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Laurent De Brunhoff

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December 24, 1989 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This small college town is home to a clock tower, an old-fashioned diner, a main street called Main Street and one of history's legendary elephants. Most people probably believe that this benevolent beast, known round the world by the nonsense name of Babar, lives in a forest whose capital is Celesteville. Followers of Babar's nearly 60 years of adventures would place that expanse of greenery somewhere near Paris.
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NEWS
December 24, 1989 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This small college town is home to a clock tower, an old-fashioned diner, a main street called Main Street and one of history's legendary elephants. Most people probably believe that this benevolent beast, known round the world by the nonsense name of Babar, lives in a forest whose capital is Celesteville. Followers of Babar's nearly 60 years of adventures would place that expanse of greenery somewhere near Paris.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1989
That famous elephant Babar, already the star of a slew of children's books, is making the jump to TV. HBO plans to run 13 episodes of an animated "Babar" series, beginning April 2. The shows will feature new stories as well as adaptations of the famous books by Jean and Laurent de Brunhoff.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2006 | From Reuters
Babar the Elephant, a timeless figure in children's literature, turns 75 this year, his trademark crown and green suit unmarked by changing fashions or criticism that his jungle realm is a relic of colonialism. Babar was created one evening in 1931 when Cecile de Brunhoff, a piano teacher, told her two small sons the story of an elephant whose mother was killed by hunters and who fled to a town where he learned to dress as a human.
NEWS
February 24, 2004
What you won't see at the new Mammoth Ski Museum, opening Saturday: kitschy memorabilia in the form of authentic skis, poles and boots. You will see "Introducing the Fine Art of Skiing: A First Run Through the Beekley Collection." That would be Mason Beekley, founder of the International Skiing History Assn., whose boyhood collection of ski books grew over 50 years to include 10,000 works. Beekley arranged for his obsession to migrate from New Hartford, Conn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
"Babar," a new animated series that debuts on HBO Sunday at 8 a.m., captures the look and much of the charm of Jean and Laurent de Brunhoff's popular children's books. Babar, the king of the elephants, never allows his duties to interfere with the needs of his children. Most of each program is devoted to a story about his childhood that shows his offspring how to deal with a problem. In the second episode (airing April 9), Babar finds his son, Cornelius, trying to impress a new friend.
NEWS
September 26, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
Theodor Geisel "disarmed everyone," according to one fan. And "everyone" includes the authors of several best-selling children's books: * Eric Carle ("The Very Hungry Caterpillar" and "The Very Busy Spider"): "When I first encountered Dr. Seuss' works, I was taken aback--perhaps a typical grown-up reaction. But then the child in me was drawn to these strange creatures and stories again and again, and slowly I was pulled into the magic of this genius."
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The elephant long has been considered a symbol of good luck in many cultures. And this year, Babar, one of the world's most beloved pachyderms, turns 60. Jean Laurent de Brunhoff's King of the Elephants didn't move from the printed page to animated life until 1989. The syndicated cartoon is soon moving from HBO, where Babar and Celeste and the rest of the elephant kingdom nestled for four years, to the Family Channel.
NEWS
July 26, 1998 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Long Live Happiness!" --Babar * Babar, the plump and benevolent elephant king who loves bright green suits, shiny red roadsters and cradle-to-grave social welfare, has enjoyed many adventures in his long and mostly felicitous fictional life. He has honeymooned in a hot-air balloon, been abducted (gently) by aliens and even survived a visit to New York City. But until recently, Babar had been deprived of the most life-altering experience of all--going to college.
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