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Laurindo Almeida

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1988 | LAURIE OCHOA, Times Staff Writer
These days, we have become so inured to the Latin-tinged sound of the classical guitar that we are more likely to associate its music with car commercials than with the concert hall. But when Laurindo Almeida first came to United States from Brazil in 1947, the guitar was considered a simple instrument capable of producing only simple chords. Almeida was largely responsible for introducing Americans to the popular classical guitar repertoire.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1997
On April 11, Don Heckman wrote an article about Wynton Marsalis, saying ". . . he is the first musician to win Grammys in both the jazz and classical categories" ("Marsalis Credits Ellington, Fellow Musicians for Pulitzer"). Marsalis is extremely talented, but he definitely is not the first to win in both categories. If you check your records, I am sure you will find that Laurindo Almeida had won at least six Grammys. Since he is no longer living, I thought I would bring this information to your attention.
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NEWS
August 1, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laurindo Almeida, Brazilian-born classical and jazz guitarist whose performances and compositions earned five Grammy awards and an Academy Award, and whose work can be heard in more than 800 soundtracks, has died. He was 77. Almeida, who fused samba and jazz in the 1950s, making him the catalyst if not the creator of bossa nova, died Wednesday of cancer at Valley Presbyterian Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1995 | DAVID E. BRADY
Cal State Northridge will pay tribute to the late Brazilian guitar great Laurindo Almeida with an afternoon of music today to raise money for student scholarships, the Music Department announced. Featuring such performers as Bud Shank, Benny Carter, Charlie Byrd and Danny Welton, the benefit concert will begin at 2 p.m. in the University Student Union's Performing Arts Center, said music professor Ron Purcell. A reception will be held during intermission, he added.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Classical and jazz music, despite noble efforts at fusing the two over the decades, have remained separate and unequal entities in the music world. Among the earliest players who refused to respect the delineation was guitarist Laurindo Almeida, who could be heard finessing his way through the music of Villa Lobos, Bach, Jobim, Thelonius Monk, Burt Bacharach, George Gershwin or the Lennon- McCartney songbook with equal affection and skill.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Laurindo Almeida, intent on a memory that seems to be floating just out of sight, carefully cradles his guitar while playing the familiar strains of a Chopin Etude. "The first musical sound I heard was my mother playing the piano," the 72-year-old recalled during a recent interview at his home in the hills above Sherman Oaks. "She played little things, like the Chopin, and she played them very well. In those days, there was no TV, no radio in Brazil. The piano was the only instrument I heard."
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Leonard Feather is jazz critic for The Times.
Laurindo Almeida has been a part of the Southland scene for so long that it is hard to realize that he had a substantial career in his native Brazil before he arrived here in 1947 and promptly leaped to fame as a featured guitarist with the Stan Kenton Orchestra. Tonight and Saturday he will lead a trio at Le Cafe in Sherman Oaks. He is happy to be back in action after an experience last year that seemed likely to end his career and possibly his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1988 | THOMAS K. ARNOLD
Brazilian jazz guitarist Laurindo Almeida begins a three-week run tonight at Elario's nightclub, atop the Summerhouse Inn in La Jolla. Almeida was introduced to U.S. audiences as a member of legendary band leader Stan Kenton's second orchestra in the late 1940s. Later, he hooked up with multi-reedman (and fellow Kenton alumnus) Bud Shank, with whom he pioneered Latin-American and jazz fusion in the middle 1950s--years before Stan Getz's ground-breaking "Jazz Samba" album.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1997
On April 11, Don Heckman wrote an article about Wynton Marsalis, saying ". . . he is the first musician to win Grammys in both the jazz and classical categories" ("Marsalis Credits Ellington, Fellow Musicians for Pulitzer"). Marsalis is extremely talented, but he definitely is not the first to win in both categories. If you check your records, I am sure you will find that Laurindo Almeida had won at least six Grammys. Since he is no longer living, I thought I would bring this information to your attention.
NEWS
August 1, 1995 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laurindo Almeida, Brazilian-born classical and jazz guitarist whose performances and compositions earned five Grammy awards and an Academy Award, and whose work can be heard in more than 800 soundtracks, has died. He was 77. Almeida, who fused samba and jazz in the 1950s, making him the catalyst if not the creator of bossa nova, died Wednesday of cancer at Valley Presbyterian Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1994 | MAKI BECKER
The father of Bossa Nova, guitarist Laurindo Almeida, will donate more than 1,000 items from his personal collection of original scores and vellum copies of his compositions to Cal State Northridge. Also noted for the film scores he composed for "The Godfather" and "The Unforgiven," Almeida is widely recognized for introducing Brazilian music to this country by developing in the '50s what he calls "an amalgam of samba and jazz" that later evolved into the Bossa Nova.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Leonard Feather is jazz critic for The Times.
Laurindo Almeida has been a part of the Southland scene for so long that it is hard to realize that he had a substantial career in his native Brazil before he arrived here in 1947 and promptly leaped to fame as a featured guitarist with the Stan Kenton Orchestra. Tonight and Saturday he will lead a trio at Le Cafe in Sherman Oaks. He is happy to be back in action after an experience last year that seemed likely to end his career and possibly his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time they reach legend status, jazz musicians seem to fall into one of two mind-sets. One is the ego-driven, I-told-you-so camp, occupied by players who only wonder why the world took so long to come around. In the other camp reside players thankful for a long, productive career. Guitarist Laurindo Almeida, who plays this Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights at the Jazz Note in Pacific Beach, represents in the fullest this healthier state of mind. He is the humblest of legends.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Classical and jazz music, despite noble efforts at fusing the two over the decades, have remained separate and unequal entities in the music world. Among the earliest players who refused to respect the delineation was guitarist Laurindo Almeida, who could be heard finessing his way through the music of Villa Lobos, Bach, Jobim, Thelonius Monk, Burt Bacharach, George Gershwin or the Lennon- McCartney songbook with equal affection and skill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1994 | MAKI BECKER
The father of Bossa Nova, guitarist Laurindo Almeida, will donate more than 1,000 items from his personal collection of original scores and vellum copies of his compositions to Cal State Northridge. Also noted for the film scores he composed for "The Godfather" and "The Unforgiven," Almeida is widely recognized for introducing Brazilian music to this country by developing in the '50s what he calls "an amalgam of samba and jazz" that later evolved into the Bossa Nova.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Laurindo Almeida has racked up so many credits for so long--mainly as a classical virtuoso, but sometimes in the company of the Modern Jazz Quartet, Bud Shank and other jazz artists--that one expects certain qualities to come into focus wherever he takes his guitar. Tuesday at the Vine St. Bar & Grill, he offered little evidence of the rhythmic excitement and technical mastery once associated with him.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Laurindo Almeida, intent on a memory that seems to be floating just out of sight, carefully cradles his guitar while playing the familiar strains of a Chopin Etude. "The first musical sound I heard was my mother playing the piano," the 72-year-old recalled during a recent interview at his home in the hills above Sherman Oaks. "She played little things, like the Chopin, and she played them very well. In those days, there was no TV, no radio in Brazil. The piano was the only instrument I heard."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1989 | JIM WASHBURN
Early on in an acoustic trio performance Friday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, guitarist Al DiMeola introduced fellow picker Larry Coryell as "the godfather of fusion guitar." While this was certainly apt--even before coming to prominence with Gary Burton's quartet, Coryell had mixed jazz with rock rhythms and effects in the psychedelic-era Free Spirits--Friday's concert raised the question of whether Coryell's reputation as the sire of fusion should be an honor or an epithet.
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