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Laurence Dworet

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993
I am writing in response to Robert W. Welkos' article "A New Yorker Writer Unleashes the Most Virulent Strain of All: Movie Producers" (Film Clips, Feb. 28) The article implies that my writing partner, Laurence Dworet, and I are ripping off Richard Preston's article in our "Virus" project for Arnold Kopelson and Warners. Nothing could be further from the truth. Preston is a little naive if he thinks that by writing one article in the New Yorker he somehow owns an entire subject.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1995 | Judy Brennan
Laurence Dworet knows his combat zones--especially those combat zones called emergency rooms, where doctors head into battle to save lives with a scalpel and a prayer. And those combat zones called story meetings, where strategy is boiled down to a twist on an idea and experience in another field is the winning edge. Dworet, 44, is a veteran emergency room physician cum screenwriter tapped by his longtime friend, producer Arnold Kopelson, to co-write Warner Bros.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1995 | Judy Brennan
Laurence Dworet knows his combat zones--especially those combat zones called emergency rooms, where doctors head into battle to save lives with a scalpel and a prayer. And those combat zones called story meetings, where strategy is boiled down to a twist on an idea and experience in another field is the winning edge. Dworet, 44, is a veteran emergency room physician cum screenwriter tapped by his longtime friend, producer Arnold Kopelson, to co-write Warner Bros.'
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1993
I am writing in response to Robert W. Welkos' article "A New Yorker Writer Unleashes the Most Virulent Strain of All: Movie Producers" (Film Clips, Feb. 28) The article implies that my writing partner, Laurence Dworet, and I are ripping off Richard Preston's article in our "Virus" project for Arnold Kopelson and Warners. Nothing could be further from the truth. Preston is a little naive if he thinks that by writing one article in the New Yorker he somehow owns an entire subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fragile and difficult nature of putting together big Hollywood movies was underscored this week when the race to make two competing virus movies intensified between 20th Century Fox and Warner Bros. On Thursday, Fox-based producer Lynda Obst was struggling to save director Ridley Scott from falling out of her movie "Hot Zone," which is scheduled to begin production May 15.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1995 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Outbreak," starring Dustin Hoffman encased in a germ-free suit and helmet, is the kind of movie that's usually described as "visceral." It sure ain't "cerebral." Despite a lot of high-tech gizmology and oodles of data about hemorrhagic fevers and viral strains, it's basically a so-spreadable-it's-incredible creeping glop movie. It's a B-movie with A-accouterments.
MAGAZINE
August 19, 1990 | J.G.
There are 3 million stories in the naked city, and most of them are screenplays. Since the explosion of the spec script market during the past year, everyone, it seems, has an idea for the next high-concept blockbuster. Working without a studio contract, veterans and newcomers alike are free to tell their story their way. Some of them are even lucky enough to sell it. After the sale of Joe Eszterhas' "Basic Instinct" for $3 million, the Hollywood buzz virtually broke the sound barrier.
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