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OPINION
March 30, 1997
Re "14% of Students Have Carried Weapons to School, Study Says," March 10: The three most important features of the study were neglected. First, the recent report is unique because it offers the students' point of view. Collaboratively, a team of faculty, students and staff from USC, the ACLU and Cal State L.A, managed to secure a large sample (1,802 students) representative of the LAUSD population. Secondly, our central conclusion is that high school students in L.A. are exposed to incredible amounts of violence--most of it outside of the school environment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Parents at 24th Street Elementary School have overwhelmingly chosen a partnership between the Los Angeles Unified School District and a charter school to run the persistently low-performing Jefferson Park campus. Among those eligible to cast ballots, 80% chose a proposal that combines the efforts of the school district with those of Crown Preparatory Academy, which already runs an unaffiliated middle school out of surplus space on the campus. The results were announced Wednesday morning.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI
Burglars and vandals broke into about 44 schools over Memorial Day weekend, including about a dozen in the San Fernando Valley, stealing items ranging from computers to classroom supplies, Los Angeles Unified School District officials said Wednesday. Among the schools hit was Zane Grey High School in Reseda, which had a computer stolen, Lt. Javier Ruiz of the district police said. Ruiz said long weekends frequently lead to burglaries of LAUSD schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
Although Los Angeles magnet schools have long been seen as an elusive and exclusive club, more than two dozen of them are under-enrolled and actively looking to fill classroom seats. At Montara Avenue Elementary in South Gate, for example, the math, science and technology magnet can accommodate 220 students; last year just 76 applied. On a recent day, each of Montara's magnet students created projects on stars, the sun and the moon for an upcoming fair aimed at attracting new students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994
Congratulations. Your special report on school reform on Oct. 23 was nothing less than superb. The concept, angle and writing were excellent. What was especially meaningful to me was that after many years of The Times' direct and indirect cheerleading for LEARN as the sine qua non of L.A. school reform, you finally portrayed it accurately. It is simply one tentacle of a multifaceted effort at school reform in L.A. Substantively and conceptually, at best it is no better than, and at worst it lags behind, the other school reform initiatives that you featured.
OPINION
July 5, 2008
Re "Power to change schools sought," June 28 Again, thanks to LAUSD Supt. David L. Brewer's own words, we are made aware of what folly it was to hire a former admiral to head a large urban school district. Brewer's metaphor equating principals with ship captains who have the power of God would only lead to further failures. As a substitute teacher in the district, I have encountered many truly incompetent principals who were elevated beyond their abilities and were toxic to their school environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN
In an area where at least one-third of the students lack medical insurance, school officials on Friday announced the fall opening of a center serving the health and human services needs of 28,000 students and their families in the north San Fernando Valley. The Kennedy/Monroe Family Resource Center, to be housed at Kennedy High School, will be open free to families from the 28 schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District's cluster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998
Regrettably, the editorial of Nov. 15, "Violence Invades Schoolyards," conveyed the erroneous impression that the shooting of two students near Monroe High School took place on the school grounds. Further, it implies that schools are dangerous places for students and staff, when the facts are completely contrary to this assertion. The Los Angeles Unified School District's focus on maintaining the safest possible school environment on all of our campuses has resulted in a 47% decrease in crime incidents over the past five years at a time when district enrollment has increased by more than 10%. They key to school safety has been to address ourselves to specific safety issues, to develop remedies for those problems and to keep before us constantly the important nurturing role a safe school environment plays in a student's academic development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort by the Los Angeles Unified School District to improve reading skills in second- and third-graders who scored poorly on state standardized tests and risk being held back, at least 22 San Fernando Valley schools will offer Saturday remedial classes, many beginning today. The rest will begin within the month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998 | WILLIAM G. OUCHI and MIKE ROOS, William G. Ouchi is the chairman and Mike Roos the president and CEO of LEARN
Ruben Zacarias is emerging as the potential strong education leader that Los Angeles has long awaited. The superintendent has demanded reform of the 100 worst schools in the school district and is holding the principals of those schools accountable for improving the educational achievement of their students. He has taken decisive action in getting the air conditioning our schools need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
At some Los Angeles elementary schools, teachers have drastically cut time for science because of pressure to focus on reading and math. If they can incorporate science into class time, they say they mostly have to buy their own supplies. And educators from the state's high-tech epicenter of Silicon Valley say some students come to high school having never once conducted an experiment in earlier grades. California, known as a global symbol of scientific and technological excellence, is failing to invest enough time, money and training to teach science well, according to interviews and a new survey of more than 1,100 elementary school teachers and administrators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2011 | By Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles school district will hold a shortened day of classes on May 13 to accommodate a planned teachers union protest without interrupting standardized testing on most campuses. Dismissal time will vary from school to school but could be up to several hours earlier than normal. Schools will be required to make up the lost time from the shortened day later in the year, according to Los Angeles Unified School District officials. The teachers' demonstration is aimed at encouraging state legislators to place tax extensions on the fall ballot to provide continued funding to school districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011 | By Howard Blume and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of students were kept in classrooms without food, water or access to restrooms longer than necessary, the Los Angeles school district's police chief acknowledged, as officials coped with complaints from parents frustrated once more with the district's handling of an emergency situation. Students from nine San Fernando Valley schools were in lockdown for as long as five hours as officers combed campuses and neighborhoods for a suspect who shot and wounded a school police officer Wednesday just outside El Camino Real High School in Woodland Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2010 | By Jason Song
Los Angeles teachers union members have ratified a deal to shorten the school calendar this and next year, officials announced Saturday. Nearly 80% of United Teachers Los Angeles members who cast ballots approved of the deal, which could save the Los Angeles Unified School District up to $140 million, save the jobs of about 2,100 employees and maintain class sizes. Under the agreement, which was negotiated over several months, teachers would take an unpaid day off the Friday before Memorial Day and schools would close four days earlier for summer vacation.
OPINION
September 29, 2009
Re "Dropouts cost the state $1.1 billion, study finds," Sept. 24 It is nearly useless to attempt to stem dropouts at the high school level. The problem starts long before and usually reaches a pinnacle in middle school, from which students can "graduate" to high school without passing their classes. Once students arrive at high school without the skills they need, they are then forced into college-track classes, such as Algebra 2, even though many jobs in the new economy either don't require such classes or require more specialized classes, which of course are not offered in many LAUSD schools.
OPINION
July 25, 2009
When Green Dot Public Schools took over Locke High School a year ago, the thinking was that a well-run charter might prove an instructive model for improving Los Angeles' public schools. That might yet prove true. What few expected was that Green Dot would set a new example for other charter schools. But that's exactly what has happened, as evidenced by a recent proposal to allow charters and other organizations to compete for the right to operate 50 new L.A. schools over the next few years.
OPINION
September 29, 2009
Re "Dropouts cost the state $1.1 billion, study finds," Sept. 24 It is nearly useless to attempt to stem dropouts at the high school level. The problem starts long before and usually reaches a pinnacle in middle school, from which students can "graduate" to high school without passing their classes. Once students arrive at high school without the skills they need, they are then forced into college-track classes, such as Algebra 2, even though many jobs in the new economy either don't require such classes or require more specialized classes, which of course are not offered in many LAUSD schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011 | By Howard Blume and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of students were kept in classrooms without food, water or access to restrooms longer than necessary, the Los Angeles school district's police chief acknowledged, as officials coped with complaints from parents frustrated once more with the district's handling of an emergency situation. Students from nine San Fernando Valley schools were in lockdown for as long as five hours as officers combed campuses and neighborhoods for a suspect who shot and wounded a school police officer Wednesday just outside El Camino Real High School in Woodland Hills.
OPINION
July 20, 2009
It's a splendid day in the Los Angeles Unified School District when labor, charter schools, parents, neighborhoods and the school board align behind an inventive idea that benefits children. Sad to say, this is not one of those days. But it could be if, instead of ossifying their expectations, opposing parties devise a fair method of choosing how more than 50 new schools should be operated.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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