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Lauren Hutton

IMAGE
February 17, 2008 | Melissa Magsaysay, Times Staff Writer
Lauren HUTTON is sitting at her favorite Santa Monica coffee shop, voraciously reading the morning paper.
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NEWS
October 12, 1997 | LEE HARRIS, TIMES WRITER WRITER
The new season of "The Magic School Bus" (KCET, Sunday at 7:30 a.m.) begins with "The Magic School Bus Meets Molly Cule." Wanda's favorite singer, Molly Cule (Wynonna Judd), chooses Ms. Frizzle's class to wash her car. In the second episode (at 8 a.m.), principal Ruhle (Paul Winfield) leaves his beloved chicken, Giblets, in Dorothy Ann's care. As soon as he is gone, Giblets flies away. For ages 2 to 5.
NEWS
March 20, 1988
What a travesty and waste of time, money and talent was ABC's "Perfect People," starring Lauren Hutton and Perry King. It was filled with half-truths, untruths and downright lies about cosmetic surgery and life in general. It depicted a middle-age couple going through drastic life-style changes in search of youth, changes that might have killed them without proper medical advice. Maxwell A. Perro, Panorama City
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1985 | John M. Wilson
When Stacy Keach resurfaces in "Return of Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer," now shooting here, don't look for the private eye to go after any drug dealers. Ditto if there's a series pickup. Since Keach's conviction on cocaine charges and a six-month prison stretch in England, substance abuse has become too awkward as a story element. "Let's just say that as a priority, any story dealing with drugs would be at the bottom of our list," conceded Jay Bernstein, exec producer and Keach's manager.
TRAVEL
January 7, 1996 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
Random House's Literary Breakfasts, at Barneys New York mad.61 restaurant, have become a hot ticket for anyone who loves to talk about books and authors. The panelists are a carefully chosen mix of literary figures, artists and colorful personalities. When the topic was "The Legacy of Dorothy Parker," Kitty Carisle Hart, Brendan Gill, Lauren Hutton, Beverly Sills and Charlie Rose were on the dais. Equally famous New Yorkers often turn up in the audience for the once-a-month 8:30 a.m. breakfasts.
IMAGE
February 17, 2008 | Melissa Magsaysay, Times Staff Writer
WITH Lauren Hutton's laid-back style as a guide, buying for spring has never been easier. The first step is finding a great pair of slouchy, lightweight, full-legged trousers. Then build around them, adding a floral accent such as a vibrant sweater from Dries Van Noten's stellar spring collection, a camp shirt from Phillip Lim or a shibori print blouse from Thakoon that looks as if it could have come from a land far away, instead of from Barneys. Forget the overdone "it" bag and go for something functional and timeless.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1994 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stand-up comedian Bobcat Goldthwait pleaded no contest Wednesday to setting his chair on fire during the May 6 taping of "The Tonight Show With Jay Leno" and was fined $3,888 and ordered to tape public-service announcements to promote a Canoga Park burn center.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Guilty as Charged" (selected theaters) combines political satire and Grand Guignol horror in a consistently fresh and funny way, resulting in an amusing thriller of considerable sophistication. Inspired writer Charles Gale sets up two stories that seem poles apart, but under Sam Irvin's witty, confident direction, they collide deftly and hilariously.
NEWS
August 15, 1986 | United Press International
Way Bandy, the makeup artist who glamorized some of the world's most famous women, including Elizabeth Taylor and Nancy Reagan, has died of AIDS, his agent said. He was 45. Bandy collapsed Aug. 6 and was taken to New York Hospital, where he died Wednesday night, his agent, Helen Murray, said. The cause of death was listed as pneumonia and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus. Murray said Bandy kept his illness secret and worked steadily until his collapse.
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