Described as a tour operator, he was arrested in the special economic zones in Rason, in the northeast of the country. "In the process of investigation he admitted that he committed crimes aimed to topple the DPRK [North Korea]
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to The Los Angeles Times
'The World Is Bigger Now: An American Journalist's Release from Captivity in North Korea' by Euna Lee with Lisa Dickey (Broadway Books: 305 pp., $25.) . On March 17, 2009, Euna Lee, a journalist working in China on a documentary about North Korean defectors and her colleague, Laura Ling, were chased by soldiers and, according to Lee, dragged across the border into North Korea. They were arrested for "committing hostilities against the Korean nation," and imprisoned for 140 days.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2010 | Greg Braxton
Noted journalist Laura Ling became an international cause célèbre last year when she and colleague Euna Lee were held captive in Kim Jong Il's North Korea for more than five months after being arrested while investigating human trafficking. More than a year after being released, Ling is marking her return to the airwaves ? landing at the home of a wholly different Kim. The former investigative correspondent for Current TV's "Vanguard" has joined E! Entertainment, the TV network of former sex tape queen turned scenester Kim Kardashian and other celebrity-oriented series that are snarky ( "Chelsea Lately," "The Soup")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2009 | Matea Gold
If Current TV journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee hadn't followed their guide across a frozen river separating China and North Korea on a fateful morning in March, their story about human trafficking in the region would have likely drawn modest attention. Instead, Ling and Lee were captured by North Korean soldiers, creating an international incident that threw the work of their scrappy documentary unit into limbo and brought newfound attention to the program's brand of often-risky investigative journalism.
OPINION
September 1, 2009 | By Laura Ling and Euna Lee
We arrived at the frozen river separating China and North Korea at 5 o'clock on the morning of March 17. The air was crisp and still, and there was no one else in sight. As the sun appeared over the horizon, our guide stepped onto the ice. We followed him. We had traveled to the area to document a grim story of human trafficking for Current TV. During the previous week, we had met and interviewed several North Korean defectors -- women who had fled poverty and repression in their homeland, only to find themselves living in a bleak limbo in China.
NEWS
September 1, 2009
LOS ANGELES, Calif., Sept. 1, 2009 -- The Los Angeles Times today announced the publication of Laura Ling and Euna Lee's first-hand account of the story that took them to the North Korean-Chinese border and the events leading up to their detention in a North Korean prison. The lengthy Op-Ed article will be published on latimes.com tonight and in The Times Wednesday, Sept. 2nd print edition, as well as made available to other publications tomorrow via the LA Times- Washington Post news service.
WORLD
August 23, 2009 | John M. Glionna
A clandestine network that helps North Koreans escape through China has gone deeper underground because of fears over what authorities in both countries have learned from the capture of two U.S. journalists who were released by Pyongyang this month, a missionary said today. When they were arrested in March, Laura Ling and Euna Lee were reporting on an underground railroad that has helped thousands of people escape from North Korea. "Their arrest reverberated through the aid network," said Tim Peters, a missionary in Seoul who oversees aid work in northeast China.
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