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Laurence J Peter

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January 15, 1990 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laurence J. Peter, the psychologist and professor of education whose 1969 book "The Peter Principle" unmasked incompetents with searing satire and contributed a phrase to the language, has died of complications from a stroke, his wife said Sunday. Peter, 70, had also suffered from heart trouble before he died in his sleep Friday at his home in Palos Verdes Estates, said his wife, Irene. He had suffered a stroke two years ago, she said.
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NEWS
January 15, 1990 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laurence J. Peter, the psychologist and professor of education whose 1969 book "The Peter Principle" unmasked incompetents with searing satire and contributed a phrase to the language, has died of complications from a stroke, his wife said Sunday. Peter, 70, had also suffered from heart trouble before he died in his sleep Friday at his home in Palos Verdes Estates, said his wife, Irene. He had suffered a stroke two years ago, she said.
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NEWS
February 2, 1987 | Jack Smith
Milton Most, a commissioner of the Superior Court in San Fernando, has sent me a story that suggests the truth of the old saw that the line between sanity and insanity is very fine. Most and I were classmates at Belmont High School, and his long career as a jurist has fulfilled our motto--"Enter to learn, go forth to serve." Some years ago, when he was practicing law, he had a client who had been in and out of several mental institutions. To protect his privacy, Most calls him Sam.
MAGAZINE
May 29, 1988 | JACK SMITH
ANYONE WHO is married to, works with or is otherwise in daily proximity to a person who has a gift for making malapropisms is indeed favored by the gods. A malapropism (malaprop, for short) is a ludicrous misuse of words, especially through confusion caused by resemblance of sound. The matron saint of malapropists, of course, was Mrs. Malaprop herself, a character in the play, "The Rivals," who observed, for example, that "allegories live on the banks of the Nile."
NEWS
November 25, 1986 | Jack Smith
By now the miniseries "Fresno" will be history. I'm sure it will have made hardly a ripple on the national culture. The question is--what will it have done to Fresno? As Times staff writer Steve Harvey reported from that city after a special theater showing of the first episode, there wasn't any cheering in the streets. The only thing the glitzy (for Fresno) audience had to applaud was a shot of the city's historic water tower in the opening scene.
MAGAZINE
January 25, 1987 | JACK SMITH
Back in the 1960s it was widely believed that God was dead, and humor seemed to have gone with him. God seems to have made a comeback; I'm not sure about humor. In the Iranian arms scandal, our political columnists and pundits tore their hair out with anguish and consternation, but except for Art Buchwald and a handful of cartoonists and maybe a few stand-up comedians, no one seemed to think that the Administration's predicament was funny.
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