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Laurel Clark

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NATIONAL
October 29, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Remembered as seven brave explorers, the Columbia astronauts were honored at Cape Canaveral with the unveiling of their names carved into the national Space Mirror Memorial, just six miles from where they rocketed into orbit nine months ago. Covering two panels on the striking monument, which resembles a giant mirror, their names joined those of 17 other astronauts who died doing their jobs. Filling the front row of chairs were the immediate families of Michael P. Anderson, David M.
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NATIONAL
January 31, 2004 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Jon Clark, an Army brat as a boy, an ambitious flight surgeon as a man, has long preferred the cold facts -- "the stats," as he calls them -- to messy emotions. But at home, he realizes now, he was mired in an unspoken competition for his son's love. And, like many fathers, he was losing. "We were buddies and everything," he said. "But I was on the sidelines. He just worshipped his mom." Then, just like that, she was gone.
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NATIONAL
February 2, 2003
Laurel Clark was an outgoing Navy flight surgeon living with her family in Pensacola, Fla., in the mid-1990s when she was encouraged by her husband to apply for the demanding astronaut program. Jonathan Clark, a neurologist then serving in the Navy himself, was thrilled when his wife was selected, friends and relatives said. "He was very proud of her," said Lisa Zeddies, girlfriend of Laurel Clark's brother, Jonathan. "And she gave 110% to everything she did."
SCIENCE
December 26, 2003 | By Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
It was at best a make-work mission. The 80 experiments on the agenda for Columbia's 28th flight had no urgency. Many were high school student projects. In truth, it was a mission meant to maintain momentum. After 13 delays in two years, shuttle planners were impatient to clear the mission from the agency's manifest on Jan. 16. Like a sideshow performer juggling chain saws, NASA could not afford to break its rhythm of launch and recovery. In the third-floor crew quarters several miles from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center, seven men and women sat in chairs while technicians helped them don orange pressure suits.
SCIENCE
December 26, 2003 | By Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
It was at best a make-work mission. The 80 experiments on the agenda for Columbia's 28th flight had no urgency. Many were high school student projects. In truth, it was a mission meant to maintain momentum. After 13 delays in two years, shuttle planners were impatient to clear the mission from the agency's manifest on Jan. 16. Like a sideshow performer juggling chain saws, NASA could not afford to break its rhythm of launch and recovery. In the third-floor crew quarters several miles from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center, seven men and women sat in chairs while technicians helped them don orange pressure suits.
NATIONAL
January 31, 2004 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Jon Clark, an Army brat as a boy, an ambitious flight surgeon as a man, has long preferred the cold facts -- "the stats," as he calls them -- to messy emotions. But at home, he realizes now, he was mired in an unspoken competition for his son's love. And, like many fathers, he was losing. "We were buddies and everything," he said. "But I was on the sidelines. He just worshipped his mom." Then, just like that, she was gone.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe dedicated a memorial to the space shuttle Columbia's astronauts at Arlington National Cemetery, eulogizing them as "pilots, engineers and scientists all motivated by a fire within." The dedication took place a year and a day after the craft disintegrated on its return to Earth, claiming the lives of the crew -- Rick Husband, William McCool, Michael Anderson, David Brown, Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Clark and Ilan Ramon.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Seven asteroids circling the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter are being named for the astronauts who died in the space shuttle Columbia accident, officials announced. Rick D. Husband, William C. McCool, Michael P. Anderson, Kalpana Chawla, David M. Brown and Laurel Clark of NASA and Ilan Ramon of Israel died Feb. 1 when Columbia broke apart.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2003 | Laura King and Rich Connell, Times Staff Writers
For two grueling years, they honed their skills and their characters with hundreds of hours of exacting training. They studied the careers of antique British explorers and, together, climbed rugged mountains in Wyoming. They were a team: Five men and two women. Their leader was Rick D. Husband, an Air Force colonel and father of two who sang solos in his church choir.
NATIONAL
February 14, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
NASA said Thursday that Air Force forensics experts have positively identified the remains of all seven astronauts killed when the space shuttle Columbia was destroyed Feb. 1. The remains were found scattered among pieces of the Columbia's wreckage in central and East Texas. They were taken to Dover Air Force Base, Del., where identities were confirmed through dental records and DNA tests. NASA had previously confirmed the identification of Israeli air force Col.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Remembered as seven brave explorers, the Columbia astronauts were honored at Cape Canaveral with the unveiling of their names carved into the national Space Mirror Memorial, just six miles from where they rocketed into orbit nine months ago. Covering two panels on the striking monument, which resembles a giant mirror, their names joined those of 17 other astronauts who died doing their jobs. Filling the front row of chairs were the immediate families of Michael P. Anderson, David M.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2003
Laurel Clark was an outgoing Navy flight surgeon living with her family in Pensacola, Fla., in the mid-1990s when she was encouraged by her husband to apply for the demanding astronaut program. Jonathan Clark, a neurologist then serving in the Navy himself, was thrilled when his wife was selected, friends and relatives said. "He was very proud of her," said Lisa Zeddies, girlfriend of Laurel Clark's brother, Jonathan. "And she gave 110% to everything she did."
NATIONAL
February 2, 2003
President Bush's remarks Saturday about the space shuttle Columbia, as provided by the White House: My fellow Americans, this day has brought terrible news and great sadness to our country. At 9 a.m. this morning, Mission Control in Houston lost contact with our space shuttle Columbia. A short time later, debris was seen falling from the skies above Texas. The Columbia is lost; there are no survivors. On board was a crew of seven: Col. Rick Husband, Lt. Col. Michael Anderson, Cmdr.
NATIONAL
February 7, 2003 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- Two days after a national memorial service in Houston for Columbia's seven astronauts, Washington said goodbye in its own way Thursday. In a low-key service at Washington National Cathedral, Vice President Dick Cheney told hundreds of mourners: "Every great act of exploration involves great risk. The crew of the Columbia accepted that risk in service to all mankind. The Columbia is lost, but the dreams that inspired its crew remain with us."
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