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Laurence Michael Powell

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NEWS
April 30, 1992 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen
The four officers on trial and the charges filed against them: SGT. STACEY CORNELL KOON Age 41, the ranking supervisor at the scene, a 14-year veteran at the time of the beating. His job history shows that he was suspended for five days but did not appeal to the department's Board of Rights, so no public record of the case is available.
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NEWS
September 27, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five and a half years after exploding across Los Angeles, the Rodney G. King beating case quietly reached what appears to be its final milestone Thursday as a sparsely attended federal court hearing effectively closed out the episode that reshaped the city's legal and political landscape. "It's done," Michael Stone, the longtime friend and lawyer of former Police Officer Laurence M. Powell, said as he emerged from the hearing. "It's finally done." U.S. District Judge John G.
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NEWS
May 21, 1991 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Los Angeles police officers indicted in the Rodney G. King case have told department investigators that they feared for their lives during the beating of the motorist and were ready to shoot him if necessary. The officers' first detailed account of their actions is contained in a comprehensive 314-page Los Angeles Police Department Internal Affairs report on the incident, obtained Monday by The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1996
A federal appeals court on Wednesday denied efforts by two former Los Angeles police officers to win city reimbursement for $500,000 in legal fees they spent defending themselves against a lawsuit brought and won by Rodney G. King. The unanimous ruling by a three judge-panel from the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals concluded that a judge was right to rule that Sgt. Stacey C. Koon and Officer Laurence M. Powell acted with "actual malice" in beating King after a chase on March 3, 1991.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | DAVID SAVAGE and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that sends the Rodney G. King police beating case back to Los Angeles for at least one more hearing, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously found Thursday that King's "misconduct" and the burden of a double trial justified the lenient, 30-month sentences imposed on two officers found guilty of violating his civil rights.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | LESLIE BERGER and JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A high school honors student, a devoted father of five, a small-town cop from Kansas and a kid brother who followed his older brother across the country--these are the four Los Angeles police officers indicted in the beating of Rodney G. King. At least two have histories of disciplinary action and two have some time in college. One joined the department less than a year ago. One was raised by parents who brought multiracial foster children into their home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
District attorney officials, saying that more than three Los Angeles police officers should be prosecuted for the videotaped beating of an Altadena man, announced Friday they will seek grand jury indictments in an attempt to speed the volatile case through the criminal justice system. Also Friday, Assistant Dist. Atty. Curt Livesay said his office has decided against prosecuting Rodney G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1993 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Los Angeles police officers Stacey C. Koon and Laurence M. Powell will spend the next 30 months at a prison without walls, fences, bars, gun towers or guns. At the Federal Prison Camp at Dublin, guards wear gray slacks and maroon ties, escapees are called walkaways and the only boundary separating freedom from imprisonment is an imaginary line encircling the facility. Prison camps are the least guarded institutions in the federal prison system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1994 | MARK SABBATINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Calling them "the first political prisoners in the history of our country," more than 200 people were present at a rally Saturday to protest the extension of jail sentences given to two former Los Angeles Police Department officers convicted in the beating of Rodney G. King. Family and friends of ex-Officer Laurence M. Powell and ex-Sgt. Stacey C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The key testimony of a California Highway Patrol officer against four policemen charged in the assault on Rodney G. King was sharply contradicted Monday when she was shown a copy of a report in which she said the black motorist "kicked and punched" the police.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | DAVID SAVAGE and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a ruling that sends the Rodney G. King police beating case back to Los Angeles for at least one more hearing, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously found Thursday that King's "misconduct" and the burden of a double trial justified the lenient, 30-month sentences imposed on two officers found guilty of violating his civil rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While conservatives attended a fund-raising dinner Thursday evening for former Los Angeles Police Officer Laurence M. Powell, convicted of beating Rodney G. King, civil rights activists protested outside. The dinner for Powell, who delivered most of the blows to King during the 1991 videotaped incident, drew about 100 supporters, who touted Powell as a good-hearted officer victimized by overzealous federal prosecutors and unfair news media. The Rev.
NEWS
February 21, 1996 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The two former Los Angeles police officers who are trying to avoid more prison time for the beating of motorist Rodney G. King found an unlikely ally Tuesday at the Supreme Court in Justice Stephen G. Breyer, a moderate-liberal appointed by President Clinton. Breyer, joined by several justices, commented during the oral argument of the case that trial judges should have flexibility to set the proper sentence, especially in unusual cases.
NEWS
February 14, 1996 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The welcome home party for former LAPD Officer Laurence M. Powell has been rescheduled for next week in Washington, and Powell, convicted of violating the civil rights of Rodney G. King, is using the occasion to try to add to his legal defense fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The much-anticipated U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments Tuesday in the case of two police officers convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights were a casualty of the snowstorm that has gripped the northeastern United States since the weekend. Although the Supreme Court has been virtually the only government institution in Washington to put in full workdays this week, William Kopeny, who was planning to present the argument for Officer Laurence M.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of legal battles and social upheaval, the case that helped shape the modern history of Los Angeles makes its way this week to the nation's highest court, where government lawyers and attorneys for two former police officers will engage in what could be the last debate of the Rodney G. King beating. As the saga marks yet another milestone, the principals still are battling to put their lives in order.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1993 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laurence M. Powell and Stacey C. Koon surrendered to federal prison authorities Tuesday, ending their long effort to avoid incarceration and beginning their 30-month sentences for violating the civil rights of Rodney G. King. After spending a final weekend with their families, Koon and Powell arrived at the Federal Prison Camp in Dublin, Calif., at 11:50 a.m., just before the noon deadline. Neither had any comment, but in Los Angeles, their lawyers said the two men were resigned to their fate.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | KEVIN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first reunion of jurors in the Rodney G. King civil rights trial was punctuated Saturday by complaints from five jurors that Officer Laurence M. Powell and Sgt. Stacey C. Koon should have received longer prison sentences than the 2 1/2-year terms handed down Wednesday. One in the group, who wished to only be identified as Juror No. 3, had tears well in his eyes as he denounced the sentence by U.S. District Judge John G.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1995
A federal court judge has rejected a conservative legal group's request for an order reversing the cancellation of a "welcome home" party at the Police Academy for former LAPD Officer Laurence M. Powell when he completes his sentence for beating Rodney G. King. U.S. District Court Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr. on Monday denied a request for a temporary restraining order, without comment.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | MARC LACEY
When former LAPD Officer Laurence M. Powell, convicted of violating Rodney G. King's civil rights, is released from a halfway house in Garden Grove this month, don't expect him to fade away. Some conservative activists in Washington are working aggressively to turn him into a cause celebre. He is not a vicious cop to members of the Legal Affairs Council, one of the many ideological fund-raising concerns operating in the nation's capital.
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