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Laurie Crews

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March 11, 1994 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a boat being pulled from the still water of Little Lake Nellie, not far from the dock where Tim Crews and Steve Olin were killed last spring. That dock, once thought to be too long, is on dry land now. The lake is down this year and the shore is about 75 feet away. The first time Laurie Crews walked from her house to see where her husband's boat had rammed that dock was the day of his funeral.
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SPORTS
March 11, 1994 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a boat being pulled from the still water of Little Lake Nellie, not far from the dock where Tim Crews and Steve Olin were killed last spring. That dock, once thought to be too long, is on dry land now. The lake is down this year and the shore is about 75 feet away. The first time Laurie Crews walked from her house to see where her husband's boat had rammed that dock was the day of his funeral.
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SPORTS
April 6, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monday was supposed to be the day the Cleveland Indians celebrated baseball again. Monday, they bravely promised themselves, would be the day they put aside tragedy and began worrying only about games again. That promise was broken before the first pitch. Relief pitcher Kevin Wickander greeted Patti Olin behind home plate after the Indians had presented her the jersey of her late husband, Steve. "Are you OK?" Wickander asked. "Fine," she said. "Are you OK?" "Sure, I'm OK," he said.
SPORTS
April 6, 1993 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monday was supposed to be the day the Cleveland Indians celebrated baseball again. Monday, they bravely promised themselves, would be the day they put aside tragedy and began worrying only about games again. That promise was broken before the first pitch. Relief pitcher Kevin Wickander greeted Patti Olin behind home plate after the Indians had presented her the jersey of her late husband, Steve. "Are you OK?" Wickander asked. "Fine," she said. "Are you OK?" "Sure, I'm OK," he said.
SPORTS
March 25, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came from all over the state and points beyond, including Kirk Gibson, Sparky Anderson, Don Fehr and Gene Michael. The Dodgers sent two busloads, carrying almost their entire team. All of the Cleveland Indians were there. They came to grieve collectively, but each with a different intensity. Some hoped Wednesday night's memorial service would put an end to the emotion they have felt over the tragic death of Tim Crews and Steve Olin.
SPORTS
March 28, 1993 | From Associated Press
Cleveland Indian pitcher Tim Crews, killed in a boating accident last Monday, was eulogized at St. Luke's United Methodist Church on Saturday. Jay Howell, a close friend and former teammate, stepped to the pulpit flanked by nine other ballplayers. "We all know what Tim's accomplishments on the field were," Howell said, frequently stopping to compose himself. "That's part of the baseball record.
SPORTS
April 28, 2007
I read the article about the tragic death of former Dodgers pitcher Tim Crews ["Losing His Memory," April 22] and, while saddened by a family's loss of their husband and father, their playing the blame game against the Dodgers and baseball in general is absurd. If they want to place blame, then they should place the blame accordingly, and that blame goes to Tim Crews solely. Boating recklessly while legally drunk is not the Dodgers' fault nor anyone else's fault. Perhaps the Crews family will come to terms with this reality in the near future and get on with their lives.
SPORTS
April 22, 2007 | Bill Plaschke
Amid the deceptively smooth rolling pastures of this rural lake community, there is a crack. Through it, into a most unfair darkness, a young man and his baseball longings have slipped. His name is Shawn Crews. He is, at 18, the oldest son of the late Dodgers reliever Tim Crews. Fourteen years after his father was killed in an infamous boating accident during spring training, Shawn has become him. The kid has the same sparkling blue eyes, the wide smile, the forceful twang.
SPORTS
March 23, 1993 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A boating accident Monday night on their only scheduled day off during spring training killed Cleveland Indian pitcher Steve Olin and seriously injured teammates Tim Crews and Bob Ojeda, both former Dodgers. Olin, 27, died instantly when an 18-foot open-air bass boat in which he was riding ran head-high into a new dock extending some 220-250 feet into Little Lake Nellie from a private home near Tavares, Fla.
SPORTS
March 24, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time Perry Brigmond arrived at Tim Crews' house for dinner Monday night, Crews and teammates Steve Olin and Bob Ojeda were already fishing out on Little Lake Nellie. Dinner was at 6 p.m., but Brigmond didn't arrive until about 7:15. He ate quickly and then, along with Fernando Montes, the Cleveland Indians' strength trainer, drove Crews' truck down to the bank of the lake to try to spot the boat.
SPORTS
March 25, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came from all over the state and points beyond, including Kirk Gibson, Sparky Anderson, Don Fehr and Gene Michael. The Dodgers sent two busloads, carrying almost their entire team. All of the Cleveland Indians were there. They came to grieve collectively, but each with a different intensity. Some hoped Wednesday night's memorial service would put an end to the emotion they have felt over the tragic death of Tim Crews and Steve Olin.
SPORTS
April 4, 1991 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two hours before leaving Dodgertown for Los Angeles Thursday, Darryl Strawberry wanted to put himself through one last spring-training test. He was running toward second base, his line drive bouncing toward the outfield fence. The decision was spontaneous. "I said, 'Man, I might as well check out my leg, see what happens,' " Strawberry said. Moments later, he was sliding into third base with a triple. Strawberry is returning home a happy man with a sound right hamstring.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
CLERMONT, Fla. - The ring sits in a black box at the bottom of a tan ostrich-skin briefcase, the contents of which have been unchanged for two decades. This was Tim Crews' briefcase. It once accompanied him to Dodger Stadium. Now it sits buried in the back of a closet, under some clothes, from where it is gently removed and carefully unlocked only on special occasions. Laurie Crews places the briefcase on a coffee table, slowly runs her hands over its faded leather, and asks her youngest son Travis to open it. It's the 25th anniversary of her late husband's greatest triumph.
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