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Laurel Plaza Mall

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1992 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students from North Hollywood High School--the site of recent race-related violence--will get help landing jobs at Laurel Plaza Mall under an agreement outlined Tuesday by the school, the shopping center developer and the local Chamber of Commerce. Calling the program the first of its kind in Los Angeles, the organizers said they hope to spawn similar efforts in other areas. "We have to go back to this sense of community, where people care about one another," school Principal Catherine Lum said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many North Hollywood residents are not satisfied with proposed solutions to problems that may arise from the expansion of Laurel Plaza Mall, and at least one group has asked the city to withdraw what it called an "inadequate" report on the project. "There still remain significant impacts, and the proposed mitigation measures are not significant," said Bob Carcia, president of a group called Slow the Overdevelopment Process (STOP).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Remedies exist for the potential problems of noise, traffic and pollution raised by homeowners opposed to the expansion of the Laurel Plaza Mall in North Hollywood, Los Angeles city planners have concluded, but the opponents are unconvinced. Proposed in 1988 by Forest City Commercial Development, the $150-million project would replace the small shopping center on Oxnard Street with a mall housing four department stores and a 10-story office tower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1988 | STEVE PADILLA, Times Staff Writer
A lengthy battle is brewing between some North Hollywood residents and developers over plans to expand the Laurel Plaza shopping center. That was the message, at least, from a lengthy public meeting that had been envisioned by the developer as a polite exchange of ideas and information. Instead, the session turned into a tiring, 2 1/2-hour marathon where many residents lashed out at the proposed mall expansion.
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