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Lauro Fred Cavazos

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NEWS
August 10, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
In a move that could boost the struggling presidential campaign of Vice President George Bush, President Reagan on Tuesday nominated a prominent Texan as secretary of education and the first Latino to serve in the Cabinet. Lauro Fred Cavazos, president of Texas Tech University and an anatomy professor, was named to succeed William J. Bennett at the Education Department. Bennett, a colorful, controversial conservative, will step down Sept.
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NEWS
December 13, 1990 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lauro F. Cavazos, the first Latino member of the President's Cabinet, resigned Wednesday as secretary of education one day after a closed-door meeting with White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu and amid criticism that his department had not measured up. The department's "performance was short of where we wanted it to be," one senior White House official said, adding that it was unclear whether Cavazos "had been pushed" to resign during his Tuesday meeting with Sununu.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos, under fire for remarks he made last spring about Latino parents' attitudes toward education, stuck to his guns Monday as he prepared to open the last of a series of hearings on Latino education. "When there is a failure, we are all responsible, every citizen in this country. . . . That applies to parents as well as teachers, the business community (and others)," Cavazos told a Los Angeles news conference at Huntington Park High School.
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Swift criticism Friday did not keep Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos from repeating his assertion that students who do not speak English are not ready for public education. "Parental involvement and language competency are basic," Cavazos told about 1,500 teachers and principals in this city on the Mexican border. "If that child cannot speak English the first day of school, that child is not ready to learn."
NEWS
April 12, 1990
Leading Latinos criticized U.S. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos for saying Latino parents deserve much of the blame for a high dropout rate among their children. Cruz Chavira, chief of staff for the San Antonio-based League of United Latin American Citizens, which claims to be the largest Latino group in the United States, said he was upset by Cavazos' remarks and that scores of educators had been calling LULAC to voice their anger.
NEWS
April 11, 1990
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos said in San Antonio that parents and teachers must lead the way to improve education for Latinos, a group that has a 40% dropout rate before completing high school. At the first of five hearings in the nation on Latino education, Cavazos said he supports "school-based management" in which local educators and parents have more input in education. "Parental involvement is a responsibility and also a right," Cavazos said.
NEWS
December 6, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos pledged Monday to raise a strong voice within the Bush Administration for increased federal spending to wipe out what he called America's "deficit in education."
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President-elect George Bush, reaching again into the ranks of Reagan Administration officials, announced Monday that he wants to keep Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh and Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos and that he will nominate Richard G. Darman to be his budget director. All five of Bush's Cabinet-level appointees so far have worked for the current Administration.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | JIM GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Despite the delay in staffing of some of the top positions in his new Administration, President-elect George Bush is nearly certain to choose John Tower as secretary of defense and Richard G. Darman as his budget director, a senior-level member of the President-elect's team said Saturday. In addition, Dick Thornburgh now appears more than likely to retain his position as attorney general, and Lauro F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1988
Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos began his first official swing through Southern California on Wednesday with a speech in Los Angeles to the Mexican-American Engineering Society focusing on the low numbers of Latinos entering the fields of science and engineering. Cavazos, former president of Texas Tech University and the first Latino cabinet member, said only 2% of Latino college students are science and engineering majors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1990 | JEAN MERL, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos, under fire for remarks he made last spring about Latino parents' attitudes toward education, stuck to his guns Monday as he prepared to open the last of a series of hearings on Latino education. "When there is a failure, we are all responsible, every citizen in this country. . . . That applies to parents as well as teachers, the business community (and others)," Cavazos told a Los Angeles news conference at Huntington Park High School.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos released the controversial annual state-by-state survey of educational achievement in America on Wednesday and deplored the meager results as reflecting a national "indifference, complacency and passivity." Asked at a news conference if the results--known as the annual wall chart--could be condemned as "horrible," the secretary replied: "Yes, it is a terrible report, but there also are some improvements shown. So it's not really a terrible report.
NEWS
April 12, 1990
Leading Latinos criticized U.S. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos for saying Latino parents deserve much of the blame for a high dropout rate among their children. Cruz Chavira, chief of staff for the San Antonio-based League of United Latin American Citizens, which claims to be the largest Latino group in the United States, said he was upset by Cavazos' remarks and that scores of educators had been calling LULAC to voice their anger.
NEWS
April 11, 1990
U.S. Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos said in San Antonio that parents and teachers must lead the way to improve education for Latinos, a group that has a 40% dropout rate before completing high school. At the first of five hearings in the nation on Latino education, Cavazos said he supports "school-based management" in which local educators and parents have more input in education. "Parental involvement is a responsibility and also a right," Cavazos said.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Extensive testing of American elementary and high school students shows they are still "dreadfully inadequate" in reading and writing skills, Secretary of Education Lauro F. Cavazos said Tuesday as he released a national report card ordered by Congress. "As a nation," Cavazos said, "we should be appalled, appalled that we have placed our children in such jeopardy."
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | Associated Press
Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos joined gray-haired alumni and fifth-graders in Pilgrim outfits Friday to mark the 350th anniversary of the nation's oldest free school--made new for its birthday by an infusion of renovation funds. Cavazos said the refurbishing of Mather School, where morale had sagged as graffiti and other scars multiplied in the past decade, "speaks to the way our nation is getting together to address our education deficit."
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | LAURIE DUNCAN, Times Staff Writer
Lauro F. Cavazos, in his first news conference as education secretary, said Wednesday that he has made no deal with GOP presidential nominee George Bush to continue in office if Bush wins the November election, and he declared that his biggest challenge is to ensure that "every person in America is educated to his or her full potential."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989
Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos, visiting Los Angeles, said Friday that the United States will not solve its budget and trade deficits until it addresses its "education deficit." But Cavazos told an audience of about 600 people at UCLA that he does "not sense a national commitment to improve education" and said public interest in the problem must be raised. "We will not develop solutions to the budget deficit and the trade deficit until we solve the education deficit," Cavazos said.
NEWS
October 2, 1989
Education Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos praised parental choice as the cornerstone to rebuilding America's schools but said some restrictions on student transfers may be necessary to prevent segregation. In an interview on ABC-TV's "This Week With David Brinkley," Cavazos said he has been pushing all along the same school reform ideas that President Bush and U.S. governors agreed upon at last week's summit.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | LORI SILVER, Times Staff Writer
The Education Department, reversing its opposition to expanded bilingual education, is quietly shifting federal policy in favor of programs that use native languages to teach students English as well as other subjects. "It's a very significant shift," said James Lyons, executive director of the National Assn. for Bilingual Education. The department's new posture contrasts sharply with the policies of former Education Secretary William J.
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