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Laurence Leamer

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November 29, 1992
For a multigenerational book on the Kennedy women, I would appreciate any information or anecdotes. LAURENCE LEAMER 2501 M Street, N.W., No. 712 Washington, D.C. 20037
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BOOKS
July 17, 2005 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel reviews movies for Time and is a contributing writer to Book Review. He is the author of many books, including the forthcoming "Elia Kazan: A Biography."
Arnold SCHWARZENEGGER never wanted to be an actor. He says so on Page 128 of "Fantastic," Laurence Leamer's dully dutiful biography. He wanted to be rich. He wanted to be famous. He wanted to be powerful. He thought he could grope women with impunity, Leamer says. He wanted, in short, to be a star, a role in which acting is an option but does not need to be wholeheartedly embraced.
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BOOKS
February 15, 1987
For a book on Johnny Carson and popular American culture, I would appreciate any anecdotes and remembrances, large or small. My phone number is (213) 450-1160. LAURENCE LEAMER Santa Monica
BOOKS
February 15, 1998 | KEN EMERSON, Ken Emerson is the author of "Doo-dah!: Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture."
The days are long gone when "country music" meant a twangy song about heartbreak playing on a jukebox somewhere in middle America. In December, during that all-important shopping week before Christmas, the biggest-selling CD in the nation was Garth Brooks' "Sevens," and two other country performers also landed in the nation's top 10. Coinciding with that, President Clinton also nominated William J. Ivey, head of the Country Music Foundation, to chair the National Endowment for the Arts.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
Laurence Leamer's latest celebrity biography, the sensational "King of the Night: The Life of Johnny Carson," is a top 10 best-selling book across America. And yet, Leamer told his audience at the Round Table West luncheon at the Balboa Bay Club on Tuesday, "in the Los Angeles area you wouldn't know it." He said "AM Los Angeles" booked him as a guest, but "they canceled." He said "Entertainment Tonight" "won't touch the book." He said the CNN "entertainment reporter won't deal with it."
BOOKS
June 1, 1986 | Charles Champlin
Actors are not like other men; actresses are not like other women. While they may also be greatly different one from another, whatever it is that impels them to practice make-believe as a public art makes them kin to each other, and sets them apart from writers and priests, teachers, geologists, cooks and accountants.
BOOKS
September 11, 1994 | Marie Brenner, Marie Brenner is a staff writer at The New Yorker. Her most recent book is "House of Dreams: The Collapse of an American Dynasty" (Avon)
The Kennedy women, like their brothers and husbands, were trained to merchandise the family mythology, no matter what. They were pressed into service most effectively in late October, 1960, the final week of the presidential campaign. Across America, television viewers turned on their sets to see "At Home With the Kennedys," one of the earliest attempts to sell a presidential candidate as if he were a mere celebrity.
BOOKS
July 23, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
It's no accident that the title "King of the Night" carries dark-side connotations. Laurence Leamer's objective is to expose the seamy underbelly of the affable host of "The Tonight Show," a man whose long-lived popularity defies all laws of the entertainment world. Leamer appears to have interviewed hundreds of Carson acquaintances, from Omaha to Hollywood.
BOOKS
July 17, 2005 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel reviews movies for Time and is a contributing writer to Book Review. He is the author of many books, including the forthcoming "Elia Kazan: A Biography."
Arnold SCHWARZENEGGER never wanted to be an actor. He says so on Page 128 of "Fantastic," Laurence Leamer's dully dutiful biography. He wanted to be rich. He wanted to be famous. He wanted to be powerful. He thought he could grope women with impunity, Leamer says. He wanted, in short, to be a star, a role in which acting is an option but does not need to be wholeheartedly embraced.
BOOKS
February 15, 1998 | KEN EMERSON, Ken Emerson is the author of "Doo-dah!: Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture."
The days are long gone when "country music" meant a twangy song about heartbreak playing on a jukebox somewhere in middle America. In December, during that all-important shopping week before Christmas, the biggest-selling CD in the nation was Garth Brooks' "Sevens," and two other country performers also landed in the nation's top 10. Coinciding with that, President Clinton also nominated William J. Ivey, head of the Country Music Foundation, to chair the National Endowment for the Arts.
BOOKS
September 11, 1994 | Marie Brenner, Marie Brenner is a staff writer at The New Yorker. Her most recent book is "House of Dreams: The Collapse of an American Dynasty" (Avon)
The Kennedy women, like their brothers and husbands, were trained to merchandise the family mythology, no matter what. They were pressed into service most effectively in late October, 1960, the final week of the presidential campaign. Across America, television viewers turned on their sets to see "At Home With the Kennedys," one of the earliest attempts to sell a presidential candidate as if he were a mere celebrity.
BOOKS
November 29, 1992
For a multigenerational book on the Kennedy women, I would appreciate any information or anecdotes. LAURENCE LEAMER 2501 M Street, N.W., No. 712 Washington, D.C. 20037
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
Laurence Leamer's latest celebrity biography, the sensational "King of the Night: The Life of Johnny Carson," is a top 10 best-selling book across America. And yet, Leamer told his audience at the Round Table West luncheon at the Balboa Bay Club on Tuesday, "in the Los Angeles area you wouldn't know it." He said "AM Los Angeles" booked him as a guest, but "they canceled." He said "Entertainment Tonight" "won't touch the book." He said the CNN "entertainment reporter won't deal with it."
BOOKS
July 23, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
It's no accident that the title "King of the Night" carries dark-side connotations. Laurence Leamer's objective is to expose the seamy underbelly of the affable host of "The Tonight Show," a man whose long-lived popularity defies all laws of the entertainment world. Leamer appears to have interviewed hundreds of Carson acquaintances, from Omaha to Hollywood.
BOOKS
February 15, 1987
For a book on Johnny Carson and popular American culture, I would appreciate any anecdotes and remembrances, large or small. My phone number is (213) 450-1160. LAURENCE LEAMER Santa Monica
BOOKS
June 1, 1986 | Charles Champlin
Actors are not like other men; actresses are not like other women. While they may also be greatly different one from another, whatever it is that impels them to practice make-believe as a public art makes them kin to each other, and sets them apart from writers and priests, teachers, geologists, cooks and accountants.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1987 | Donna Rosenthal
Laurence Leamer, who penned bios of Ingrid Bergman ("As Time Goes By") and Ron and Nancy ("Make Believe"), will be getting a six-figure advance from William Morrow for an unauthorized life story of Johnny Carson. "It's hard to believe that no one has done an in-depth look at Carson's life," Leamer said. "He's been part of our cultural furniture for 25 years." But Leamer thinks he'll have problems getting to the three-ex Mrs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1988
Russell Jacoby (Op-Ed Page, April 23) condemns "kiss and tell memoirs." He decries the debased level of political discourse. What he is really saying is that in the name of taste, we should limit freedom of the press. It is nonsense to call insider memoirs "gossip." If Larry Speakes is telling the truth about making up quotes, his statement is not gossip at all. It's the truth. Jacoby writes that such books are "completely irrelevant, since they illuminate no issues or problems."
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