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Laurel Canyon Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1985
In Doug Smith's story about Laurel Canyon Park (March 1) I am quoted as attributing the disappearance of the Mulholland Racers to the presence of dogs. Not true. The Racers were a nighttime threat to the park. The gang activity I referred to was drug-related and certainly known to the police, who later were my source for the information about gangs and dogs. Whatever the reason the Racers finally left, the fact remains that we kept them out of the park for five months. Renee Weitzer's hope of compromise with ParkWatch must have died six months ago, since she was present in Councilman Joel Wachs' office when the Fryman proposal was first made last September.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I admit it, I'm a cat person. But after spending an afternoon in the biggest leash-free dog park in Los Angeles County, I decided that my two overstuffed felines lack a certain pizazz. Compared to Bula the poodle, who spent a turbocharged hour wheeling from human to dog to tennis ball in a frenzy of play, my cats are practically comatose. And much as I try to come up with adorable cat stories--did I tell you about the time Malish locked himself in the closet?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1986 | MAYERENE BARKER, Times Staff Writer
More than 100 dog owners who want part of Laurel Canyon Park set aside as a leash-free area for their pets vowed Sunday to fight what they called the increasing police powers of the Los Angeles City Animal Regulation Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1995 | TIM MAY
The Los Angeles city Department of Recreation and Parks may soon approve the hiring of a construction company to complete an improvement project left unfinished by a previous contractor at Laurel Canyon Park in Studio City. The $118,000 project, paid for with voter-approved recreation funds, began in August and was originally scheduled to take only three months to complete. But delays were caused after the original contractor, Travers Construction Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1990 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laurel Canyon Park was permanently designated a part-time, leash-free dog park--the city's first--by the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Commission on Monday, but champions of canine rights still used the occasion to scold the city for ignoring pet owners' needs. The commission action ended a two-year experiment in letting dogs run free at the Laurel Canyon facility, located just south of Mulholland Drive in Councilman Michael Woo's district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1988
Laurel Canyon Park has officially become the first park in Los Angeles where dogs are permitted to run free. Although dog owners for years have used the park atop the Santa Monica Mountains as a leash-free haven for their pets--and city signs for several months have announced that dogs can run free there during certain hours--the six-month pilot project did not officially start until Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1987 | DOUG SMITH, Times Staff Writer
A group of Laurel Canyon parents began gathering signatures Wednesday on petitions seeking renewed enforcement of the city's leash law in a park near their homes that has become a rallying point for dog owners who let their pets run free. About a dozen women and children, some wearing shirts that bore slogans such as "Give a Dog a Bone Not a Park," handed the petition to passing motorists outside the Wonderland Avenue School in Laurel Canyon before school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1985 | DOUG SMITH, Times Staff Writer
Four days after the Los Angeles Animal Regulation Commission ordered a halt to leash-law crackdowns at Laurel Canyon Park, animal control officers returned there Sunday and issued at least four citations. After the raids, two East Valley Animal Shelter employees asserted that the five-member commission's vote Wednesday was advisory and that enforcement of the city's leash law would continue in the park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1986 | MARC IGLER, Times Staff Writer
A group of about 50 dog owners, who want a portion of Laurel Canyon Park set aside as a leash-free area for their pets, demonstrated Saturday in front of the Studio City office of Los Angeles City Councilman Joel Wachs. Members of Park Watch, a 4-year-old group that claims to represent about 550 dog owners, want 1 1/2 acres of the four acres of flat land in the park reserved for dogs to run free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I admit it, I'm a cat person. But after spending an afternoon in the biggest leash-free dog park in Los Angeles County, I decided that my two overstuffed felines lack a certain pizazz. Compared to Bula the poodle, who spent a turbocharged hour wheeling from human to dog to tennis ball in a frenzy of play, my cats are practically comatose. And much as I try to come up with adorable cat stories--did I tell you about the time Malish locked himself in the closet?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1995 | TIM MAY
Attempting to appease angry community members who say a protracted, city financed project has mangled the pastoral, canyon-bed setting of Laurel Canyon Park, the Los Angeles parks department has directed its contractor to skip some planned improvements and finish the work as quickly as possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1994 | JULIE MARKES, For The Times
Up in Laurel Canyon, just below Mulholland Drive and above Studio City, is a little piece of dog heaven. The four-acre Laurel Canyon Park, located west of Laurel Canyon Boulevard, is the only public park in Los Angeles where dogs are exempt from the city's leash laws from 7 to 10 a.m. and from 3 p.m. to sundown daily. Dogs are welcome at other times but must be leashed. On a recent Sunday afternoon, 50 or so dogs had free rein at the park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1991
In the park where we exercise, most dog owners regularly defy leash and pooper-scooper laws. We hope no Laurel Canyon Park privileges are extended to these irresponsible clods until they've cleaned up their acts. SUSU LEVY, ALAN BOCKAL, Encino
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1990
The Los Angeles City Council has done its bit to let Rover be Rover. By a unanimous vote, the Council agreed Friday to designate four-acre Laurel Canyon Park as a permanent haven where dogs may run free, exempt from the city's leash law. Since August, 1988, Laurel Canyon Park--on the south side of Mulholland Drive west of Laurel Canyon Boulevard--has operated as an "experimental" leash-free park for dogs, the only facility of its kind in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1990 | GABE FUENTES and CLAY EVANS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Commission on Monday extended for six months a pilot program allowing dogs to run off-leash in Laurel Canyon Park, and recommended that the City Council set up new dog parks in Griffith Park and the Sepulveda Basin. The commission extended the program, scheduled to expire in March, after dog owners and city staff members gave enthusiastic reports on the success of the controversial pilot project that began in the spring of 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1989
The Los Angeles City Council unanimously approved extending the life of the city's only dog park Wednesday. Under the motion introduced by Councilman Michael Woo, Laurel Canyon Park on Mulholland Drive will remain open to dogs through March 1, 1990, instead of closing in September. In a concession to opponents who said they were awakened by dog barking, the morning hours when dogs can run free of leashes will now be from 7 to 10 a.m., instead of dawn to 9 a.m.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | DAVID WHARTON, Wharton is a Los Angeles free-lance writer. and
Dogs again roam free, beyond the reach of leash or chain, at Laurel Canyon Park. Life there is calm now, the way it used to be. On a typical Saturday afternoon, choruses of crickets sing from the hills above the park and the winds this time of year can blow cold up the canyon from the city below. Dogs, 40 or so at a time, play in packs or pause alone to sniff at scattered, winter-barren trees or dash off suddenly, madly, across four acres of lawn.
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