Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLaurence Austin
IN THE NEWS

Laurence Austin

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997
Re " 'The Man Died Doing What He Loved,' " Jan. 19: Although our family didn't attend the Silent Movie Theater often enough to feel comfortable calling him "Larry," Laurence Austin always recognized us as he sold us tickets, or conversed happily when he took our tickets at the door. And he always pointed, smiling, at the Felix the Cat wristwatch my mother had found for him. This gentle, quirky man had attained what most can only aspire to--the vocation that was his life-long dream, and so perfect for his talents and temperament.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2000
I was saddened and annoyed by the thin-skinned complaints of some Silent Movie Theatre patrons that this week's Laurence Austin tribute is somehow tasteless (" 'Sunrise' Finally to Be Shown at Silent Movie Theatre," by Robin Rauzi, Jan. 15). I sponsor a weekly movie club with friends and we recently gave new theater owner and programmer Charlie Lustman an award for the great job he has done. From the theater's stage he has generously credited both original owners John Hampton and the (face it)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2000
I was saddened and annoyed by the thin-skinned complaints of some Silent Movie Theatre patrons that this week's Laurence Austin tribute is somehow tasteless (" 'Sunrise' Finally to Be Shown at Silent Movie Theatre," by Robin Rauzi, Jan. 15). I sponsor a weekly movie club with friends and we recently gave new theater owner and programmer Charlie Lustman an award for the great job he has done. From the theater's stage he has generously credited both original owners John Hampton and the (face it)
OPINION
May 30, 1999
While I am sad at the sale of the films and memorabilia of the Silent Movie Theatre ("Silent Classics of Ill-Fated Theater Sold at Auction," May 24), at least they will be preserved, if not as an intact collection. I spent a number of enjoyable evenings at the Silent Movie. Alas, I wish I had gone more often. Ironically enough, the last film that I saw there was Erich von Stroheim's "Greed." Apparently James Van Sickle, onetime projectionist at the theater and impatient heir of its murdered host, Laurence Austin, learned nothing from this classic film.
OPINION
May 30, 1999
While I am sad at the sale of the films and memorabilia of the Silent Movie Theatre ("Silent Classics of Ill-Fated Theater Sold at Auction," May 24), at least they will be preserved, if not as an intact collection. I spent a number of enjoyable evenings at the Silent Movie. Alas, I wish I had gone more often. Ironically enough, the last film that I saw there was Erich von Stroheim's "Greed." Apparently James Van Sickle, onetime projectionist at the theater and impatient heir of its murdered host, Laurence Austin, learned nothing from this classic film.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1997
It is hoped that the tremendous outpouring of sympathy and outrage at the senseless death of Laurence Austin will indeed bring about some means of keeping the Silent Movie Showcase alive ("Silent Movie Showcase Should Be Living Memorial," by Jim Gates, Counterpunch, Jan. 27). This was one of the great undiscovered treasures in Los Angeles--an evening at the theater with films that simply were unavailable anywhere else, with live music that really brought the images on the screen to life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1997
The Silent Movie Theater on Fairfax has been for many years a charming, welcome respite from the outside world, an insular rarefied haven for those of us who are aficionados of a very special art form ("Academy Archivist Seeks to Save Silent Film Showcase," Jan. 24). And no one more typified this bygone era of glamour and mystery than the lionized figure of Laurence Austin. His royal visage and regal bearing were magnetic. When he walked to the front of the theater to announce the night's program, he would proudly march down the aisle to the strains of "Pomp and Circumstance" and it seemed so right.
NEWS
January 15, 2004
The Silent Movie Theater marks the seventh anniversary of the fatal shooting the theater's then-proprietor, Laurence Austin, with a screening of F.W. Murnau's 1928 classic "Sunrise," which was about to start when Austin was shot to death in the lobby by a killer hired by his estranged companion- projectionist, James Van Sickle. Both the gunman and Van Sickle are serving life sentences. "Sunrise," Friday, 8 p.m., Silent Movie Theater, 611 N. Fairfax Ave., (323) 655-2520.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1997
The Largo Restaurant, 432 N. Fairfax Ave., will hold a tribute/benefit in memory of Laurence Austin, proprietor of the nearby Silent Movie Showcase, on Wednesday at 8 p.m. and again at 10:15 p.m. There will be live entertainment, along with clips from Austin's favorite films, accompanied on the organ by Jon Brion and Bob Mitchell. Proceeds will go to Austin's company, Shape of Laughter Productions. Reservations and information: (213) 852-1073.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1997
Seeking public help to solve a baffling murder, Los Angeles police Friday released a composite sketch of the man who allegedly killed the proprietor of the Silent Movie theater in the Fairfax district last week. Meanwhile, city officials announced a $25,000 reward for information leading to the killer's arrest and conviction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1997
It is hoped that the tremendous outpouring of sympathy and outrage at the senseless death of Laurence Austin will indeed bring about some means of keeping the Silent Movie Showcase alive ("Silent Movie Showcase Should Be Living Memorial," by Jim Gates, Counterpunch, Jan. 27). This was one of the great undiscovered treasures in Los Angeles--an evening at the theater with films that simply were unavailable anywhere else, with live music that really brought the images on the screen to life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1997
The Silent Movie Theater on Fairfax has been for many years a charming, welcome respite from the outside world, an insular rarefied haven for those of us who are aficionados of a very special art form ("Academy Archivist Seeks to Save Silent Film Showcase," Jan. 24). And no one more typified this bygone era of glamour and mystery than the lionized figure of Laurence Austin. His royal visage and regal bearing were magnetic. When he walked to the front of the theater to announce the night's program, he would proudly march down the aisle to the strains of "Pomp and Circumstance" and it seemed so right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997
Re " 'The Man Died Doing What He Loved,' " Jan. 19: Although our family didn't attend the Silent Movie Theater often enough to feel comfortable calling him "Larry," Laurence Austin always recognized us as he sold us tickets, or conversed happily when he took our tickets at the door. And he always pointed, smiling, at the Felix the Cat wristwatch my mother had found for him. This gentle, quirky man had attained what most can only aspire to--the vocation that was his life-long dream, and so perfect for his talents and temperament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1997
The flowers and messages that still adorn the now-shuttered Silent Movie Showcase on Fairfax Avenue testify to the deep affection many in this city have for those early movies. But with the Jan. 17 slaying of theater operator Laurence Austin, in an apparent holdup, the film capital of the world may be without a permanent venue for exhibition of these precious reels. That need not be the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2000
Richard Dreyfuss and Marsha Mason headline in L.A. Theatre Works' live radio-theater production of Neil Simon's comedy "The Prisoner of Second Avenue." Dreyfuss and Mason, who starred in the hit London West End production, reprise their roles as a long-married New York couple trapped in high-rise hell. * "The Prisoner of Second Avenue," Skirball Cultural Center, 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd. Today and Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 2 p.m.; Sunday, 4 and 7:30 p.m. Ends Sunday. $31 to $35. (310) 827-0889.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|