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Laurence Luckinbill

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Andrew Bergman summed up what's wrong with his play "Social Security" (at the Ahmanson) in a line in the second act: "Things happen, people evolve, and all we do is comment on everything." It's too true, and it's spoken by Barbara (Lucie Arnaz) to husband David (Laurence Luckinbill), the play's ostensible leading characters. These characters don't lead; they follow. Most of the script is nothing but Barbara and David's joke book about the peripheral characters' crises.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
In mid-January, Laurence Luckinbill will go to Austin, Tex., for a 3-day run of his one-man show "Lyndon Johnson." Playing L.B.J. in Austin is fairly comparable to doing J.F.K. in Hyannisport, Mass., H.S.T. in Independence, Mo., or F.D.R. in Hyde Park, N.Y. It has to be daunting for Luckinbill. Lyndon Johnson died only 15 years ago and memories will be fresh. "I will stop in Johnson City and ask for an L.B.J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1985 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
Lucie Arnaz grew up in the shadow of television's biggest female star--her mother, Lucille Ball. So it isn't surprising that when she decided to grab a bit of the spotlight for herself, she didn't try to do it in a TV series. In fact, she has consciously avoided the form for 10 years. "Until I had accomplished something on my own and developed my own following, it would have been the kiss of death to go on TV (in a series)," she reasoned. "It would have been too much of a mountain to climb.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Andrew Bergman summed up what's wrong with his play "Social Security" (at the Ahmanson) in a line in the second act: "Things happen, people evolve, and all we do is comment on everything." It's too true, and it's spoken by Barbara (Lucie Arnaz) to husband David (Laurence Luckinbill), the play's ostensible leading characters. These characters don't lead; they follow. Most of the script is nothing but Barbara and David's joke book about the peripheral characters' crises.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
In mid-January, Laurence Luckinbill will go to Austin, Tex., for a 3-day run of his one-man show "Lyndon Johnson." Playing L.B.J. in Austin is fairly comparable to doing J.F.K. in Hyannisport, Mass., H.S.T. in Independence, Mo., or F.D.R. in Hyde Park, N.Y. It has to be daunting for Luckinbill. Lyndon Johnson died only 15 years ago and memories will be fresh. "I will stop in Johnson City and ask for an L.B.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Lucille Ball's daughter, Lucie Arnaz, plans to produce a musical about her father, the late Cuban bandleader and TV star Desi Arnaz. "My father wrote a book years ago about coming to this country and his band and all that, and was always talking about turning it into a musical. And finally he said, 'What the hell. I'll never make it. You try,' " she said in this Sunday's issue of Parade magazine. Her father died in 1986.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1992
As the author of the play, "Lyndon," which Jack Klugman originated and Laurence Luckinbill has played so brilliantly on television and the stage, I was deeply moved by Joanne Harrison's affectionate look at L.B.J.'s Neighborhood Youth Corps and the purpose it gave to her life. The Vietnam War did him in, but Lyndon Johnson meant it when he said, "I wanted to be the President who educated young children, who helped to feed the hungry, who helped the poor to find their own way and who protected the right of every citizen to vote in every election."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
"Messenger of Death" (citywide) is a solid, efficient mystery, crisply directed by J. Lee Thompson and adapted by the veteran Paul Jarrico from a novel by Rex Burns. In this eighth teaming of Charles Bronson and Thompson, Bronson plays a Denver-based investigative reporter, a local celebrity equally capable of taking care of himself at a high-society gala or in a fistfight.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1985 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
Lucie Arnaz grew up in the shadow of television's biggest female star--her mother, Lucille Ball. So it isn't surprising that when she decided to grab a bit of the spotlight for herself, she didn't try to do it in a TV series. In fact, she has consciously avoided the form for 10 years. "Until I had accomplished something on my own and developed my own following, it would have been the kiss of death to go on TV (in a series)," she reasoned. "It would have been too much of a mountain to climb.
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