Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLauren Gregg
IN THE NEWS

Lauren Gregg

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
December 9, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Naming a successor to Tony DiCicco as coach of the world and Olympic champion U.S. women's national soccer team should have been a snap. Instead, U.S. Soccer has turned it into a long, drawn-out melodrama that still has not been resolved. Various names have surfaced as candidates, but no decision has been made. That, to put it bluntly, is a slap in the face for the one person who should have been given the position right away. When DiCicco stepped down Nov. 3, having led the U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 9, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Naming a successor to Tony DiCicco as coach of the world and Olympic champion U.S. women's national soccer team should have been a snap. Instead, U.S. Soccer has turned it into a long, drawn-out melodrama that still has not been resolved. Various names have surfaced as candidates, but no decision has been made. That, to put it bluntly, is a slap in the face for the one person who should have been given the position right away. When DiCicco stepped down Nov. 3, having led the U.S.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 1, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Tonight's game is not the first time the United States has played Germany in a women's world championship; the teams met in the semifinals of the inaugural tournament in 1991. That year, the U.S. was coming off a 7-0 rout of Chinese Taipei in a quarterfinal game in which Michelle Akers scored a world championship-record five goals. Her devastating performance caused the Germans to make a tactical error in the next match, according to then-U.S. coach Anson Dorrance.
SPORTS
December 2, 2007 | Ken Fowler, Special to The Times
He is the winningest coach in NCAA women's soccer, but North Carolina's Anson Dorrance also has helped supply the sport's coaching ranks with his former players. "Part of our philosophy at N.C. is to empower the women we're coaching," Dorrance said. "And part of that empowerment is, we're trying to sell them on considering this as a potential profession. We don't really push them." Dorrance, whose Tar Heels last season brought home their 18th NCAA championship, walks the walk.
SPORTS
April 9, 2005 | Grahame L. Jones, Times Staff Writer
Greg Ryan was named coach of the U.S. women's national soccer team Friday, succeeding April Heinrichs, who resigned in February after coaching the team to the gold medal at last summer's Athens Olympics. Ryan, 48, had been an assistant to Heinrichs for a year. Before that, he coached women's college soccer for 15 years, including stints at Wisconsin, Southern Methodist and, most recently, Colorado College.
SPORTS
June 21, 1999 | MIKE PENNER
The U.S. women's national soccer team has seen its future, and it is colored burnt orange and emerald and silver and blue. And those are just the hairdos. Below the ears, the fanciful Falcons of Nigeria are basically 10 green blurs, 10 frenetic, kinetic whirling devirshes-- grounded, if that's the word for it, by a grandstanding, bandanna-wearing goalkeeper who seems to have culled her sense of on-the-field style from videos of Jorge Campos and Axl Rose. "They're fun to watch," U.S.
SPORTS
December 27, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Following the success of the Women's World Cup over the summer, it didn't take long for some of the ugliness of big-time sports to invade women's soccer. With veterans boycotting for better wages, the United States picked 12 college players for its 18-woman roster for next month's Australia Cup. The veterans on the U.S.
SPORTS
November 4, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They won't have Tony DiCicco to kick around with anymore. The most successful coach in American soccer history, the coach who in the last five years led the U.S. women's national team to Olympic and world championships, resigned Wednesday. DiCicco, 51, said he was doing so in order to spend more time with his wife, Diane, and their four sons. During his 10-year tenure with the national team, he has been away from their Wethersfield, Conn., home more often than not. Enough was finally enough.
SPORTS
July 12, 1999 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Today the world championship, tomorrow the Pyramids? If the victorious U.S. players thought they were going to be taking it easy in the wake of winning the Women's World Cup, they might want to revise their plans. Between now and the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, the world champions will be busier than ever. A victory tour of the U.S. is being finalized for next month and so are not one, but two world tours designed to spread the gospel of women's soccer.
SPORTS
December 25, 1995 | GRAHAME L. JONES
Deep in the Amazon, in the jungle town of Manaus, Brazil completed its 1995 calendar last week by defeating Colombia, 3-1, to finish the year with only one defeat. That lone loss, on penalty kicks to Uruguay in the final of the Copa America, was not a serious enough blemish, however, to prevent FIFA from naming Brazil its No. 1 team for 1995, the second year in a row the Brazilians have held the top spot.
SPORTS
January 19, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On her first day as coach of the U.S. women's national soccer team, April Heinrichs finds herself beset by problems: * There's the contract dispute with U.S. Soccer that has left all 20 members of the 1999 Women's World Cup-winning team "unemployed," to quote Hank Steinbrecher, the federation's secretary general. * There's the difficulty of finding an assistant coach or two, and whether to consider former assistants Lauren Gregg and Jay Hoffman, both of whom wanted the job that is now hers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|